Bujikan for tkd practicioner

Discussion in 'Ninjutsu' started by Manny, Oct 14, 2008.

  1. Manny

    Manny Senior Master

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    Good day all, my nik is Manny and I'am a firsth degree black belt in TKD, some days ago I meet an amigo who trains some kind of ninjitsu if I recall he told me something about a japanese sensei Hatsumi or Doctor Hatsumi or something like that. My fiend told me it would be nice if I train weekends with his group and there I can learn something new without sacrifice my TKD. So what do you think off? this training would improve my TK technikes?

    Manny
     
  2. terryl965

    terryl965 <center><font size="2"><B>Martial Talk Ultimate<BR

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    Hatsumi is agreat teacher and if you have the chance go check it out, there can always be something out there to help with SD types scenirio's.
     
  3. exile

    exile To him unconquered.

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    Terry's right about this, Manny, but remember something else: you can't do SD just by learning techniques. You can only learn SD by training SD realistically, and that's not very pleasant. You can only become good at street-effective counters to real violence by subjecting yourself to attacking moves which come as close as possible to that level of violence&#8212;that's what people mean when they talk about 'non-compliant' training partners. Otherwise, it's like learning the theory of some chess opening without ever playing even a single game against a skilled, aggressive player who's better than you are.

    If you want SD for real&#8212;and from your posts in other threads that's what seems important to you, which is IMO a very healthy, practical view of the MAs and their fundamental purpose&#8212;you have to train against people who can simulate the typical acts of violence that initiate street attacks to a realistic enough level that you're being tested under serious pressure. The adrenaline rush you experience in a genuine violent attack is notoriously hard to handle unless you know how to channel it into effective ferocity, rather than becoming paralyzed by it. And you have to move in a way which is close to bombproof in real time, without thinking. All that will take a lot of very focused practice. Just being shown moves, no matter how effective they might be in principle, isn't nearly enough...
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2008
  4. Shicomm

    Shicomm Purple Belt

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    Enriching your training is almost always a good idea.

    The different point of view to certain things might be confusing but overall it's a step ahead imho.
     
  5. Cryozombie

    Cryozombie Grandmaster

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    FWIW, I'm gonna disagree with Terry and Exile.

    Keep in mind this is only an opinion.

    Bujinkan, and TKD movements are so dissimilar that studying Bujinkan will not really improve your TKD... in the same way that being an expert on a bicycle will not really improve your driving skills in a car.

    Sure, some stuff will translate, but its a completly different thing. It's not to say you can't find benefit from doing it, and improve your overall fighting ability, but it won't, I feel, make your TKD better. If your overall goal is to get better at TKD...

    Study lots more TKD.
     
  6. Dale Seago

    Dale Seago Black Belt

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    I agree with both Exile and Cryozombie. :)
     
  7. shesulsa

    shesulsa Columbia Martial Arts Academy

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    Manny, you've had excellent replies and I'd like to echo them.

    You should probably determine what your goal right now is and determine what your longer-range goals are. If you seek to improve your TKD, then (as you have already been advised) practice TKD more, visit more TKD schools, etcetera. If you want to improve your self-defense skills, then you need to add time to train in various types of self-defense from various styles and sources. If you want to eventually have an additional art in your pocket, then I would highly recommend BBT. Be prepared, though ... it rox and a good teacher will be quite traditional. This is not thought of highly by modern martial artists but is what you're used to and value can be found in the appropriate application of traditional training.

    What I've seen is absolutely completely different than TKD. No comparison. Ask politely if you can observe a class and if you can, GO!

    Good luck - please tell us what you decide to do.
     
  8. Brian R. VanCise

    Brian R. VanCise MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I like Shicomm's post above. Additional training in any system is a plus and helps to broaden your horizons. It is a lot like going to school. If you only ever went to one school and only had one teacher even if they were the best then you would have had a limited eduction. New experiences even sometimes if they are not good only help in your growth. Budo Taijutsu is an absolutely fantastic system and it grows with a practitioner and never gets boring as their is always something new to learn. [​IMG]
     
  9. ElfTengu

    ElfTengu Blue Belt

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    I would say, study both, but don't expect them to mix, unless you want to end up like Robert Bussey, who did exactly that. He was Taekwondo ranked prior to the Bujinkan and wouldn't give up the fancy TKD kicks, so his taijutsu was never really taijutsu. It looked cool to teenagers though, have a look at some of his clips:

    http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=Fyra1kCIyow

    http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=zHXUxw1NsLI&feature=related

    This is NOT Takamatsuden (Bujinkan/Genbukan/Jinenkan) Ninjutsu or Taijutsu. If it weren't for the fact that Bussey once held a low dan grade in the Bujinkan, he would be known as a total fake.
     
  10. Carol

    Carol Crazy like a...

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    Manny, what first comes to my mind is...your friend sounds like a fellow that practices Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu, and naturally your friend wants his school to succeed.

    So...your buddy may love his training but he may also be recruiting for his school. In other words, he may be giving you a sales pitch so you can join up and help his school.

    I'm not suggesting that training with him is a bad idea. Dr. Hatsumi has a terrific system, and you could easily have a lot of fun learning the Taijutsu. If you have a friend to practice with, that makes it even better.

    But if you do go, don't make a training decision just based on what your friend says.

    Regardless of how you decide, train hard and have fun :)
     
  11. ArmorOfGod

    ArmorOfGod Senior Master

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    I skimmed the other replies because I don't want them to taint my answer.
    Do you want to be a taekwondo practictioner or a martial artist? Do you want to represent pure tkd, or learn other techniques to add to your personal knowledge?
    Both are great things in their own way; you just have to decide which you are.

    BTW, tkd practitioners are martial artists, I just worded it that way to make my reply make sense.

    AoG
     
  12. bljohnson

    bljohnson Yellow Belt

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    I was very close to testing for my second degree bb in tkd when I thought about expanding my own training and wandered into the new dojo in town. It was a Bujinkan dojo and I can promise you the two styles are nothing alike. I actually was extremely impressed with this style. I remember thinking " holy crap this hurts, I have never seen anything like this!" I quit my TKD training and jumped right into the Bujinkan that was over 16 yrs ago and I still love training in it.123
     

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