Basic throws, wristlocks etc. anyone could learn from home?

Discussion in 'Jujutsu / Judo' started by Zephyor, Sep 7, 2016.

  1. Zephyor

    Zephyor Orange Belt

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    First of all I have to say that i simply love the way JJ works mechanically, requiring such small effort to take some down. The utility this art provides in a real life self defense situation is more beneficial than a striking art
    (eg: punching someone lights-out in self defense leaving him with an express ticket to hospital VS have him on the ground till he just looses any aggressive intent) Can sopmone provide me with some quality material from where i can learn some of the JJ basics and principles? I'd be very grateful!
    TY in advance
     
  2. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    Good throwing and locking is fairly easy to learn. And very easy to get wrong. Even the simplest techniques can be maddening to figure out on your own, and you won't be certain if you're ever doing it right without an instructor.

    If it's a money issue that has you looking for home learning, go to classes when you can (some schools will let you pay for a class when you attend) and make a friend there who will practice those techniques with you between visits. This way, you're at least getting instructor input from time to time, and can stay focused on just a very few techniques.

    If it's time that's keeping you out of classes - can't find any that fit your schedule - then look for an instructor who will teach you private lessons.

    Trying to learn a technique at home by yourself is problematic even for those with experience with similar techniques.
     
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  3. Kickboxer101

    Kickboxer101 Master Black Belt

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    You wouldn't be able to learn anything online best thing to do is go to a class especially with grappling. Striking is easy to train by yourself grappling not so much
     
  4. Tez3

    Tez3 Sr. Grandmaster

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    Train perhaps but not learn, you still need an instructor to show you in the first place.
     
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  5. frank raud

    frank raud Master Black Belt

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    So, you think throwing someone onto a hard surface is less damaging than hitting them? Do you know what happens when some one does not know to go with your wrist lock? It becomes a wrist break. Hold someone down until they lose aggressive intent?
     
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  6. Tony Dismukes

    Tony Dismukes Senior Master

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    The majority of folks here will tell you that you cannot learn a martial art at home without in-person instruction and feedback from a live teacher.

    A minority will say that you can learn at home if you are talented and disciplined and have good video instruction, good training partners, preferably substantial prior martial arts experience, and at least occasional feedback (in-person or by video) from a good instructor. Even this minority will say that this is an inferior option to training with an in-person instructor.

    I will say that even if you are unusually talented and disciplined and have good training partners and good video instruction, that throws and wristlocks are some of the worst things to try learning without supervised instruction. They require nuanced adjustments that you are highly unlikely to spot on your own, especially if you don't have substantial prior experience with them. More importantly, they offer lots of ways for you and your training partner to get accidentally injured - potentially seriously. I'm a fan of good instructional videos, but I strongly recommend against trying to teach yourself throws and wristlocks without proper supervision.
     
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  7. marques

    marques Master Black Belt

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    Learn at home? You cannot learn from 'material'...
    Perhaps you can get a friend and mimic a video. But eventually you will need personal guidance or it will be just frustrating and pointless.

    After a few years of training, you can (re)learn by yourself, by books websites and youtube. At that point you should already recognize what is good if you have a good understanding of the principles, a notion of priorities and a memory of the good standards. Otherwise, forget. Even striking. Moving is easy (for most of us). Striking or grappling is art... or many ones together! :)
     
  8. wingchun100

    wingchun100 Senior Master

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    Find a school near you.
     
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  9. Jeff_Beish

    Jeff_Beish Yellow Belt

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    I used to tie an obi or a heavy bike inner tube to a tree out in my back yard and practice entry in throws. My wife asked me what I was doing so I replied that in the event I was attacked by a tree I would be ready.
     
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  10. Hanzou

    Hanzou Senior Master

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    Just to add to what others have said (if you decide to take up a more competitive JJ style like Judo or Bjj) going to an actual school is an invaluable experience. You get to meet a variety of fellow players who you can practice with and against, and that will make you a far better martial artist as a whole. Rolling against people far larger and stronger than me made me way better a lot more quickly than if I was practicing alone.
     
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  11. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    This advice holds true even for non-competitive arts/schools. Working with people stronger, taller, faster, etc. is how you learn to adapt for either competition or self-defense. Some of my most valuable training came with a guy who was about 6 inches taller and probably 60 lbs. heavier than me. He was a few years behind me in training, so I had to use my experience to offset his natural advantage.
     
  12. frank raud

    frank raud Master Black Belt

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    Y'all think it's funny, then Groot shows up.
     
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  13. Hanshi

    Hanshi Orange Belt

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    Absolutely, wrist locks and related techniques require a teacher; there's no way to get around it. And you have to have a partner who knows to tap and can take a fall. Any other way will only lead to frustration and failure.
     
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  14. Bill Mattocks

    Bill Mattocks Sr. Grandmaster

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    I've had people who taught themselves a wrist lock try to apply it. Kinda funny the first time.
     
  15. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    I'd pay money to see what their results were like. It'd give me insight into how people think they work - useful for those of us teaching.
     
  16. Bill Mattocks

    Bill Mattocks Sr. Grandmaster

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    It's fun. a tug, a pull, a twist, a "no wait, it's like this" then embarrassed silence. Hand techniques are terrific and fun and do work, but you really have to feel them, both doing and receiving, followed by lots of practice.
     
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  17. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    Sorry, just ran across this thread. Personally I don't think striking is easy to train by oneself. Of course maybe I was just too uncoordinated and dumb. But a powerful strike without fingers and thumb configured properly, or a bent wrist is imho, a disaster waiting to happen.

    After one has learned some basics, learning from videos might be easier for strikes and kicks. But my experience was it took several weeks with constant correction, to learn enough to have some comfort that injury was less likely.

    I know there are a couple of online Hapkido schools, one of which advertises on Martial Talk. But to my knowledge, they prefer occasional attendance, but at least having videos sent to critique. I guess it works for them, and again, to my knowledge, they do make an effort to try to do long distance learning as best as it can be. But imho it will never be as good as training with a good teacher.

    EDIT: I should have read all this thread before commenting, especially considering its age. Nothing I said hadn't already been said at least once, most of it more than once. Sorry all.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2016

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