Anyong ah Say yo vs. Anyong ahshim nika

Discussion in 'Korean Martial Arts - General' started by IcemanSK, Jun 29, 2009.

  1. IcemanSK

    IcemanSK El Conquistador nim!

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    I have no native speakers to ask anymore so I come to my friends here for knowledge.

    My understanding is that Anyong ah say yo is the less formal way of saying "Hello" & the later is more formal. Am I correct?

    My 1st instructor (a Korean) taught us the former when we bow into the dojang to address him. Given my current understanding that it's a less formal address, I find this odd. And from the TV show "Arrested Development" they thought the kid's name was Anyong, but the narrator said it was the way to say Hello in Korean. Is it a shortened version like "hi."
     
  2. DMcHenry

    DMcHenry Blue Belt

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    You are correct. When I was talking to a native speaker and used annyong hashimnikia he told me no one used that (too formal) but just used annyong hasaeyo. Then listening and being around other Koreans that's what I heard them use to each other.

    If I were addressing a grandmaster I would use the more formal, otherwise I just use the famililar.
     
  3. rmclain

    rmclain Black Belt

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    I get most of my Korean language lessons from an older Korean (~70yrs of age), so my practice has been more formal. But, this is my input...

    I've notice the younger generation (under 40 years of age) using Ahn Yong Haseyo, which is more like "Hello." Older generation frown on this, probably like an older person who speaks English frowning on the way that kids address each other today. But, it is still proper.

    Ahn Yong Hashim Nikka is literally asking "How are you?" but in a sort-of "surface" sense of how someone is doing (maybe physical part?). This is still considered a formal way to address someone you wish to show respect to.

    For even more respect, you could use, "Pyung Ahn Hashim Nikka?" which is asking "Are you at peace?" which is more asking about everything (mental, spirit, physical). This is a very formal way to ask that really nobody uses anymore except the older generation. You will probably shock anyone Korean that you address this way, as it may be a sign of higher-learning or gentlemanly speach. They will probably ask you where you learned this address.

    R. McLain


     
  4. MBuzzy

    MBuzzy Grandmaster

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    Wow - great answers on this one!

    Walking around the streets of Korea, you want "annyeong haseyo," that is the common version that everyone uses.

    Annyeong hashimnikka is technically "How are you" but is a VERY formal way of saying it, reserved for someone of much higher "rank" than you. I have been told that some Koreans (such as waiters or clerks) will see it as an insult if you use this in common conversation.
     
  5. jacktnicol

    jacktnicol Yellow Belt

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    yo at the end of any thing denotes respect well the later is for people in very high positions. for example i have to use when taking to my university prof.

    This is okay if children are talking to each other or i am talking to them. for example a student comes into the dojang and says an yong ha sa yo i just just reply anyong.

    If you have any other korean questions feel free to put them up i have lived in korea a year and a half and am pretty good at it now and if i can't answer the question i have more than enough people to help me respond.

    JT
     
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  6. MBuzzy

    MBuzzy Grandmaster

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    I would just add that particularly in a MA situation, you should be very careful just using annyeong (if you're talking to someone that knows the difference), it is reserved for when you are very much higher "ranking" than the other person, but can be considered disrespectful in many situations. They really don't throw it around like we use "hi."

    Thanks! Where in Korea do you live? I lived in Kunsan for a year. Are you teaching English or there permanently?
     
  7. jacktnicol

    jacktnicol Yellow Belt

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    ya of course i guess i was a little unclear they are my students and school aged.

    I lived in bucheon then ilsan and currently in incheon. planning on coming back any time soon?

    JT
     
  8. MBuzzy

    MBuzzy Grandmaster

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    Nope, not any time soon. At some point, but it won't be for a while, I'm sure. My instructor still teaches in Kunsan and my organization is based there, so we do quite a few trips back and forth.
     
  9. jacktnicol

    jacktnicol Yellow Belt

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    Kunsan is far from incheon, but whats the name of the gym (and kwanjang) as i like visiting other dojang and networking.

    I could never teach english i know koreans that have better grammar than me lol

    I teach Taekwondo and Hapkido (also have boxing and jj (mma) experience but don't find that many students in the area) actually and am staying undefinatly thinking mabye four more years at this point.
     
  10. goingd

    goingd Purple Belt

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    Everyones right on that, just thought I'd add that my understanding of the direct translation of both versions is something along the lines of, "Are you at peace?"

    ^~^
     
  11. MBuzzy

    MBuzzy Grandmaster

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    the gym is on base at Kunsan Air Base, my instructor's name though, is Ch'oe, Ki Un....so I don't think that you can get there.
     
  12. MBuzzy

    MBuzzy Grandmaster

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    I've heard that, as well as "Well being"123
     

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