15 Taekwondo Blackbelts In MMA

Discussion in 'General Martial Arts Talk' started by Stuart, Feb 12, 2020.

  1. Rat

    Rat 3rd Black Belt

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    it would be doubly intresting to know how many of them have done X amount of practice at ground level. Or if they just started running about the place. Most people who start generally do it in a padded area/relatively safe area and at ground level learning the rolls etc. (and also they teach you the rolls and how to land first and some other safety moves)

    Also:


    Addendum: i feel the off road mantra of: "Fast as nessisary, slow as possible" Or something to that effect i cant recall it, fits well with parkor. In other words, only go as fast as you need to, and be as careful as you can.
     
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  2. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    The slap dissipates some of the energy, changes the timing (it is, to some extent, a tactile-audio cue for the timing), and stops rotation.
     
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  3. skribs

    skribs Senior Master

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    It also makes it sound like you're landing harder than you are, which is useful for demonstrations or entertainment.
     
  4. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I assume you mean "as opposed to what other method of training that". I'm not sure, because I don't know what else is out there. What I do know is that it seems to take a really long time to develop breakfalls to a level where most folks will be able to generalize the principles beyond the drills in the dojo. If I wanted to specifically train people to survive various falls (not throws), I think a more direct application might be faster for skill development.
     
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  5. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    If there was a picture or image with that, I can't see it. In any case, I've no idea what a breakfall front kick is, but it sounds painful. :hungover:
     
  6. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I think - and like you this involves some guesswork - that part of the point of the slap is to get the hand down a bit before the body, so the fall starts at the hand just a tad earlier than the body, distributing it over time. The "feather falls" found in some Aikido schools take this to an extreme. I'd love to learn those someday.
     
  7. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    He also "pulls" the hand slap on the pavement. On hard surfaces, I'll either remove the slap or change it to a reach, so the hand just reaches out and touches the ground (think a soft slap) ahead of the body.

    Even on mats, we usually try to avoid slapping with the foot, except when there's rotation in the fall, when we might reach with the ball of the foot to stop that rotation. I've clocked my ankle on a wooden floor during a roll (doing tumbling during a musical - Damn Yankees) in my 20's. Numbed my entire foot for about a minute.
     
  8. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes. When I trained Judo, we were taught the slap, then taught to take it out. At the time (not sure about now), slapping properly during a fall was a good way to make sure your opponent got ippon (full score for the throw), according to my instructor.
     
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  9. _Simon_

    _Simon_ Senior Master

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    Hehe I was mostly joking, just combining the two. Sorta like a "why not both" situation.

    Don't know if you have that tacos commercial where you are, but the family couldn't decide whether to have hard tacos or soft tacos for dinner, and the little girl says "Why don't we have both?" So they released a pack with both here in Aus XD. Reminded me of that haha..[​IMG]
     
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  10. Danny T

    Danny T Senior Master

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    I teach 3 types of falls.
    1. Breakfalls. This allows the practitioner to become more comfortable with falls and then being thrown. The slapping of the mat spreads the force of the body striking the ground into a wider area. Breakfalls are so the thrower can get in good reps and the person being thrown can take more throws. If you view most throws in judo you'll notice few breakfalls with slapping of the mat.

    2. Rolling falls. This allows the practitioner to remain attached to the thrower taking them down with you as you are thrown and you use the momentum to take them with you through the rollout and usually ends with you on top.

    3. Controlled falls. You'll see this many times in judo matches and in much of what you see of of those who do parkour. This allows the slowing of the body and the fall traveling a longer distance from the initial point of contact.
     
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  11. dvcochran

    dvcochran Senior Master

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    This definitely what we practice. I don't think I ever heard it called a controlled fall but that makes perfect sense.
     
  12. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I’ve started teaching those rolling falls, but only as a side note when I visit the old dojo (where I’m usually working with relatively advanced students). I’ll eventually add them to what I teach my students, as they get to a level for them. Those allow more resistance, and force the thrower to pay more attention to balance and position.

    I haven’t figured out how to teach the third ones. I figured them out on my own.
     
  13. Tez3

    Tez3 Sr. Grandmaster

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    Here, the British Racing School which teaches apprentice jockey's among others are teaching break falls to hopefully lessen the impact when jockeys come off during races.123
     

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