Wrote a book on power development based on Fascia

mograph

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It may have different mechanical properties, yes, but not gross structural differences. I often hear the fascia is like a ‘network‘ throughout the body connecting everything like a web. This is entirely false.
Is this because the fascia is discontinuous, with gaps in places (e.g. behind the knees)?
 
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Rishinjuku

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Do you believe that this would work for grappling? In other words, does this only apply to explosive power generation used by strikers, or do you think these teachings are transferrable for slow but strong movements, such as prying an arm into a better position from a resisting opponent?
I do BJJ to.
It works for grappling also. My hip throws became much stronger and so did my guillotine.
 

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Haven't watched the vid but it's a very well respected knowledgable instructor I've followed for many years, so am suuuure it should be good haha, on fascia and anatomy trains etc

 

mograph

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When you say ‘X’ muscles and ‘diagonals’ do you mean muscles that cross the midline of the body?
The Anatomy Trains model describes a kind of fascial helix that crosses at the abdomen and the back of the neck.
In my opinion, the model doesn't state that a muscle crosses the midline, but that two structures that meet at the midline work together in directions that cross the body. The model finds the "X" to be useful in terms of function and interaction.
It's a model that integrates, rather than separates.

Images from the secomd edition of the book.

 

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Gyakuto

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The Anatomy Trains model describes a kind of fascial helix that crosses at the abdomen and the back of the neck.
In my opinion, the model doesn't state that a muscle crosses the midline, but that two structures that meet at the midline work together in directions that cross the body. The model finds the "X" to be useful in terms of function and interaction.
It's a model that integrates, rather than separates.

Images from the secomd edition of the book.

I’ve dissected many people…there are no structures like that. Go to a library or good bookshop and look in an anatomy textbook/atlas, preferably with photos of dissections, and try to find structures as you’ve indicate. You will not find them.
 

mograph

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I’ve dissected many people…there are no structures like that. Go to a library or good bookshop and look in an anatomy textbook/atlas, preferably with photos of dissections, and try to find structures as you’ve indicate. You will not find them.
Hey, I’m just describing the model. Talk to that Thomas Myers guy.
 

mograph

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I’ve dissected many people…there are no structures like that. Go to a library or good bookshop and look in an anatomy textbook/atlas, preferably with photos of dissections, and try to find structures as you’ve indicate. You will not find them.
Maybe it's just me, but the structure in the left image kind of looks like the rectus sheath.
 
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