Wanting to join a dojo. I've done research but need some advice.

Jakobie

White Belt
Joined
Jul 19, 2017
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Hey everyone,

New member and hoping to get into a martial art. My reason for joining wasn't as much personal defense, although that's an added benefit, but more so to give me another hobby that will get me active. My goal is to become more flexible, more in control, and more disciplined.

I'd like to take part in competitions and I do like the idea of a structured progression system (but it is NOT a deal breaker). Growing up, I always thought the martial arts I saw in movies was cool, but I am afraid of "bullshido" studios that are just in it for the money.

Here are the dojos I've found in my area:

Brazilian Jiu Jutsu
http://www.graciejiujitsufabioleopoldo.com/brazilian-jiu-jitsu/

http://www.streetsportssimivalley.com/home.html

Karate

https://tsdukarate.com/

Okinawa-Te Karate | Simi Valley Martial Arts & Fitness

Hapkido/Tae Kwon Do
Jung's Martial Arts Center

Sky Martial Arts Simi Valley TaeKwonDo & HapKiDo Self Defense

I'm doing my best to see past the ******** and what looks good, but I'm hoping some members of the community who are familiar with one of these martial arts can help me out here.

Originally I was looking at Japanese Jiu Jitsu or Judo but don't see any schools in my area. I do like the idea of "traditional" martial arts, but I also want a martial art that could be used defensively at least a bit if need be.

Thanks for any and all assistance.
 
OP
J

Jakobie

White Belt
Joined
Jul 19, 2017
Messages
3
Reaction score
0

marques

Master Black Belt
Joined
Jun 7, 2015
Messages
1,187
Reaction score
380
Location
Essex, UK
All of your options will give you at least some flexibility, control, discipline and self defence skill. Hard to say which one is better for that. I think we need some more criteria for helping you.

I like your second post. Action. :) Try one class, 2 weeks... Try at least one other school or style. If you're happy, keep going. If you're not, keep searching. That's the way. Good luck!
 

Hanshi

Green Belt
Joined
Oct 9, 2012
Messages
147
Reaction score
97
Location
Virginia
Absolutely; check a class or two out before you decide. TKD is great if you want to compete but karate is too. Hapkido is excellent for self-defense.
 

kuniggety

2nd Black Belt
Joined
Jan 3, 2015
Messages
795
Reaction score
272
Location
Oahu, Hawaii
I did a quick perusal at all of the websites you linked and none had any red flags to me.

If you're interested in judo, you might want to check out Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. The focus is more on the newaza (ground work) rather than the trips and throws but there is a lot of cross-over in the arts since BJJ originated as a branch off of judo.
 

Headhunter

Senior Master
Joined
Aug 26, 2016
Messages
4,765
Reaction score
1,591
So my post isn't even visible yet and I think I may have found my school.

T.O.Westlake Karate Studio|Kids and family karate in Thousand Oaks

They were open with me over the phone and stated no contracts. Their Grandmaster seems to have legitimacy (was trained by Pat Johnson, see: Pat E. Johnson - Wikipedia) and they will let me attend a class for free, as well as two weeks of classes for $20 to try it out.
Don't go for things just based on what they names they give. Just because they trained with a legit teacher doesn't mean they're a great teacher. Not everyone is a born teacher maybe he's skilled but he may not teach well. Best way to do is go down and see for yourself
 

oftheherd1

Senior Master
Joined
May 12, 2011
Messages
4,685
Reaction score
817
I am a Hapkidoist, so of course I would recommend it for what you are looking for except competition. That isn't normally done.

But all the arts you have listed should give you what you want. Find a place you like. That should be your best bet.
 

JR 137

Grandmaster
Joined
Apr 26, 2015
Messages
5,162
Reaction score
3,218
Location
In the dojo
As everyone is saying, the only way to know which one is the best fit for you is to go and visit. Take a class or two (the two weeks for $20 is a great idea).

How the art is being taught and who you're training alongside are far more important than what art is being taught. Take the Okinawan karate place for example - there are places where you'll train hard contact, medium contact, and no contact; there are places where adults and children are taught completely separately, together, or no children at all. The syllabus could easily be the same, and the instructors' instructors could be the same, but you'll have completely different experiences in any of those dojos.

Same can be said for any art. Pick a school rather than an art IMO.
 

Andrew Green

Grandmaster
MTS Alumni
Joined
Aug 1, 2004
Messages
8,628
Reaction score
448
Location
Winnipeg MB
Growing up, I always thought the martial arts I saw in movies was cool, but I am afraid of "bullshido" studios that are just in it for the money.

Martial artists instructors are their own worst enemies at times.

People think they are doing the world a favour by blasting everyone that does something different, focuses on different things or makes more money then they do as being wrong, McDojo's, sell-outs, bullshido, etc.

But all they really do is give people like yourself the impression that most schools suck because, well, we are all busy slinging poop at each other and it's hard to look professional and respectable when you have poop all over your hands and face.

It's really very simple. Put it in the context of most of the crap you see online of people saying everything else is crap really comes down to the football coach saying hockey sucks, the hockey coach saying basketball sucks and the basketball coach saying football sucks.

There are some really bad instructors out there, that is true. But they tend to not last long. Find a place that has people like you doing the sorts of things you want to do and you will be fine.
 

marques

Master Black Belt
Joined
Jun 7, 2015
Messages
1,187
Reaction score
380
Location
Essex, UK
There are some really bad instructors out there, that is true. But they tend to not last long.
I agree with all you say, except this bit. Lasting longer is more a matter of business than instruction quality or skill, I think. (I visited really poor schools - no basic knowledge about what they were doing - full of people). Also, some instructors are successful in some locations, but not in other ones. So, lasting longer is a criteria with flaws as any other.
 

hoshin1600

Senior Master
Joined
May 16, 2014
Messages
2,982
Reaction score
1,424
while i am not going to say that the okinawa-te is a bad school, it is something i would approach with a lot of reservations and skepticism.
you can google Gordon Doversola. he maybe studied kenpo under Mitose. but then created his own version of kenpo.
youtube is wonderfull.

i am sure these clips will leave even our member here Chris Parker speechless

there is really nothing Okinawan about it.
 

Buka

Sr. Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Jun 27, 2011
Messages
11,714
Reaction score
8,327
Location
Maui
Welcome to MartialTalk, Jakobie.

Best of luck in your search for a school.
 

Chris Parker

Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Feb 18, 2008
Messages
6,202
Reaction score
1,025
Location
Melbourne, Australia
while i am not going to say that the okinawa-te is a bad school, it is something i would approach with a lot of reservations and skepticism.
you can google Gordon Doversola. he maybe studied kenpo under Mitose. but then created his own version of kenpo.
youtube is wonderfull.

i am sure these clips will leave even our member here Chris Parker speechless

there is really nothing Okinawan about it.

No.... not speechless.... but what I would say is not entirely encouraged within the rules here... goddsdammit...
 

PhotonGuy

Senior Master
Joined
Aug 14, 2013
Messages
3,658
Reaction score
398
Hey everyone,

New member and hoping to get into a martial art. My reason for joining wasn't as much personal defense, although that's an added benefit, but more so to give me another hobby that will get me active. My goal is to become more flexible, more in control, and more disciplined.

I'd like to take part in competitions and I do like the idea of a structured progression system (but it is NOT a deal breaker). Growing up, I always thought the martial arts I saw in movies was cool, but I am afraid of "bullshido" studios that are just in it for the money.

Here are the dojos I've found in my area:

Brazilian Jiu Jutsu
http://www.graciejiujitsufabioleopoldo.com/brazilian-jiu-jitsu/

http://www.streetsportssimivalley.com/home.html

Karate

https://tsdukarate.com/

Okinawa-Te Karate | Simi Valley Martial Arts & Fitness

Hapkido/Tae Kwon Do
Jung's Martial Arts Center

Sky Martial Arts Simi Valley TaeKwonDo & HapKiDo Self Defense

I'm doing my best to see past the ******** and what looks good, but I'm hoping some members of the community who are familiar with one of these martial arts can help me out here.

Originally I was looking at Japanese Jiu Jitsu or Judo but don't see any schools in my area. I do like the idea of "traditional" martial arts, but I also want a martial art that could be used defensively at least a bit if need be.

Thanks for any and all assistance.

Do the dojos do introductory classes? If they do than I would recommend taking an introductory class at all three. Then, whichever of the three you like the best that's what you should start with. You could also watch a class at each of the three dojos. Whichever one you take up is up to you but its good to get a basic understanding of what each one teaches.
 

JR 137

Grandmaster
Joined
Apr 26, 2015
Messages
5,162
Reaction score
3,218
Location
In the dojo
while i am not going to say that the okinawa-te is a bad school, it is something i would approach with a lot of reservations and skepticism.
you can google Gordon Doversola. he maybe studied kenpo under Mitose. but then created his own version of kenpo.
youtube is wonderfull.

i am sure these clips will leave even our member here Chris Parker speechless

there is really nothing Okinawan about it.

Falls right into what I meant by there's a ton of variation even within a style. Not that I think there's anything Okinawan in that, except for the name.

Just because I'm on a watching Uechi Ryu videos kick...
Uechi Ryu techniques
 

hoshin1600

Senior Master
Joined
May 16, 2014
Messages
2,982
Reaction score
1,424
Falls right into what I meant by there's a ton of variation even within a style. Not that I think there's anything Okinawan in that, except for the name.

Just because I'm on a watching Uechi Ryu videos kick...
Uechi Ryu techniques
i havnt worked with Shinjo sensei. maybe someday. he was here in the US last year but i was unable to go. i have worked with Gushi sensei. there was a time when i wanted to move to CA to see if i could train with him. Gushi sensei has passed on now so i am glad i was able to meet him when i did.
 

JR 137

Grandmaster
Joined
Apr 26, 2015
Messages
5,162
Reaction score
3,218
Location
In the dojo
i havnt worked with Shinjo sensei. maybe someday. he was here in the US last year but i was unable to go. i have worked with Gushi sensei. there was a time when i wanted to move to CA to see if i could train with him. Gushi sensei has passed on now so i am glad i was able to meet him when i did.
Gushi sensei was one of the truly great ones. I look at him and always think "that's how it's supposed to be done."
 

WaterGal

Master of Arts
Joined
Jul 16, 2012
Messages
1,738
Reaction score
559
A big part of picking a school is going to come down to the instructors, staff, and community, which aren't things you can judge very well from a website. But here's my 2 cents.


Both of these look good to me, though I couldn't find anything about who the instructors are at the first school or what their credentials are. But BJJ will give you opportunities for competition and help you with the goals you mentioned, and these looks like decent places to me. (That being said, I've been doing BJJ for less than a year, so I'm not an expert.)


This is not Karate, it's Tang Soo Do. This was very light on what their program actually involves, so I can't really even make a judgement.



Okinawa-Te is a style of karate made up by an American guy. Which doesn't mean they're necessarily bad, but if "traditional" is your goal, this might not meet it. Also there is roughly zero info about their program on the site.

Hapkido/Tae Kwon Do

I've been doing both these arts for quite a few years, and will hype both of them. TKD will help you be more flexible etc, and will definitely offer you a chance to compete. Hapkido usually doesn't compete, but they will teach you self-defense. That being said, both arts also have plenty of schools that offer BS training, kiddie daycare centers, mystical mumbo-jumbo nonsense, and other dubious things.


This site seems to demonstrate a decent basic understanding of what Hapkido is, and I looked on Facebook and fast-forwarded through a video of adult training that looked fine (and also like they were incorporating some basic BJJ into the Hapkido, which I'm a fan of, since HKD traditionally has a weak ground game). I'd recommend giving these guys a call.


This appears to be a kid-focused TKD school that maybe incorporates some HKD. They might still be good, and TKD would give you more opportunity for competition, but I dunno.


My recommendation is to check out Street Sport Simi Valley and Jung's Martial Arts first, and if you're not happy with either, then check out the other BJJ place, and then go down the list from there.
 

drop bear

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Feb 23, 2014
Messages
20,823
Reaction score
5,700
Martial artists instructors are their own worst enemies at times.

People think they are doing the world a favour by blasting everyone that does something different, focuses on different things or makes more money then they do as being wrong, McDojo's, sell-outs, bullshido, etc.

But all they really do is give people like yourself the impression that most schools suck because, well, we are all busy slinging poop at each other and it's hard to look professional and respectable when you have poop all over your hands and face.

It's really very simple. Put it in the context of most of the crap you see online of people saying everything else is crap really comes down to the football coach saying hockey sucks, the hockey coach saying basketball sucks and the basketball coach saying football sucks.

There are some really bad instructors out there, that is true. But they tend to not last long. Find a place that has people like you doing the sorts of things you want to do and you will be fine.

Yes and no. There is a big issue with false validation in martial arts. People want to get better quicker and will look to styles that provide that.

Unfortunately it is almost a rule of thumb that the easier it is to achieve validation the slower you are progressing.

So if you are handling five guys you are probably training BS.

If you are not really handeling one guy. You are probably moving in the right direction.
 
Top