vunak w/ straight blasts

flashlock

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The SB is a powerful tool for sure. Vitor's is a "Boxing Blast" and I heard Bruce used it as well. Tim Tackett said there are more than a few blasts Bruce taught.

A tip to help you be more successful: It must be SET UP properly. I hear and see a lot of people trying to use the SB as an entry - that may work sometimes (anything can) but if you set it up and then "unleash" (great word!) it you'll be more effective.

Also make sure that there is constant forward pressure. If you are looping then you do not have CFP - Just as one fist clears the other should be slamming into him so that there isn't any "lag" or non-pressure.

Here's a good training tip to make sure you have CFP:

Go up to a heavy bag and extend your punch so that it moves the bag away, now begin your SB, if the bag moves towards you at any point, then you did not have CFP. Make sure your punching hand/arm/etc is driving straight into the bag, letting the hand that already hit be the one to clear the line (this assures you avoid looping).

This is just a drill obviously, since there is no footwork involved. Footwork is extremely important to transfer force and really "drive home" the CFP, still, this drill will help your upper body get the CFP down.

If you have a training partner, have him hold a focus mitt with one hand with his other hand behind it to support it. Now SB as he backs up. He should be putting pressure forward on the mit so if you do not have CFP the mitt will fall towards you and he'll feel it - he can then tell you how you did on your CFP.

As a progression, he can change tempo on his retreat (so you have to fit in) - he can also change lines, bob and weave, etc just as a real fighter may do so you can better "track" your opponent.

Just some thoughts on the SB. I love the SB as you can see :)

I know it's silly to say, but I love it too! Great comments/ suggestions, ta!
 

Dare Devil

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My understanding is that the running style footwork was created by Paul Vunak.

If you are too close or too far away, the straight blast can be problematic either way. Running is a less controled motion than a chasing step. If you get too close you shut down the efficacy of the blast. You can run yourself right into your opponent's grappling counter. If, someone manages to outrun your chasing step, you are in a position to fight from long range since you didn't deviate from bai jong all that much.

I'm not saying that running won't work, I just think there are other options that address tactical matters better in my opinion.

The way I've found to best align my punches and clear the path quickly for the next punch is to punch straight out, drop the arm and send the next punch directly over it along the same path.
 

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My understanding is that the running style footwork was created by Paul Vunak.

If you are too close or too far away, the straight blast can be problematic either way. Running is a less controled motion than a chasing step. If you get too close you shut down the efficacy of the blast. You can run yourself right into your opponent's grappling counter. If, someone manages to outrun your chasing step, you are in a position to fight from long range since you didn't deviate from bai jong all that much.

I'm not saying that running won't work, I just think there are other options that address tactical matters better in my opinion.

The way I've found to best align my punches and clear the path quickly for the next punch is to punch straight out, drop the arm and send the next punch directly over it along the same path.

Actually Bruce Lee invented it, taught it to Dan Inosanto, who, according to Vunak, taught it to Vunak.

Again, you don't just do a Vunak-style straight blast (please see my earlier post). You have to wait for the right moment, preferably when your opponent is distracted by pain--this will usually prevent counters.

You can run right into him if he stops, but then you go into the trapping/ clinch stuff.
 

Dare Devil

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I've discussed this with people who were part of the LA Chinatown group and they describe the footwork as consisting of mutliple push steps. If running works for you, then by all means run, but historically speaking the footwork was taught differently. Paul Vunak is a very talented and innovative martial artist in his own right and deserves the credit for his work. The blast is essentially the same, but his approach seems to be very much his own creation. Perhaps it's better, worse, who knows? It's all about what you do with it. However, for reasons I stated earlier, I prefer the LA Chinatown method.
 

Zaose

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I prefer a chasing step over running because I can immediately be set to do something else in case the guy falls/changes alignment/fights back/etc.

I just feel much more centered and balanced, and my forward momentum is much more controlled.
 

flashlock

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I prefer a chasing step over running because I can immediately be set to do something else in case the guy falls/changes alignment/fights back/etc.

I just feel much more centered and balanced, and my forward momentum is much more controlled.

Yeah, I can appreciate that. You give up control when you run, but you gain tremendous pressure (virtually undefenseable if set up right).
 

Zaose

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Hey Brad,

I can see that point of view. I would suggest though, that a chasing step done right along with proper forward pressure and structure - is almost as fast as a run (easily able to keep up with anyone backpeddling or falling backwards) and provides as much forward pressure as running. I've definitely experimented with running - I just get more power, control and pressure if I keep my structure with a chasing step. That's just what works for me anyway.
 

flashlock

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Hey Brad,

I can see that point of view. I would suggest though, that a chasing step done right along with proper forward pressure and structure - is almost as fast as a run (easily able to keep up with anyone backpeddling or falling backwards) and provides as much forward pressure as running. I've definitely experimented with running - I just get more power, control and pressure if I keep my structure with a chasing step. That's just what works for me anyway.

Thanks for that. Now, by "chasing step" you're referring to having one leg stay in front and kind of "gallop" forward while you punch, the classic wing chung method?

It is, from what Vunak has demonstrated, and from my own experiments, simply impossible that the chasing step shuffle you use is exploding out with even half the speed/ pressure of the 50 mitre dash down the opponent's centerline. In Vunak's first video, he has everyone do the chasing step, followed by just sprinting. The difference in speed and forward momentum is tremendous.

The only problems are 1. Risk (such a commitment) and 2. Your groin is more exposed (because when you run there is a point where it is simply more frontal).

However, if your opponent is truly distracted from our old friend Mrs. Pain, you can run right at him with your chain-punching, his training will probably fly out the window, and he'll... fall backwards or crumple awkwardly forward into your trapping/ clinch.

You'd be surprised at how fast someone can back-pedal, especially footballers and boxers.

I agree though, both are valid tools, and you have to use them correctly.
 

Infinite

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Thanks for that. Now, by "chasing step" you're referring to having one leg stay in front and kind of "gallop" forward while you punch, the classic wing chung method?

It is, from what Vunak has demonstrated, and from my own experiments, simply impossible that the chasing step shuffle you use is exploding out with even half the speed/ pressure of the 50 mitre dash down the opponent's centerline. In Vunak's first video, he has everyone do the chasing step, followed by just sprinting. The difference in speed and forward momentum is tremendous.

The only problems are 1. Risk (such a commitment) and 2. Your groin is more exposed (because when you run there is a point where it is simply more frontal).

However, if your opponent is truly distracted from our old friend Mrs. Pain, you can run right at him with your chain-punching, his training will probably fly out the window, and he'll... fall backwards or crumple awkwardly forward into your trapping/ clinch.

You'd be surprised at how fast someone can back-pedal, especially footballers and boxers.

I agree though, both are valid tools, and you have to use them correctly.

This is true I am one such quick backpeddler. I use it to draw some one in and then shift forward suddenly to put a full body strike on em.

I haven't really met anyone that can chase me down. Not that it can't or won't happen just hasn't so far. I can even do this while turning. I typically turn to the outside to make my attacker adjust. Just as he does so I spring back at him with a shot to, Kidney,Head,Eye,Kneck,Liver,Underarm

It usually works pretty well :). I do note that I have had a few keep up with me tho so I couldn't pull them out of position.

--infy
 

Dare Devil

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If my opponent is moving backward more quickly than I can move forward using push steps, and he isn't way beyond me athletically, then he's probably running away. This begs the question why I'm trying to chase him down, but for the sake of argument, I think that I would rather switch to long range fighting rather than forcing close range tactics in a situation where it doesn't really seem to fit. There may be some situation that I might run in a fight, but for the most part I think I prefer the chasing step to keep my balance better and to ease transition to other tactics.
 

Zaose

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Well said all around, good stuff.

I think it boils down to:

-Those who have put a lot of time into training the chasing step and are fast, explosive, non-telegraphic and agile can use it to great effect.

-Those who have put a lot of time into training running at your opponent and are fast, explosive, non-telegraphic and agile can use it to great effect.

Sound about right? :)
 

flashlock

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Well said all around, good stuff.

I think it boils down to:

-Those who have put a lot of time into training the chasing step and are fast, explosive, non-telegraphic and agile can use it to great effect.

-Those who have put a lot of time into training running at your opponent and are fast, explosive, non-telegraphic and agile can use it to great effect.

Sound about right? :)

Probably! I'll have to train more to find out!
 

UrBaN

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Vunak seems to be very good at what he teaches. But

What makes people like him, believe that their students will become proficient in a weekend (not only as fighters but as teachers as well!!) when it took him so many years of training?
Dont tell me its business. Thats obvious. I mean, what about his responsibility to his students? And their students?
Also, doesnt he want to be represented by quality people? If you hand out instructorships in days, how can you ensure quality?

Also I have another question. He made about 10 videos, where he talks about the exact same things.
He deals with the the untrained, the street thug. What about the trained fighters?
 

Juggernaut

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Well said all around, good stuff.

I think it boils down to:

-Those who have put a lot of time into training the chasing step and are fast, explosive, non-telegraphic and agile can use it to great effect.

-Those who have put a lot of time into training running at your opponent and are fast, explosive, non-telegraphic and agile can use it to great effect.

Sound about right? :)

Sound right to me Will...Great post...
 

JohnMarkPainter

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I trained a bit with some PFS guys and I have to say that I think they went for the Crash or Straight Blast far too often.

I was able to just stick a Lead hand or Leg out in front of me and stop hit them. Basically I would just fade back a little and hit or kick where they were about to land.

Now...if I hesitated, they were in and it was effective.
On someone that wasn't a good stop hitter and wasn't good at controlling Range, it would be effective.

jmp
 

arnisador

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Where I study PFS we do practice for that possibility--esp. someone who takes a large step back. But yes, if you goof up the timing and they can get off-line or otherwise take advantage of your forward charge!
 

JohnMarkPainter

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Funny thing...

I just read the long Paul Vunak thread.
He talks about how he USED to get hit on the way in when sparring with the upper level JKD players.

Then he put in some time on the self-perfection drills...

jmp
 
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