Useful tips for those starting out in Judo/Jujutsu...

KOROHO

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bignick said:
Just looking for some tips from those more experienced to those just starting out on what to look for and things to really pay attention to when first starting out

My first tip:

Work on ukemi.....

2nd: Ukemi
3rd: Ukemi
 

matt.m

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this goes for judo, hapkido, or jujitsu. If your favorite thing is not falling then you will certainly have a short career in any of the above arts. Take pride in your falling ability, train hard in it, make it your favorite part of practice. Also expecting to be destroyed at randori is great advice as well. However, the smart learn and study how to get beat. You judo brown and above like me, know exactly what I am talking about.
 

mariaclara

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follow your instructor and his lesson plan for you.
keep an open mind. you are here to learn. leave ur baggage at home.

most judo lesson plans are standardized. intro - dojo safety rules/etc.- course overview- warmup, ukemi, techniques: throws/holds,locks; uchikomi, contest rules; randori; promotions/belts; etc. cooling down. competition.

take it easy, relax enjoy.
 

Abbax8

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Back up a bit. Since this is for beginners...What's a ukemi?

Ukemi is the proper method of falling when you are thrown so you are not injured. All judo students continually train their falling skills no matter what rank they are (unless age and infirmity prevent it).

Peace

Dennis
 

JudoJunkie

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After you master falling, remember to be kind and considerate to your partner when practicing. Judo is not a sport you can learn by yourself. If you are considerate to your partner, hopefully they will return the favor.
 

L-Pro

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Ukemi (falls, rolls, etc.) is essential. Learn to cast away your fear of falling and throwing yourself on the ground. Your body will thank you later for learning proper ukemi.

Be relaxed while practicing and learn to execute techniques effortlessly. "Jujutsu becomes easy when it ceases to be hard."

Have fun while practicing and do not let ego interfere. Don't be hard on yourself when you don't execute a technique perfectly or this will interfere with your mind and body working as one. Drill the techniques and they will come to you.

Bring a postivie attitude and open mind to the dojo.

Be respectful of the dojo and others.
 

ScottJJ

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After my brief bout of help yesterday I will add that if you get injured do go to class and take notes. Its amazing what you will see as an observer.
 

Mark Jordan

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Judo and jujutsu have a common root, but the way they are practiced today are very different. For someone just starting out, I would highly recommend that you pick one or the other, but do not try to learn both at the same time. The differences will lead to confusion that will hinder your progress in both. If your interest is in competition, go with judo. If you are seeking only to learn an effective form of self defense, you can't go wrong with jujutsu (jujitsu).

Let me be clear. I'm not saying you should never train in judo and jujutsu at the same time. After practicing one long enough to fully understand its principles, then it's OK to take up the other. Take it from someone who holds rank in both judo and jujutsu

A BEGINNER should NOT try to learn both at the same time.
 

Koryu82

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Hi everyone.. First and foremost I am glad I found a discussion group that could possibly help me in finding some training in a Koryu martial art. I currently reside in Virginia. I have bounced around from Dojo to Dojo in search of something not really knowing what I am in search of. I have done a good deal of research on Taijutsu and found I am torn between the Jinenkan and the Genbukan organization's. Any feed back on these two? Also does any one know whom, if any one that is training these arts in Virginia specifically Richmond and surrounding areas( I am looking for true Kobudo, nothing watered down). Any help is greatly appreciated.
Regards,
Christan Smith
 

Grasshopper22

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As you said, work on breakfalls and just generally learn the etiquette (e.g. to bow to your sensei after each demonstration he/she gives you, when you enter the training area (usually mats)). Other than that just pay attention to the positions of the instructor/sensei's feet, hands etc when he/she's showing you a technique. Usually your sensei will say "Note the position of my hand..." or something along those lines. But the most important thing is to learn and to enjoy yourself! :D
 

TapouT

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Im still a white belt and new at this but heres what helps me

When falling make sure you hit your palm on the mat so your here the pop (like they were saying)

KEEP YOUR HEAD UP! Dont let it hit the mat when you fall, it hurts and Ive done it several times (yeah its obvious but when your falling you dont think about it)

And when your going to sleep, or not in class, think about every step of the throw or move you learned.. that way you wont forget it and it will get stuck in ur head

:) These things helped meee
 

Langenschwert

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Choose your sparring partners very carefully. Judo is a full-contact sport and some people simply don't care about the safety of those they do randori with. I say this as I'm laid up for two months with a broken fibula from Judo which you could hear snap halfway across the dojo. If your spidey sense goes off (as mine did), just politely decline (like I did not).

-Mark
 

Kung Fu Wang

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IMO, the following strategies should work well.

- Try to spend 80% of your effort not to let your opponent to get any grip on you.
- Try to have a grip on your opponent but he has no grip on you, or have 2 grips on him but he has only 1 grip on you.
- If both you and your opponent has 2 grips on each other, try to give up your grips by tearing apart his grips and end with you have 1 grip but he has no grip.

Here is an example how to tear your opponent's grip apart.

 
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