Silent video

Kung Fu Wang

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I like silent video with no audio because I believe action is better than words.

For example, in the following clip, I truly don't know what audio that he should add into his video. He can say,

- step in between your opponent's legs,
- push the shoulder, and
- pull the leg.

But the action has already explained it all. If the video is converted into a GIF file that can be repeated over and over, that's even better.

What's your opinion on this?

 
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Kung Fu Wang

Kung Fu Wang

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You can find many videos online that has more audio than action. Also if you try to explain something while you are doing, your action speed will not be normal, and your video won't look realistic (such as to ask your opponent to freeze his puncing arm in the air while you are talking).

Which way is better in your opinion?
 
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Tony Dismukes

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Explanations (whether through audio or text) can point out lots of subtle details in the motion that most people will miss. They can also inform the student as to the reasons behind a given technique, the correct time and place to use the technique, and the underlying principles of the technique which map on to other techniques.

That said, you do also need some reps of the demonstration where you just go all the way through at speed so that the viewer can see the entire movement as a whole without interruption.
 

Holmejr

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Audio or not, most every technique or concept has its moment. I take the hop on the foot to mean a bit off balance OR he was not accustomed to isolating the technique. Otherwise, good stuff!
 
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Kung Fu Wang

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Explanations (whether through audio or text) can point out lots of subtle details in the motion that most people will miss. They can also inform the student as to the reasons behind a given technique, the correct time and place to use the technique, and the underlying principles of the technique which map on to other techniques.
I think we have different purpose for creating video. Your video is for teaching. My video is for "record information" (not for teaching purpose). In other words, if people can't understand the silent video, that's not my concern.

This video shows the other extreme.

 
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Kung Fu Wang

Kung Fu Wang

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I take the hop on the foot to mean a bit off balance OR he was not accustomed to isolating the technique. Otherwise, good stuff!
It's good that you have noticed that. In Chinese wrestling, it's called "dynamic rooting" that you regain your balance after you have lost through your over committed forward momentum.

 
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windwalker099

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I think we have different purpose for creating video. Your video is for teaching. My video is for "record information" (not for teaching purpose). In other words, if people can't understand the silent video, that's not my concern.


Agree in principel....

If one can not understand what they see, they'er probably to far away to understand by explanation

One the things I often comment on,
,people write or talk about things..
When it's shown what they've just written or talked about,
they tend to lose their minds
 
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JowGaWolf

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I like silent video with no audio because I believe action is better than words.

For example, in the following clip, I truly don't know what audio that he should add into his video. He can say,

- step in between your opponent's legs,
- push the shoulder, and
- pull the leg.

But the action has already explained it all. If the video is converted into a GIF file that can be repeated over and over, that's even better.

What's your opinion on this?

Things that don't this video doesn't answer.
1. When do you try to apply the technique?
2. What is the best way to set up the technique?
3. Are you pushing his shoulder with your hand or are you pushing across his sternum with the forearm?
4. Are you pushing or are you just moving forward?
5. When you are grabbing the knee are you lifting it towards the center or are you lifting it to your outside?
6. What is the follow up after this to prevent from being up kicked?
7. Does this work on someone who is taller than you?
8 Does this work on someone who is heavier than you.
9. What are the failing points of where the technique won't work ? Will it work if I lift the leg then push?
10. Does this work if the person is standing up in a higher stance with feet closer together?
11. Is there a recovery for when a person messes up the technique or misses the timing for the technique?
12. Will this technique work when punching and kicking are allowed? If so then how does it need to be used in that context?

Video can be deceptive because it makes us think there's nothing more beyond what we see. Even something as simple as a jab has at least two chapters worth of describing the things that are going on beyond seeing a jab.

People see me hit the heavy bag really hard with my fists. They then try to do the same thing and as a result they injure their hands within 10 punches or less. They see me hit the bag soft (when I do knuckle conditioning) and they do the same thing but with boxing gloves on, which doesn't help them or knuckles. While video is good. A video of me doing baby punches on a knuckle bag without context is just useless video.

This is a video of how I workout. I made this video for myself and not as a response to anything said in this group. The majority of the people who see this video would think that my workout sucks. They won't be impressed. They won't see any use of it. There's no way to tell what I'm actually focusing on or when I'm focusing on it. People can try to copy what they see and miss all of the important things that they should be focusing on when doing this type of training.

"A picture is worth a thousand words" - that's usually because there's no context. Add context and that picture is worth only what was said in context.
 

Tigerwarrior

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I like silent video with no audio because I believe action is better than words.

For example, in the following clip, I truly don't know what audio that he should add into his video. He can say,

- step in between your opponent's legs,
- push the shoulder, and
- pull the leg.

But the action has already explained it all. If the video is converted into a GIF file that can be repeated over and over, that's even better.

What's your opinion on this?

Where do you find all these video clips? It's always good stuff. I like the technique in the video.
 

JowGaWolf

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if you try to explain something while you are doing, your action speed will not be normal, and your video won't look realistic (such as to ask your opponent to freeze his puncing arm in the air while you are talking).
This is why it's good to explain what has already been done. All of my videos show me using the technique either in sparring or training. This gives me a better example to use for teaching. I prefer this method for understanding a technique. The other method works better if you don't have video to use or to cover more details about smaller components that make a technique work.
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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I think we have different purpose for creating video. Your video is for teaching. My video is for "record information" (not for teaching purpose). In other words, if people can't understand the silent video, that's not my concern.

This video shows the other extreme.

What about when you forget something? Some key detail that's not obvious just from watching? At that point the information may be recorded, but is not useful.
 
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Kung Fu Wang

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1. When do you try to apply the technique?
2. What is the best way to set up the technique?
3. Are you pushing his shoulder with your hand or are you pushing across his sternum with the forearm?
4. Are you pushing or are you just moving forward?
5. When you are grabbing the knee are you lifting it towards the center or are you lifting it to your outside?
6. What is the follow up after this to prevent from being up kicked?
7. Does this work on someone who is taller than you?
8 Does this work on someone who is heavier than you.
9. What are the failing points of where the technique won't work ? Will it work if I lift the leg then push?
10. Does this work if the person is standing up in a higher stance with feet closer together?
11. Is there a recovery for when a person messes up the technique or misses the timing for the technique?
12. Will this technique work when punching and kicking are allowed? If so then how does it need to be used in that context?
The silent video only shows such technique exist. One still need an instructor to learn the detail.
 
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Kung Fu Wang

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What about when you forget something? Some key detail that's not obvious just from watching? At that point the information may be recorded, but is not useful.
A beginner student may look at the technique. The more advance student may look at the strategy.

This clip shows "attack one leg, when you opponent steps back, you then attack his other leg". This strategy can be shown in many different techniques. But if one understands the strategy, you don't need to have 10 more clips to show the same strategy.

In other words, the purpose of a silent video is not to teach the technique but to record a strategy.



This silent clip shows a simple strategy - leg is longer than the arm. It's not trying to teach how to do a front kick.

What audio do you think is needed?

upload pics
 
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JowGaWolf

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A beginner student may look at the technique. The more advance student may look at the strategy.

This clip shows "attack one leg, when you opponent steps back, you then attack his other leg". This strategy can be shown in many different techniques. But if one understands the strategy, you don't need to have 10 more clips to show the same strategy.

In other words, the purpose of a silent video is not to teach the technique but to record a strategy.



This silent clip shows a simple strategy - leg is longer than the arm. It's not trying to teach how to do a front kick.

What audio do you think is needed?

upload pics
Video with no context leaves the door open to assumptions as to the strategy and focus in which the video is being used.

Are you showing to kick when a person moves forward or are you showing to kick when a person attacks. One is safer than the other. One leaves you open to being countered.
 
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Kung Fu Wang

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Are you showing to kick when a person moves forward or are you showing to kick when a person attacks. One is safer than the other. One leaves you open to being countered.
It just records a strategy/principle. How to apply this strategy/principle is up to the individual.

So if you know that leg is longer than the arm, you should know when and how to take advantage on that.
 
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Jared Traveler

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I have used something similar to this in Sambo many times. It meets the basic "high/low" principle needed to take someone down.

However in Sambo/wrestling, it is done by applying high/low force at an angle, not taking him straight back. It is also done with more control, by taking a different grip with the high hand. Either an under hook, or pushing on the side of his neck.

In Muay Thai this is done (again at an angle) when an opponent tries to knee you in the clinch.

I think regarding the first video, that can work. But there are much more effective ways to do the same simple concept. Primarily by modifying your hand placements and angle of force used.
 
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Kung Fu Wang

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not taking him straight back. ... pushing on the side of his neck. ... modifying your hand placements and angle of force used.
You are absolute right. Someone told me that there is a MA book, "81 different ways to seize your opponent's leading leg". I still have not found that book yet.

In the following clip, he

1 Attacking angle - lines up his back foot with both of his opponent's feet. When he attacks through that angle, it's difficult for his opponent to escape the leading leg (also stay away from his opponent's back hand punch).

2. Contact point - pushes on his opponent's neck instead (this contact pont is used more often in no-jacket wrestling).

3. Force direction - uses circular force instead of straight line backward force.

4. Borrow force - use pull before push.

 

Jared Traveler

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You are absolute right. Someone told me that there is a MA book, "81 different ways to seize your opponent's leading leg". I still have not found that book yet.

In the following clip, he

1 Attacking angle - lines up his back foot with both of his opponent's feet. When he attacks through that angle, it's difficult for his opponent to escape the leading leg (also stay away from his opponent's back hand punch).

2. Contact point - pushes on his opponent's neck instead (this contact pont is used more often in no-jacket wrestling).

3. Force direction - uses circular force instead of straight line backward force.

4. Borrow force - use pull before push.

That looks like Te Guruma in judo. Which is a great throw.
 
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Kung Fu Wang

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Where do you find all these video clips? It's always good stuff. I like the technique in the video.
If you google "頝日", you will find some good videos.

 

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