Question for new students

paperguynj

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i just started BJJ and really enjoy it. The school I go to is a great school with top notch instructors. One of my questions is about injuries. My fingers hurt so bad as do my toes and feet. Is this normal? Will it get better?
 

Andrew Green

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First of all relax, good chance you trying to maintain death grips on partners gi's and it's hard on the fingers. You're new and learning, not in competition. First rule of training is protect yourself, letting go of a grip or tapping early to prevent suffering the next morning is always a good idea.

I'm assuming your feet are mat burn? You will likely sort that out soon enough as well, part of it is your body getting used to what it is doing, part of it is learning how to move properly so that you aren't getting mat burn all the time.

If your feet are really bad tape, or even just socks until they heal.
 

Gerry Seymour

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First of all, welcome to Martial Talk!

Others have made good points, so I won't toss more in without knowing much. What kind of pain are you having in hands and feet? If it's muscular, that'll continue off and on only until your muscles get used to the activity. If it's joints, check with your doctor about what's going on, because you shouldn't have a lot of joint pain after your first few BJJ classes. I'd expect some in my feet, but I have arthritis that's often aggravated by ground work.
 

Deafdude#5

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Typically, Id say yes. Muscle aches & soreness goes hand in hand with grappling type activities. Intense muscle contractions for long periods can leave you feeling sore for a couple of days.

Do ease up a bit if you can & relax.

Do get yourself checked for joint issues though.
 

CrazedChris

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Although I am not familiar with BJJ itself, I see that you are about my age and starting out. :) As long as it isn't joint pain you need to have checked out, you are going to experience some discomfort and aches, especially if doing different stances on your feet and toes that aren't in the norm for your everyday activities.
Like the others mentioned, relax, and be sure you are stretching well, before and after.
And, welcome. :)
 

PiedmontChun

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You might be gripping really hard and your hand strength / conditioning has not caught up yet. I agree with the earlier comment to try and relax a little bit. My hands hurt sometimes after serious rolling but its nothing terrible or unbearable. Knowing what you are doing with your grip is important. I'm just a white belt, but a light bulb when on when my coach pointed this out - for a given position or transition, are you "pushing" or "pulling" with the gi grip? Sometimes you need to pull to break someone's posture down and restrict opponent's movement, and sometimes you need to use your grip to push and keep space, but trying to keep an excessive death grip on someone's gi without being efficient just wears your hands out.
As for feet, my toes used to hurt learning to sprawl out, and from working side control positions that required using the feet / toes to "walk" your body into your training partner. You are likely using muscles in your feet in ways you have never used them before, there is some conditioning there to be built up. Give it a month, try relaxing on grips, and just embrace that you are building stronger feet.
 

Danny T

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1. The learning curve in BJJ is long.
2. Beginners tend to Fight using strength vs relaxing and using technique because they don't really know what to do or how to so did properly therefore they fight. Quit fighting and play.
3. Learn to survive first rather than winning. Learn the hierarchy of positions, how to maintain control in those positions, then start learning how to attack.

You are using your body in a different manner and therefore muscles and joints are taxed in a different manner so they may well be sore.
Survive, Position, Control, Execution. Stop fighting, have fun playing Jiu Jitsu, and you will grow much quicker.
 

Gerry Seymour

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1. The learning curve in BJJ is long.
2. Beginners tend to Fight using strength vs relaxing and using technique because they don't really know what to do or how to so did properly therefore they fight. Quit fighting and play.
3. Learn to survive first rather than winning. Learn the hierarchy of positions, how to maintain control in those positions, then start learning how to attack.

You are using your body in a different manner and therefore muscles and joints are taxed in a different manner so they may well be sore.
Survive, Position, Control, Execution. Stop fighting, have fun playing Jiu Jitsu, and you will grow much quicker.
By the way, I've heard this said a lot about starting in BJJ ("learn to survive first") and I just love it. Just wanted to say that.
 

drop bear

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There is a special grip. Go on YouTube. You also may be able to train in wrestling shoes. Which will protect your feet until they harden up.
 
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