Prefacing a sentence with…

Gyakuto

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I’ve been noticing people being interviewed on news programmes (politicians in particular), prefacing their sentences in such a way as to imply the listener is somehow deficient in their cognitive abilities. It’s being passive-aggressive. So I’ve compiled a list if my personal pet-peeves, the first one being the one I loathe in particular. Do you have any other examples?

Look
It means you're trying to convince someone of something that they feel is blazing ly obvious but you cannot see it. It suggests frustration or losing patience at their inability to see things from your personal (correct) perspective.

To be honest
This a red flag for your listeners because it makes them wonder if you’ve only just started telling the truth. Was everything you previously stated a lie? When we add a preface, or we feel we need to add something after we’ve made a statement, it could appear as not credible.

No offence
…pretty much equals “here comes an offensive comment.”

Well, actually
Just say no to this sentence-opener, which can turn you into a condescending over-explainer in only two words. Your listener hears: “I’m right and you’re wrong.” Now, this could be the case if you are presenting a point of fact, but before an opinion…non.

This may sound stupid
‘This may be a silly question‘ and ‘I may be wrong here, but…’
There’s no ‘may’ about it: Once you’ve introduced a negative quality, like ‘stupid’ or ‘wrong,’ you can’t take it back. Your listeners are already assuming that yes, you’re not too bright.

I’m not racist/sexist, but…
It negates your previous clause, ‘Here comes a racist whopper.” That’s never a good way to start (or continue) a conversation

As I previously stated
This is a great way to sound passive-aggressive, suggesting the you are not being listened to. Either that or you are trying to lay claim to an idea or a thought—but again, in an unnecessarily aggressive way. Of course, if you’re not being listened to, this is a good phrase to snap a person’s attention back onto the matter in hand.
 

tkdroamer

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I’ve been noticing people being interviewed on news programmes (politicians in particular), prefacing their sentences in such a way as to imply the listener is somehow deficient in their cognitive abilities. It’s being passive-aggressive. So I’ve compiled a list if my personal pet-peeves, the first one being the one I loathe in particular. Do you have any other examples?

Look
It means you're trying to convince someone of something that they feel is blazing ly obvious but you cannot see it. It suggests frustration or losing patience at their inability to see things from your personal (correct) perspective.

To be honest
This a red flag for your listeners because it makes them wonder if you’ve only just started telling the truth. Was everything you previously stated a lie? When we add a preface, or we feel we need to add something after we’ve made a statement, it could appear as not credible.

No offence
…pretty much equals “here comes an offensive comment.”

Well, actually
Just say no to this sentence-opener, which can turn you into a condescending over-explainer in only two words. Your listener hears: “I’m right and you’re wrong.” Now, this could be the case if you are presenting a point of fact, but before an opinion…non.

This may sound stupid
‘This may be a silly question‘ and ‘I may be wrong here, but…’
There’s no ‘may’ about it: Once you’ve introduced a negative quality, like ‘stupid’ or ‘wrong,’ you can’t take it back. Your listeners are already assuming that yes, you’re not too bright.

I’m not racist/sexist, but…
It negates your previous clause, ‘Here comes a racist whopper.” That’s never a good way to start (or continue) a conversation

As I previously stated
This is a great way to sound passive-aggressive, suggesting the you are not being listened to. Either that or you are trying to lay claim to an idea or a thought—but again, in an unnecessarily aggressive way. Of course, if you’re not being listened to, this is a good phrase to snap a person’s attention back onto the matter in hand
I agree with all of them but the last one. "As I previously stated" can be anything from "hey knucklehead, are you actually reading the commentary", to CYA, to genuinely trying to give someone the benefit of a doubt.

Oh, by the way... comes to mind. It can be in an attempt to prove a point, or to completely change the subject.
 
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Gyakuto

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Look... Gyakuto... to be honest, no offence... well, actually.. this may sound stupid.. I'm NOT racist, but as I previously stated.. I'm unclear what I'm saying.
Nobody likes a flippin’ clever-clogs 😑
 

Rich Parsons

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I’ve been noticing people being interviewed on news programmes (politicians in particular), prefacing their sentences in such a way as to imply the listener is somehow deficient in their cognitive abilities. It’s being passive-aggressive. So I’ve compiled a list if my personal pet-peeves, the first one being the one I loathe in particular. Do you have any other examples?

Look
It means you're trying to convince someone of something that they feel is blazing ly obvious but you cannot see it. It suggests frustration or losing patience at their inability to see things from your personal (correct) perspective.

To be honest
This a red flag for your listeners because it makes them wonder if you’ve only just started telling the truth. Was everything you previously stated a lie? When we add a preface, or we feel we need to add something after we’ve made a statement, it could appear as not credible.

No offence
…pretty much equals “here comes an offensive comment.”

Well, actually
Just say no to this sentence-opener, which can turn you into a condescending over-explainer in only two words. Your listener hears: “I’m right and you’re wrong.” Now, this could be the case if you are presenting a point of fact, but before an opinion…non.

This may sound stupid
‘This may be a silly question‘ and ‘I may be wrong here, but…’
There’s no ‘may’ about it: Once you’ve introduced a negative quality, like ‘stupid’ or ‘wrong,’ you can’t take it back. Your listeners are already assuming that yes, you’re not too bright.

I’m not racist/sexist, but…
It negates your previous clause, ‘Here comes a racist whopper.” That’s never a good way to start (or continue) a conversation

As I previously stated
This is a great way to sound passive-aggressive, suggesting the you are not being listened to. Either that or you are trying to lay claim to an idea or a thought—but again, in an unnecessarily aggressive way. Of course, if you’re not being listened to, this is a good phrase to snap a person’s attention back onto the matter in hand.

Son,

Boy,

Child,

Youngster,

The Above are ageist and could be racist depending upon usage.



Civilian, (by LEOs et al - not Military)

They all appeal to authority of being more knowledgeable because of their current position.
No disrespect (seriously) to all the LEOs who do not use this, and all the FBI, Homeland, *Alphabet Soup*, Secret Service, State Police, Local Police, and the rest I have friends working for.

Those that discuss experience and use data are doing just that, and not being 100% Dismissive.


I was accused many years (Decade or so ago) that my Have a Nice Day Signature was a go .... yourself.
So anything can be interpreted any way and if one is looking they can find a way.
 

Steve

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I like this. There are a lot of rhetorical quirks like this. But some of these kinds of things are generational or regional. We tend to speak like the people around us. So if you’re around a lot of people who use a cliche, you will probably pick it up.

Same goes for jargon, like some of the things Rich mentioned.

I don’t read too much into this sort of thing, but it’s fun to think about.

Some of it, as rich pointed out, can be offensive. Generally, I have found that most people are given some grace if they use terms out of ignorance. But that won’t usually happen twice. A guy around here used to call people son and boy often as a sort of power play, even after being told it can be perceived as very racist. He kept doing it, which IMO says a lot about him.
 
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Gyakuto

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Son,

Boy,

Child,

Youngster,

The Above are ageist and could be racist depending upon usage.



Civilian, (by LEOs et al - not Military)

They all appeal to authority of being more knowledgeable because of their current position.
No disrespect (seriously) to all the LEOs who do not use this, and all the FBI, Homeland, *Alphabet Soup*, Secret Service, State Police, Local Police, and the rest I have friends working for.

Those that discuss experience and use data are doing just that, and not being 100% Dismissive.


I was accused many years (Decade or so ago) that my Have a Nice Day Signature was a go .... yourself.
So anything can be interpreted any way and if one is looking they can find a way.
Most people outside of the US find the phrase ‘Have a nice day’ grating at best.

What is a ‘LEO’?

’Civilian’ can be easily substituted with the neutral term ‘muggle’. It has no negative connotations…at all. I believe it comes from Shakespeare‘s Macbeth, ‘mony a mickle maks a muggle‘ 😐
 

Rich Parsons

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Most people outside of the US find the phrase ‘Have a nice day’ grating at best.

What is a ‘LEO’?

’Civilian’ can be easily substituted with the neutral term ‘muggle’. It has no negative connotations…at all. I believe it comes from Shakespeare‘s Macbeth, ‘mony a mickle maks a muggle‘ 😐

LEO = Law Enforcement Officer

Muggle is the term from Harry Potter series they called those without magic in a derogatory fashion.
It may have been something else before, only most will know it today for the reference above.

Derogatory - Muggle Born; as if they are not "Pure Enough" to have had two magical parents.

It was used as a statement for those without magic, yes.


In the USA, when one signs the contract with the government, they give up lots of freedoms and have more responsibilities.
The LEOs do not sign such a contract, and actually in many cases gain for freedoms, and have less responsibilities (individually)

Not officers have this attitude. Yet, many do as if they have to prove to someone (themselves and everyone they encounter) that they are better, and know more because of their position. Yet, many have not been through the situations I had as a non LEO. So they want people to listen to them because of their job title. An Appeal to authority that may not actually be present.
 
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Gyakuto

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LEO = Law Enforcement Officer
Ah...'the ol' bill'
Muggle is the term from Harry Potter series they called those without magic in a derogatory fashion.
It may have been something else before, only most will know it today for the reference above.

Derogatory - Muggle Born; as if they are not "Pure Enough" to have had two magical parents.

It was used as a statement for those without magic, yes.
😆
 

Bill Mattocks

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Ah...'the ol' bill'

😆
Much as it pains me to say this, there's something worth sharing about having spent time wearing a badge. It is my experience that the world looks like a very different place on the inside looking out. It is possible that a former LEO can have insights that fellow LEOs understand, even if they don't all agree. It's hard to identify with what a person has never experienced.

I would also say that my experience as a Marine MP was very different in many respects from civilian LE, although there are a lot of aspects that are similar enough (opinions vary on that from inside the non-veteran LE field).

And then we have the military veterans. When we speak from a place of experience of having been there and done that, it is difficult to have a peer-to-peer conversation with those who have never served. It's not just another job, and veterans understand that.

Are cops and veterans better? No. Do their opinions automatically carry more weight than a person who has never been a cop or served in the military? No; but depending on circumstances, they may, to me.

Examples are rife; from the folks who don't understand why cops don't shoot the guns out of the hands of people who are armed, to folks who think what the military does for a living is similar to self-defense.

Easy way to identify with this is to think about your experience as a martial artist and how different it is from what non-martial artists think it is we do or how things work.
 

granfire

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Most people outside of the US find the phrase ‘Have a nice day’ grating at best.

What is a ‘LEO’?

’Civilian’ can be easily substituted with the neutral term ‘muggle’. It has no negative connotations…at all. I believe it comes from Shakespeare‘s Macbeth, ‘mony a mickle maks a muggle‘ 😐
LEO = Law Enforcement Officer.
And considering Drako Malfoy.....muggle is the highest of insults to some.

Alas, with all due respect (which means to me 'go self-gratify somewhere)

'As I have previously stated' is sometimes the nicest way to tell somebody 'can't you pay attention to what was said upstream?!'
Because people do not listen. Period.

"This may sound stupid'
Is generally an attempt to minimize the speaker's knowledge. It is often used by women having to address male audiences. Cos guys feel (still) threatened by smart gals.
'to be honest' means there is no more of that ambiguous sugar coating going on. 'Look' - it means I am nearing the end of my restraint. You are about to hear the unvarnished truth, no respect intended.
'Well, actually' - a careful attempt to correct your opposite. 'this is utter BS you are telling' does not sound as nice in mixed company.

I do agree on 'I am not' and insert XYZ there.
Heck yeah, you are.
 

Tez3

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LEO = Law Enforcement Officer.
And considering Drako Malfoy.....muggle is the highest of insults to some.

Alas, with all due respect (which means to me 'go self-gratify somewhere)

'As I have previously stated' is sometimes the nicest way to tell somebody 'can't you pay attention to what was said upstream?!'
Because people do not listen. Period.

"This may sound stupid'
Is generally an attempt to minimize the speaker's knowledge. It is often used by women having to address male audiences. Cos guys feel (still) threatened by smart gals.
'to be honest' means there is no more of that ambiguous sugar coating going on. 'Look' - it means I am nearing the end of my restraint. You are about to hear the unvarnished truth, no respect intended.
'Well, actually' - a careful attempt to correct your opposite. 'this is utter BS you are telling' does not sound as nice in mixed company.

I do agree on 'I am not' and insert XYZ there.
Heck yeah, you are.
Also when a woman says 'fine' or I start posting in French or very politely, that means just go sit down.
 

_Simon_

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LEO = Law Enforcement Officer.
And considering Drako Malfoy.....muggle is the highest of insults to some.

Alas, with all due respect (which means to me 'go self-gratify somewhere)

'As I have previously stated' is sometimes the nicest way to tell somebody 'can't you pay attention to what was said upstream?!'
Because people do not listen. Period.

"This may sound stupid'
Is generally an attempt to minimize the speaker's knowledge. It is often used by women having to address male audiences. Cos guys feel (still) threatened by smart gals.
'to be honest' means there is no more of that ambiguous sugar coating going on. 'Look' - it means I am nearing the end of my restraint. You are about to hear the unvarnished truth, no respect intended.
'Well, actually' - a careful attempt to correct your opposite. 'this is utter BS you are telling' does not sound as nice in mixed company.

I do agree on 'I am not' and insert XYZ there.
Heck yeah, you are.
Mr. Malfoy needs a REEEEAL good talkin' to!
 

punisher73

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I’ve been noticing people being interviewed on news programmes (politicians in particular), prefacing their sentences in such a way as to imply the listener is somehow deficient in their cognitive abilities. It’s being passive-aggressive. So I’ve compiled a list if my personal pet-peeves, the first one being the one I loathe in particular. Do you have any other examples?

As I previously stated
This is a great way to sound passive-aggressive, suggesting the you are not being listened to. Either that or you are trying to lay claim to an idea or a thought—but again, in an unnecessarily aggressive way. Of course, if you’re not being listened to, this is a good phrase to snap a person’s attention back onto the matter in hand.
In one of my interview and interrogation classes, they discussed how the phrase "as I previously stated" can also be used for deception in an interview.

For example, if a politician is under oath and lied when they weren't under oath. Depending on how the question is phrased, they will use this phrase to repeat the lie without having to technically lie under oath. If you watch a politician getting grilled over an infraction/wrongdoing, you will see this phrase come up A LOT (For example Bill Clinton during the Monica Lewinski incident).
 

granfire

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In one of my interview and interrogation classes, they discussed how the phrase "as I previously stated" can also be used for deception in an interview.

For example, if a politician is under oath and lied when they weren't under oath. Depending on how the question is phrased, they will use this phrase to repeat the lie without having to technically lie under oath. If you watch a politician getting grilled over an infraction/wrongdoing, you will see this phrase come up A LOT (For example Bill Clinton during the Monica Lewinski incident).
interesting.
 
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Gyakuto

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Mr. Malfoy needs a REEEEAL good talkin' to!
You know, I’ve never seen any HP films. I did buy the Blu-Ray box set to see what the fuss was about, but managed half the first film and gifted the bo set to my goddaughter. Despite what everyone says, it is for children.

Never seen Top Gun either…or Citizen Cane….
 
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Gyakuto

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In one of my interview and interrogation classes, they discussed how the phrase "as I previously stated" can also be used for deception in an interview.

For example, if a politician is under oath and lied when they weren't under oath. Depending on how the question is phrased, they will use this phrase to repeat the lie without having to technically lie under oath. If you watch a politician getting grilled over an infraction/wrongdoing, you will see this phrase come up A LOT (For example Bill Clinton during the Monica Lewinski incident).
I’m very dubious of such claims otherwise every lie or half-truth would relatively easily be uncovered.The interviewee might just be inarticulate or very stressed (likely) etc. Post-hoc analysis is, by it’s nature, very accurate…the retrospectivescope is a very powerful instrument! But advanced predictions are in the realm of clairvoyance.
 

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You know, I’ve never seen any HP films. I did buy the Blu-Ray box set to see what the fuss was about, but managed half the first film and gifted the bo set to my goddaughter. Despite what everyone says, it is for children.

Never seen Top Gun either…or Citizen Cane….
Haha, you missed out. The first film is VERY tame. It gets much darker and adult-like after that one. Best movies!
 
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Gyakuto

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Haha, you missed out. The first film is VERY tame. It gets much darker and adult-like after that one. Best movies!
Nudity?😳

If I were a film maker, I’d do my very best to ensure the first of my franchise was amazing to ensnare as many as possible into the sequels.

When I go on a first date, I don’t wear scruffy training shoes, ripped jeans and go unshowered. I’m shaved, I have my Savile Row suit on and Aqua di Parma cologne and am witty and urbane to secure a second date.

Car insurance companies send me an annual quote that is considerably more expensivethan the previous year so, I go elsewhere. When they subsequently say they could’ve given me a cheaper quote I say, “Why didn’t you put that cheaper premium in your original letter?”

When I used to spar, my first counter-attack was a decisive tree-feller!

Sorry to labour the point….
 

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