Polycotton vs Cotton Gi

isshinryuronin

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"Dogi" is the term always used in Japan. After years of only hearing of "gi" here in the USA, that's the term I still use unless I'm talking to a Japanese. Don't want to be a crude Westerner. I also use "bokken."
 

opr1945

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The United States is mostly a nation of immigrants who originally did not speak English. We as a society have adopted many thing from other cultures. Sometimes the pronunciation or name changes aw we here use or adopt it. Not at all unusual. Even for adoptions from other English speaking cultures. I once hear it said that "Great Britain and the United States are two nations separated by a common language."
 

Gyakuto

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"Dogi" is the term always used in Japan. After years of only hearing of "gi" here in the USA, that's the term I still use unless I'm talking to a Japanese. Don't want to be a crude Westerner. I also use "bokken."
Gi is just the sort of sound a baby makes before it barfs 丐亢 Geeeee.
 

gyoja

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Gi is just the sort of sound a baby makes before it barfs 丐亢 Geeeee.
Mine always made a series of grunts first. Maybe its because they dragged their knuckles when they walked佞
 

Gyakuto

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and your point is........
Since it isnt a Japanese word, or even a word really, then either call it by its correct name(s) or call it training gear or yogurt on your foot地nything but gheeee 丐亢
 
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Hot Lunch

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Okay, got a problem... I've seen other people with this issue over the years, and I've never had it myself until now. Little greenish-brown dots around the upper lapel/collar area - i.e., mold. Other people who've had this issue don't seem to care, but I'm secretly judging such people. Can the mold be removed, or is it time to retire the gi (after only 14 months of use)?
 

Gyakuto

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It can be remove. your friend is a toothbrush to rub these things into the mould.

White Distilled Vinegar An excellent mould-killer, diluted vinegar can be worked directly into the stain or you can pre-soak the clothing in a bucket of water mixed with one cup of vinegar. You can also add 1-2 cups of vinegar to your washing machine per cycle to kill any mildew odours and brighten your whites.

Hydrogen Peroxide Mix 1 part 20% hydrogen peroxide with 4 parts water to create a solution. This should only be used on organic fabrics (cotton, linen, etc.) that arent flame-resistant or dont have easy-care finishes.

Borax This water-soluble mineral is also a natural mould-killer, which you can buy as a detergent or in powder form. If you get it as a powder, mix half a cup of borax thoroughly with hot water according to instructions. Then add the solution directly into the drum of your washing machine, and launder the clothes as normal.

You could try bleach in the form of Miltons but use sparingly and rub it in with an old or your wifes toothbrush.
A523AC60-8BF8-4B03-81BA-227E3BC3ACBF.jpeg
 

gyoja

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It can be remove. your friend is a toothbrush to rub these things into the mould.

White Distilled Vinegar An excellent mould-killer, diluted vinegar can be worked directly into the stain or you can pre-soak the clothing in a bucket of water mixed with one cup of vinegar. You can also add 1-2 cups of vinegar to your washing machine per cycle to kill any mildew odours and brighten your whites.

Hydrogen Peroxide Mix 1 part 20% hydrogen peroxide with 4 parts water to create a solution. This should only be used on organic fabrics (cotton, linen, etc.) that arent flame-resistant or dont have easy-care finishes.

Borax This water-soluble mineral is also a natural mould-killer, which you can buy as a detergent or in powder form. If you get it as a powder, mix half a cup of borax thoroughly with hot water according to instructions. Then add the solution directly into the drum of your washing machine, and launder the clothes as normal.

You could try bleach in the form of Miltons but use sparingly and rub it in with an old or your wifes toothbrush.
View attachment 31109
Good advice.
 
OP
Hot Lunch

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It can be remove. your friend is a toothbrush to rub these things into the mould.

White Distilled Vinegar An excellent mould-killer, diluted vinegar can be worked directly into the stain or you can pre-soak the clothing in a bucket of water mixed with one cup of vinegar. You can also add 1-2 cups of vinegar to your washing machine per cycle to kill any mildew odours and brighten your whites.

Hydrogen Peroxide Mix 1 part 20% hydrogen peroxide with 4 parts water to create a solution. This should only be used on organic fabrics (cotton, linen, etc.) that arent flame-resistant or dont have easy-care finishes.

Borax This water-soluble mineral is also a natural mould-killer, which you can buy as a detergent or in powder form. If you get it as a powder, mix half a cup of borax thoroughly with hot water according to instructions. Then add the solution directly into the drum of your washing machine, and launder the clothes as normal.

You could try bleach in the form of Miltons but use sparingly and rub it in with an old or your wifes toothbrush.
View attachment 31109
That reminds me: I use an oscillating electric toothbrush, and it's time to change the head anyway. I'll be sure to do this with the old one before swapping it out.
 
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