Okinawa-Te.

Cthulhu

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My instructor mentioned the article in this magazine to me, but I've yet to see it.

Cthulhu
 
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RyuShiKan

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I couldn't find the article but I am getting spamed by them.
 
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arnisador

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Originally posted by RyuShiKan

I am getting spamed by them.

Me too, and complaints have been fruitless. They're getting me both at home and at work.
 
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Pyros

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Originally posted by arnisador
Me too, and complaints have been fruitless. They're getting me both at home and at work.

Usually, when dealing with pro spammers, both complaints and unsubscribing are a no-no. Actually the opposite may happen, when you reply in any form (especially when sending an "unsubscribtion mail" as per instructed in the spam mail) you are sending them a message that this is a valid address that is read regularly!

The best way to handle these is to set your mail service or mail reader to filter out all mail from the specific address by putting it all into trash or specific spam folder. Look into your mail reader software or mail service, whichever you use. Most online mail services, like Hotmail and Yahoo provide address filtering or address blocking services for free.
 

jfarnsworth

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Does anybody have any more web sites to look up this okinawan-te art? There's only one school in my area here that does it and they didn't really represent themselves very well. I'd like to know more about the art in general so if anyone has info. it would be appreciated.
 

Cthulhu

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You could try www.okinawate.com, but it hasn't been updated in about 3 years. Like nearly every other system, there's been some political B.S. lately that's been mucking up the works.

Sigh.

Cthulhu
 

Cthulhu

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Gordon Doversola, the system founder is one. Mike Pecina is another. A ways back, a guy named Hanrahan broke off and formed a system called Wa-te Ryu, which is just Okinawa-te with a different name, really. The curriculum is just a wee bit different, and he's given Japanese names to the kata. Also, he's instituted dan rankings, which Okinawa-te does not have. Still, the essentials are basically Okinawa-te. I don't know of anyone else trying to get power in the organization, nor do I particularly care. When things get too political, I tend to shy away. Not my bag.

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arnisador

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Not having dan rankings must make it easier to avoid politics--you don't need anything they have to offer.
 

Cthulhu

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After black belt, everything depends on a combination of seniority and the amount of forms you know. There are only a couple of people who know all, or at least most, of the forms: Gordon Doversola (of course), and I believe a guy named Larry Delano. Delano seems content to teach and I don't believe he's involved with the political crap at all.

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RyuShiKan

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I was just reading over the website mentioned earlier and noticed some things.

.The early, Chinese settlers brought with them to Okinawa a primitive martial art and primarily fought amongst themselves.
I am curious as to where he got this info.
The first king of Okinawa and his successors began a period of unification and development with an increase of formal relationships with China, Japan, Korea and trade with Java, Indonesia, the Philippines and Arabia.

There were several hundered years worth of kings on Okinawa before this king mentioned here, whos name was Sho Hashi.
Sho Hashi was the first king to unify Okinawa.

In the seventeenth century, Okinawa was invaded by Japan and under Japanese authority, the Okinawans could not practice or develop martial arts. Possession of any weapon was forbidden.

King Sho Hashi had implemented a weapons ban 100 years before the Japanese ever arrived in Okinawa in 1609.

In the beginning of the nineteenth century, the island fully assimilated to Japan.

The 19th century would be the 1800s. It wasnt assimilated at all. It was still paying a yearly tribute to China until the end of the 19th century. It didnt become a prefecture (state) until 1879.
The Okinawan lang. was still used in the classroom until the 1930s

The Japanese noticed the overwhelming, physical condition and splendid physique of the Okinawan conscripts. Inquiring, they found that the Okinawans practiced the art of te. The government soon authorized the inclusion of te as physical education in schools.

Actually no. It took many years for Itosu to get Karate recognized and introduced into the school system.
The name "Okinawan te" was changed to karate-jutsu. To replace the word okinawan, kara was chosen because it represented the T'ang dynasty.

The named was actually changed from Kara (to/tang) to Kara (ku).
The former name was Ryukyu Kempo Tode Jutsu



In the 1920s, the Japanese government invited karate expert, Gichin Funakoshi, to demonstrate in Tokyo. Hence, the beginning of modern karate.


The Japanese Government did not invite him to Tokyo.Actually it was Funakoshis friend that invited him to go to Tokyo.
Funakoshi worked as a handy-man to support himself when he first arrived in Tokyo.

Also, I was wondering where this version of Okinawa te came from since I didn't see any connections to any of the schools in Okinawa. All I saw was the the founder had studied with some Kung Fu and judo people.
 

kenmpoka

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Originally posted by RyuShiKan

Also, I was wondering where this version of Okinawa te came from since I didn't see any connections to any of the schools in Okinawa. All I saw was the the founder had studied with some Kung Fu and judo people. [/B]

Good observations, I was wondering the same thing.
 
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RyuShiKan

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Originally posted by kenmpoka
Good observations, I was wondering the same thing.


I was just curious because in the past I have seen westerners claiming to be teaching Okinawa Te as in the style like Motobu Ryu.
There was even one person that claimed to be the North American Representative for Motobu Ryu but when I called the Motobu Ryu Honbu Dojo in Okinawa they said they had never heard of this person. Needless to say the person claiming this was shocked when I posted what I had found on the Internet.
This kind of thing happens every couple of yearsa new buzz word comes out in one of the Martial Arts rags and overnight everybody claims to have known about it and teaches it. When the novelty wears off another buzz word comes along and the whole things start over again. In the late 70s early 80s it was the Ninja craze, the mid 80s it was something else, in the early 90s it was yet another thing.lately I have noticed more and more Okinawa Te dojo popping up..some are teaching the real deal and some are just teaching crap that has been thrown together from other styles and they call it Okinawa Te.
This kind of activity is usually done by either a McDojo or a dojo that has thrown together a little of this or a little of that which makes it convent to slide from one popular craze to another.
 
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arnisador

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I know Okinawa-te has a specific meaning here, but doesn't it more-or-less mean "Okinawan boxing" and hence has a very generic sound? (I don't know that it's grammatically correct.) Mightn't someone open up a Karate school and put up a sign like that much as one might advertise "Chinese boxing" for a specific Kung Fu school?
 

Cthulhu

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Originally posted by RyuShiKan
I was just curious because in the past I have seen westerners claiming to be teaching Okinawa Te as in the style like Motobu Ryu.

While there is supposedly someone with the surname of Motobu somewhere in the lineage, there is no claim to any connection with Motobu Ryu.

Cthulhu
 
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RyuShiKan

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Originally posted by arnisador
I know Okinawa-te has a specific meaning here, but doesn't it more-or-less mean "Okinawan boxing" and hence has a very generic sound? (I don't know that it's grammatically correct.) Mightn't someone open up a Karate school and put up a sign like that much as one might advertise "Chinese boxing" for a specific Kung Fu school?

Like I said. I didn't see any connection to Okinawa. Only Chinese styles and judo were mentioned.
Which kind of makes the name "Okinawa Te" seem out of place.
 
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RyuShiKan

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Originally posted by Cthulhu
While there is supposedly someone with the surname of Motobu somewhere in the lineage, there is no claim to any connection with Motobu Ryu.

Cthulhu

I didn't see it mentioned in the lineage.
 

Cthulhu

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An extremely truncated lineage was mentioned in a 1960's Black Belt magazine article featuring Gordon Doversola.

Cthulhu
 
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