Noob BJJ questions...

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CrankyDragon

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I am going Tuesday nite to observe a BJJ class and have some questions before I go.

I am a little confused on some differences and origions. I understand that BJJ comes from Brazil and also Gracie. However Ive read that BJJ and GJJ are the same, but I thought they were different.

I also curious about JJ coming from Japan or Brazil? Whate are the differences, and which is the origion of JJ?

Heres the site for the school Im looking at...
http://www.hybridfighting.homestead.com/

Thanks for any help...
Andrew
 

arnisador

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Please excuse the over-simplifications here:

Jujutsu originated in Japan as a standing grappling system. It goes back at least to the 1500s as a codified style (sometimes under other names, like yawara-jutsu), and farther back in some cases. In the late 1800s, as interest in it waned, Jigaro Kano made a sport version of it, Judo, in hopes of preserving it. As Japan tried to spread its influence abroad in the early 1900s it sent many people to, among other places, Brazil. There, members of the Gracie family of Brazil studied Judo from a Japanese emigrant. The Gracies developed a system that is essentially Judo but which retains the strong emphasis on groundfighting that is much less emphasized in today's Judo practice. They believed that that made for an effective self-defense system, and also developed into a sport that is like Judo but which has rules that lead to much more time spent on the ground. The art is variously called GJJ or BJJ; the terms are essentially interchangeable, though one can draw slight distinctions between them. The practice of BJJ resembles that of Judo (or Sambo) much more than that of Jujutsu,

I've been doing BJJ and find it fun, effective, and a great workout.Give it a try! There are lots of people to give you advice on it here. Check out the Grappling forum for more info. Good luck!
 
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CrankyDragon

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Thanks much, thats pretty much the info I was looking for, very good history lesson! :)

So, its roots are in Japan, but the mainstream JJ is from Brazil, and BJJ is simply from/of/is Gracie.

I am also wondering what a typical class structure looks like. In Aikido, there is no sparing, but defense lines. Is there any "sparring" in BJJ? (Im guessing yes, but have to ask).

How effective is BJJ for personal self defense? I know this will draw a lot of opinions, but really Im looking for feedback from BJJ students. My examination of Aikido is that it has great potential for self defense, but there is not emphesis on ground fighting.

Working in corrections, Im prevy to observing many fights... an the fact is from observation, most if not all do in fact end up on the floor.

Thanks for any further info!
Andrew
 

arnisador

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There's still a lot of Japanese jujutsu around, but it's very different.

In my experience, a typical BJJ class may start with some warm-ups or rolling/falling exercises, but quickly progresses to practicing technqiues with a non-resisting partner who gradually adds a modicum of resistance. This will take up 50%-75% of the time. The rest is free-wrestling (sparring, randori). If you spentthe class working on the mount, you might be asked to start there for sparring ("working from position"); or, you may start standing up, or on your knees. (The latter is common for beginners.) Free-wrestling is very, very important in BJJ, and is the key measure of success. You'll be paired up with comparably sized folks (usually). Of course, your class may be different!

Self-defense? In my opinion, it's great for those situations where you end up on the ground. The Gracies' opinion is that this is typical; for you, it sounds like that's right! I don't think it's very effective against, say, a knifewielder. See, e.g., this thread:
http://www.martialtalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=26154

For me it's an important component of self-defense. It's what I'd use if I landed on my back. It's great...in its own arena.
 

Andrew Green

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NGAzone said:
So, its roots are in Japan, but the mainstream JJ is from Brazil, and BJJ is simply from/of/is Gracie.

Basically it's like coca-cola and generic cola.

The Gracie family retains the rights to the Gracie name, so everyone else uses "Brazillian"

I am also wondering what a typical class structure looks like. In Aikido, there is no sparing, but defense lines. Is there any "sparring" in BJJ? (Im guessing yes, but have to ask).

Every class will likely have a large chunk of time spent sparring, it is the "heart" of the system.

How effective is BJJ for personal self defense? I know this will draw a lot of opinions, but really Im looking for feedback from BJJ students. My examination of Aikido is that it has great potential for self defense, but there is not emphesis on ground fighting.

Especially since everyone means something different when they say self-defence ;)

It works in a fight, that's how they made there name famous. By fighting everyone and anyone that stepped up.
 

ajs1976

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CrankyDragon said:
I also curious about JJ coming from Japan or Brazil? Whate are the differences, and which is the origion of JJ?

When a NHB/MMA/UFC/BJJ person says jiu-jitsu, they are normally referring to Brazilian (or Gracie) Jiu-Jitsu. When someone else says Jiu-jitsu, they are normally referring to Japanese (aka Traditional) Jiu-jitsu.
 
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CrankyDragon

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Well, this leads me to a new question...

Ive been watching some borrowed videos. One appears to be made in Germany with English translation. They spell it Ju-Jutsu. The English translation sounds like Jui-Juitsu.

Whats the deal with the spelling Ju-Jutsu?? Same as BJJ??

Thanx,
Andrew
 

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Heh, actually most of the BJJ guys spell it JIU-jitsu.

Don't worry about it, it is the same as how kenpo/kempo are actually the same thing, just a slightly different translation of a Japanese word.

Lamont
 

arnisador

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It was originally transliterated into English from the Japanese as jujitsu. That's teh form you'll still find in English dictionaries. But, jujutsu is more correct given current accepted transliteration practices. I don't know why, but jiu-jitsu is common for BJJ.
 
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CrankyDragon

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Blindside said:
Heh, actually most of the BJJ guys spell it JIU-jitsu.
Thats how I ment to spell it... dang.

Crazy how the different spelling, but it makes sense.

Thanks much guys for all the help! Thanks much!!

Andrew
 

The MMA kid!

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GJJ (Gracie Jiu jitsu) is IMO, BJJ taught by the gracie academies. anyone who says that they do GJJ is or should be considered to practice direct teaching from the gracies/ gracie blackbelt.
 

Kevdak

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Heres the site for the school Im looking at...
http://www.hybridfighting.homestead.com/

I've seen the site, and the whole "[FONT=Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif]any facility that tells you they can defend multiple attackers, [/FONT][FONT=Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif]walk out[/FONT][FONT=Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif].[/FONT]" thing. I've seen people in Aikido defend 5+ attackers. IMO That guy sounds like he is on a high horse, and wants business.
 

Old Fat Kenpoka

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Heres the site for the school Im looking at...
http://www.hybridfighting.homestead.com/

I've seen the site, and the whole "[FONT=Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif]any facility that tells you they can defend multiple attackers, [/FONT][FONT=Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif]walk out[/FONT][FONT=Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif].[/FONT]" thing. I've seen people in Aikido defend 5+ attackers. IMO That guy sounds like he is on a high horse, and wants business.

Have you really seen an Aikido guy defend against 5+ attackers who were really and truly attacking?

Or did you see an Aikido guy demonstrate techniques against 5 training partners who attacked in a pre-arranged way and then cooperated as the Aikido guy executed his techniques?

There is a difference. And there are very few martial artists who can defend themselves against multiple determined, capable, and strong opponents. And there are even fewer who can teach someone else how to do that.
 

rutherford

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Heres the site for the school Im looking at...
http://www.hybridfighting.homestead.com/

I've seen the site, and the whole "[FONT=Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif]any facility that tells you they can defend multiple attackers, [/FONT][FONT=Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif]walk out[/FONT][FONT=Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif].[/FONT]" thing. I've seen people in Aikido defend 5+ attackers. IMO That guy sounds like he is on a high horse, and wants business.

Thank you for my episode of Cognitive Dissonance for the day. That quote and the fact that they have a Systema class offered twice a week at their school doesn't seem to line up very well.

Check the school out. A web page is just a web page.
 

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