Martial Talk Meetup 2024 - Kentucky

Part 02. I don't have a directional microphone, so the camera picked up all the sound in the building. I'm looking into some software that does auto captions. I increased the volume in hopes to make it easier to increase the volume. It didn't help lol. I tried to use Ai to separate the background noise and Ai couldn't make out what was being said. @Tony Dismukes will need to add some context to this
 
Okay, next time when were recording I need to turn down my music. Its good for giving me the energy to work out, but not so good for capturing instructions on video.
 
Part 02. I don't have a directional microphone, so the camera picked up all the sound in the building. I'm looking into some software that does auto captions. I increased the volume in hopes to make it easier to increase the volume. It didn't help lol. I tried to use Ai to separate the background noise and Ai couldn't make out what was being said. @Tony Dismukes will need to add some context to this
Okay, here's a quick summary of the points I was making for that basic mount escape.
  1. Being stuck on bottom of mount is very bad. The top person has a huge advantage in striking, grappling, or weapons use.
  2. Keep your elbows in tight to your ribs. When you raise your arms in an attempt to block punches, the top person can scoot up so their knees are in your armpits and then escape becomes 5x harder.
  3. To keep my opponent from smashing my face in, I want to use an upwards bridge to force him to put his hands on the ground. If he is trying to punch as I bridge, it makes it easier for me to off-balance him forward.
  4. Some people have good balance and can ride your initial bridge like a cowboy on a bucking bronco. If this happens, bring one leg up and knee them in the back to finish off-balancing them and forcing their hands to the mat. If you do this, it is important to bring the knee up while you are at the top of your bridge and their balance is precarious. Don't drop your hips back down and then try the knee. It won't work. (BTW, this knee will not inflict any significant damage. It's just for forcing their hands down.)
  5. My demo partner doesn't have a lot of jiu-jitsu experience, and on my first demo he fell over during this first step. That is what we call a false positive. Someone who has a good base will not do that. I told him to make sure he kept his balance so I could demonstrate the entire technique.
  6. Once my opponent's hands are on the mat, I immediately get to my side and hug him deeply around his upper back with one arm. My ear and the side of my face are superglued to his chest. In the video, I show how if I allow even a few inches of separation between my head and his chest, he can use his forearm to pry us apart, posture back up, then hold me down with one arm while he smashes me with the other.
  7. Once his hands are down, I'm on my right side hugging his with my left arm. I use my right arm to wrap his left arm and my right leg to trap his left ankle. (If I don't trap both his arm and leg, he can use one of those to post and stop my reversal in the next step.)
  8. Once his arm and leg are trapped. I bridge on to my right shoulder. I'm not trying to bridge straight up or to roll directly to the side. It's more like a 45 degree angle extending between my head and shoulder. Later on I went into some fine details of the body mechanics for the bridge, but that wasn't on this section of video.
  9. As I come on top, I pull my knees underneath me for base and I swim my hands to the inside of his biceps so that he can't grab my head/gouge my eyes/punch me/pull my hair/whatever.
  10. Once I'm on top with his arms controlled, I sit back to base with good posture.
  11. In a BJJ match, we would now be in a battle of guard passing vs sweeps & submissions. However in a self-defense context the odds are vanishingly low that you will be attacked by a skilled guard player. The simplest thing to do is just stand up, punch them in the face until he opens his legs, then disengage.
 
This is awesome, thanks so much @JowGaWolf :)
My pleasure. There will be quite a lot of clips to come. I'm trying to keep them at 2 minutes long. To be honest, we crammed more into the 1-hour time slot than we normally would if we were teaching a class. My guess is that the 2 minutes clips will yield a lot of discussion. Tony's quick summary is 11 points and that's the "Quick summary." :)

The first Video Tony 01 made me realize that there are two types of mobility. The mobility that one has when they are on their feet and the mobility that one has when they are on the ground but not on their feet.

I felt like a boulder when I tried those exercises. As someone who takes pride in good mobility. I fell short. So now I'm going to integrate that type mobility training into Jow Ga Kung Fu.
 
Okay, here's a quick summary of the points I was making for that basic mount escape.
  1. Being stuck on bottom of mount is very bad. The top person has a huge advantage in striking, grappling, or weapons use.
  2. Keep your elbows in tight to your ribs. When you raise your arms in an attempt to block punches, the top person can scoot up so their knees are in your armpits and then escape becomes 5x harder.
  3. To keep my opponent from smashing my face in, I want to use an upwards bridge to force him to put his hands on the ground. If he is trying to punch as I bridge, it makes it easier for me to off-balance him forward.
  4. Some people have good balance and can ride your initial bridge like a cowboy on a bucking bronco. If this happens, bring one leg up and knee them in the back to finish off-balancing them and forcing their hands to the mat. If you do this, it is important to bring the knee up while you are at the top of your bridge and their balance is precarious. Don't drop your hips back down and then try the knee. It won't work. (BTW, this knee will not inflict any significant damage. It's just for forcing their hands down.)
  5. My demo partner doesn't have a lot of jiu-jitsu experience, and on my first demo he fell over during this first step. That is what we call a false positive. Someone who has a good base will not do that. I told him to make sure he kept his balance so I could demonstrate the entire technique.
  6. Once my opponent's hands are on the mat, I immediately get to my side and hug him deeply around his upper back with one arm. My ear and the side of my face are superglued to his chest. In the video, I show how if I allow even a few inches of separation between my head and his chest, he can use his forearm to pry us apart, posture back up, then hold me down with one arm while he smashes me with the other.
  7. Once his hands are down, I'm on my right side hugging his with my left arm. I use my right arm to wrap his left arm and my right leg to trap his left ankle. (If I don't trap both his arm and leg, he can use one of those to post and stop my reversal in the next step.)
  8. Once his arm and leg are trapped. I bridge on to my right shoulder. I'm not trying to bridge straight up or to roll directly to the side. It's more like a 45 degree angle extending between my head and shoulder. Later on I went into some fine details of the body mechanics for the bridge, but that wasn't on this section of video.
  9. As I come on top, I pull my knees underneath me for base and I swim my hands to the inside of his biceps so that he can't grab my head/gouge my eyes/punch me/pull my hair/whatever.
  10. Once I'm on top with his arms controlled, I sit back to base with good posture.
  11. In a BJJ match, we would now be in a battle of guard passing vs sweeps & submissions. However in a self-defense context the odds are vanishingly low that you will be attacked by a skilled guard player. The simplest thing to do is just stand up, punch them in the face until he opens his legs, then disengage.
Thank you for this!
 

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