Martial Talk Cookbook

AngryHobbit

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All! Since we kept talking about food and reveling in various forms of cooking on Last Person thread, the idea came up to start a separate discussion for recipes and food traditions. What do martial artists eat?

I'll start. I am originally from Ukraine, where we do all manner of strange and wonderful things with food. When ingredients are either scarce or overpriced, one must be inventive and make hard-to-get foods go a long way.

I am not sure why so many people here in the United States dislike herring. Growing up in Ukraine, herring was one of the few things that were fairly easy to get: pickled, canned or smoked. Many people prepared and preserved herring their own way. In any case, it was a popular meal component, especially during big family gatherings. My favorite part was decorating the herring platter. The herring was already pre sliced, and laid out neatly head to tail. My job was to surround it with neat round slices of onions with a pickled pea in each one, representing sea pearls. Then, just for fun, I would stick a sprig of green onion or parsley into the herrings mouth.



Herring in a Fur Coat is another favorite for a celebratory table, and, despite of what you might think (Ugh, salty, slimy herring色) it is not only yummy but is also comparatively nutritious.

Ingredients:
㎜ickled filet of herring. Filet costs more, but trust me youll thank yourself later, when you dont have to deal with the tiny snappy herring bones. The quantity depends on the container, in which you buy it and on how salty you want the dish to be. Lets say get enough to fill a small mixing bowl about two cups worth.
㎡wo medium-size potatoes.
㎡hree large carrots.
㎡wo large beets or two cans of pre-sliced canned beets (not pickled just the regular canned ones).
㏕ne large onion (I prefer Vidalia).
㏕ne large apple.
﹪ayo


Prep:
$ook potatoes, carrots and beets (if using raw beets).
﹩et the veggies cool and then peel (much easier once they are cooked).
$hop the onions.
$hop the herring as finely as you can.
㏎hred potatoes, carrots and beets on the finest side of your shredder (for the uninitiated thats the side with the smallest holes in it).
㎜eel and core the apple, then shred it on the medium side of the shredder.
@n a large flat serving dish, lay out the shredded potatoes in a nice even layer, then smear with a thin layer of mayo.
/dd a layer of herring, smear with mayo. (Are you getting a hang of this yet?)
/dd a layer of onion. Nope, no mayo not yet.
/dd a layer of carrots, then smear with mayo.
/dd a layer of apple, smear with mayo.
/dd a layer of beets, and spread it to cover both the top and the sides, if possible.
¥ecorate any way you want with some peas and carrots, with sprigs of parsley or other herbs.
㎜lace into the fridge for three hours to chill. You can eat it right away, but it is so much yummier when all the flavors had a chance to sort of merge together.
㏎erve as you would a layered cake with a large spatula or actually with a cake server.
 
@granfire, here are some things you definitely CANNOT prepare at work.

Pirozhki

Dough
  • 5 cups of flour,
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tablespoons of salt
  • 1 tablespoon of sugar
  • 3 teaspoons of yeast
  • 1-1/2 sticks of butter, plus water as the mixing process commences.
  1. Measure out flour into a large mixing bowl and add salt, sugar, and yeast.
  2. Melt the butter and fold into the flour. Mix thoroughly.
  3. Break the egg into a drinking glass and add water to fill the glass, mix thoroughly. Add to the flour and mix thoroughly.
  4. Start adding water and flour and kneading the dough until it is smooth and elastic.
  5. Chill the dough for 30 minutes.
Stuffing

Anything you want. You can make them savory or sweet. My favorite versions are:
  • Cabbage sauteed with onions and smoked sausage.
  • Mashed potatoes, mushrooms, and onions.
  • Apples, ham, and cheddar.
Start breaking out pieces of dough and rolling them out into circles about 4" in diameter. Fill each circle with stuffing and pinch the edges close. Lay out on the baking sheet and brush with a mix of cream and egg.

Bake 30 minutes at 400 degrees F.
 
@granfire - here is another one.

Totally random potato salad

Ingredients:
  • 3 very tired potatoes the kind you have left in the basket (or wherever you normally store potatoes) that tell you its time to just get more potatoes)
  • 翻 of a large onion used the other half for saut矇ing here and there.
  • 1/2 jar of pickled beets again, used the beets elsewhere and then forgot I had this jar already open.
  • 2 tablespoons of sweet pickle cubes scraped off the bottom of the jar of Mt. Olive pickle cubes. If you dont know what Mt. Olive is, you havent lived.
  • 翹 of a bag of frozen veggie mix carrots, beans, broccoli, whatever else was in that bag. Its colorful, so I use it.
  • 2 tablespoons of mayo scraped off the bottom of the mayo jar because I didnt want to open the new jar just yet.

Preparation:
  1. Peel and boil the tired potatoes until you can run a fork through them. If you dont feel like it, you actually dont have to peel them thats fine. Potato skins are edible. Just cut out the eyes and outright potato sprouts, because having potato plants in your salad is just not cool.
  2. While the potatoes are cooking, chop the onion into small pieces and saut矇 it with frozen veggies. Use olive oil to saut矇 that way you can dump the whole thing into the salad, without having to worry about the dressing. I love butter and all, but it can get a bit too well buttery, when you saut矇 veggies on it and then add them to a salad.
  3. Find a nice big bowl to start dumping things into with enough room to mix everything.
  4. Chop the pickled beets and throw them into the bowl.
  5. As soon as the potatoes are ready, douse them with cold water. Keep at it until they are cooled enough to handle without having to make a donation to a local burn unit.
  6. Chop the potatoes coarsely (if you dont know what that means, you havent been reading my column its your own fault, figure it out) and add them to the bowl.
  7. Add saut矇ed onions and veggies to the bowl.
  8. Add pickle cubes and start mixing.
  9. Add mayo and keep mixing until everything looks nice and uniform.
  10. Put in the fridge for 2-3 hours to chill.
  11. Eat.
 
@granfire - and another one.

Cold Red Borshch

(For a large pot about 1 gallon in capacity)

- 2 large potatoes
- 3 decent-size carrots
- 1 small head of cabbage (not lettuce - not the same thing!)
- 1 large raw beet or (for speed purposes) 2 cans of small whole beets<
- 1/2 large onion (I use Vidalia)
- your favorite herbs and spices (I use rosemary, basil, one or two bay leaves, ground black pepper, regular salt and onion salt)
- sour cream

Making a borshch is a fairly labor-intensive and messy process. So, wear an apron and engage some friends and femily to help you peel and chop everything.

Fill the pot with water about 2/3 of the way and put on low-to-medium heat. Peel the potatoes, chop into 1/2" cubes and drop into the pot. Peel the carrots, chop into circles about 1/8" thick, drop into the pot. (Notice - we are adding vegetables gradually, because some of them take longer to cook. Potatos and carrots are the hardest of the lot, so we add them first.) Wash the cabbage and peel off and discard the wilted leaves. Slice it into large pieces first, then chop finely and add to the pot. (I usually can't resist eating a few cabbage leaves raw - they are good for you!) Chop up the onion and add to the mix.

Potatos, carrots, onions and cabbage make up the bulk of your borshch. This is a good time to start adding your herbs and spices and mixing everything up thoroughtly. Make sure to taste the liquid in the pan - potatos and carrots do absorb salt, so you may need to add a little more salt gradually to make sure your borshch doesn't taste flat. Increase the heat to medium, but don't let it boil - it has to cook slowly to ensure all the flavors seep into the mix and combine.

If you are using a raw beet, peel and shred it. Or, pop your two cans of whole beets and shred them. Add the shredded beets to the borshch. If you are using canned beets, feel free to add the beet juice to the mix as well - it will make the color that much prettier. Add a few pinches of onion salt. (Yes, we do already have some onions in there, but onion salt really enhances the flavor of the beets.)

By this time, your pan has been simmering for 45 minutes to an hour. Grab a fork, fish out a few pieces of potato and/or carrot and taste them to see whether they are cooked. Taste the liquid and add more herbs and spices if you are not completely satisfied with the flavor. If the potatos and carrots are cooked and the flavor is to your satisfaction, turn off the stove, cover the pot and let it sit for a couple of hours. Then put it in the fridge to cool. Serve cold with a dollop of sour cream and a sprig of parsley on top.

Sauteed beets

(Use as a side when you don't feel like making a salad. These quantities serve 2 people - just do the math if you need more.)

- 1 can of whole beets
- 1/4 stick of butter or 2-3 spoons of olive oil
- Onion salt and ground black pepper to taste
- Sharp cheese or sour cream to taste

Shred the beets. Heat up the butter or olive oil in a small pan (I use the small cast iron pan, but if you want to cheat and use non-stick, it's up to you) on low heat. Add the beets and 1/4 cup of the beet juice from the can. Sautee on low-to-medium heat, stirring constantly. As the juice start boiling out, add onion salt and black pepper and mix thoroughly. Put the heat back on low, cover the pan and cook for a couple more minutes.

If you are using sharp cheese, use this time to shred the cheese. If not, just sit on your hands.

Remove the cover from the pan and make sure most of the juice is gone. Add a little bit more onion salt and stir. Don't let the beets get scorched - it really ruins the taste!

Serve as a side with whatever else you are having for dinner. Either put the beets into one large dish and cover with shredded cheese or with sour cream on top or put on individual plates and garnish with cheese or with a dollop of sour cream. Enjoy!
 
@granfire, here are some things you definitely CANNOT prepare at work.

Pirozhki

Dough
  • 5 cups of flour,
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tablespoons of salt
  • 1 tablespoon of sugar
  • 3 teaspoons of yeast
  • 1-1/2 sticks of butter, plus water as the mixing process commences.
  1. Measure out flour into a large mixing bowl and add salt, sugar, and yeast.
  2. Melt the butter and fold into the flour. Mix thoroughly.
  3. Break the egg into a drinking glass and add water to fill the glass, mix thoroughly. Add to the flour and mix thoroughly.
  4. Start adding water and flour and kneading the dough until it is smooth and elastic.
  5. Chill the dough for 30 minutes.
Stuffing

Anything you want. You can make them savory or sweet. My favorite versions are:
  • Cabbage sauteed with onions and smoked sausage.
  • Mashed potatoes, mushrooms, and onions.
  • Apples, ham, and cheddar.
Start breaking out pieces of dough and rolling them out into circles about 4" in diameter. Fill each circle with stuffing and pinch the edges close. Lay out on the baking sheet and brush with a mix of cream and egg.

Bake 30 minutes at 400 degrees F.
These are awesome car travel food. Easy to munch on, and you can make an assortment at the same time.
 
@granfire - and another one.

Cold Red Borshch

(For a large pot about 1 gallon in capacity)

- 2 large potatoes
- 3 decent-size carrots
- 1 small head of cabbage (not lettuce - not the same thing!)
- 1 large raw beet or (for speed purposes) 2 cans of small whole beets<
- 1/2 large onion (I use Vidalia)
- your favorite herbs and spices (I use rosemary, basil, one or two bay leaves, ground black pepper, regular salt and onion salt)
- sour cream

Making a borshch is a fairly labor-intensive and messy process. So, wear an apron and engage some friends and femily to help you peel and chop everything.

Fill the pot with water about 2/3 of the way and put on low-to-medium heat. Peel the potatoes, chop into 1/2" cubes and drop into the pot. Peel the carrots, chop into circles about 1/8" thick, drop into the pot. (Notice - we are adding vegetables gradually, because some of them take longer to cook. Potatos and carrots are the hardest of the lot, so we add them first.) Wash the cabbage and peel off and discard the wilted leaves. Slice it into large pieces first, then chop finely and add to the pot. (I usually can't resist eating a few cabbage leaves raw - they are good for you!) Chop up the onion and add to the mix.

Potatos, carrots, onions and cabbage make up the bulk of your borshch. This is a good time to start adding your herbs and spices and mixing everything up thoroughtly. Make sure to taste the liquid in the pan - potatos and carrots do absorb salt, so you may need to add a little more salt gradually to make sure your borshch doesn't taste flat. Increase the heat to medium, but don't let it boil - it has to cook slowly to ensure all the flavors seep into the mix and combine.

If you are using a raw beet, peel and shred it. Or, pop your two cans of whole beets and shred them. Add the shredded beets to the borshch. If you are using canned beets, feel free to add the beet juice to the mix as well - it will make the color that much prettier. Add a few pinches of onion salt. (Yes, we do already have some onions in there, but onion salt really enhances the flavor of the beets.)

By this time, your pan has been simmering for 45 minutes to an hour. Grab a fork, fish out a few pieces of potato and/or carrot and taste them to see whether they are cooked. Taste the liquid and add more herbs and spices if you are not completely satisfied with the flavor. If the potatos and carrots are cooked and the flavor is to your satisfaction, turn off the stove, cover the pot and let it sit for a couple of hours. Then put it in the fridge to cool. Serve cold with a dollop of sour cream and a sprig of parsley on top.

Sauteed beets

(Use as a side when you don't feel like making a salad. These quantities serve 2 people - just do the math if you need more.)

- 1 can of whole beets
- 1/4 stick of butter or 2-3 spoons of olive oil
- Onion salt and ground black pepper to taste
- Sharp cheese or sour cream to taste

Shred the beets. Heat up the butter or olive oil in a small pan (I use the small cast iron pan, but if you want to cheat and use non-stick, it's up to you) on low heat. Add the beets and 1/4 cup of the beet juice from the can. Sautee on low-to-medium heat, stirring constantly. As the juice start boiling out, add onion salt and black pepper and mix thoroughly. Put the heat back on low, cover the pan and cook for a couple more minutes.

If you are using sharp cheese, use this time to shred the cheese. If not, just sit on your hands.

Remove the cover from the pan and make sure most of the juice is gone. Add a little bit more onion salt and stir. Don't let the beets get scorched - it really ruins the taste!

Serve as a side with whatever else you are having for dinner. Either put the beets into one large dish and cover with shredded cheese or with sour cream on top or put on individual plates and garnish with cheese or with a dollop of sour cream. Enjoy!
Around our house, this presages Summer.
 
Pasties. Nice, hot, crispy pasties; Yooper style. Grandma makes a good creamed herring. I like pickled pike better than pickled herring. I make a mean chili. Just never wrote down a recipie. A favorite breakfeast is grits with gravy on toast. When I get home, I might pen a few recipies.
 
Last edited:
Tuna dip is a favorite in our family.

Tuna (2 cans)
Cream cheese (1 box)
Mayo ( 2 Tbsp)
Dill pickle juice ( 2 ounces)
Chopped Dill ( a whole lot :))
Salt (to taste)
Pepper (to taste)
Garlic salt or fresh garlic (to taste)

Serve with potato chips.

Trick is to whip air into the tuna/cream cheese mixture before adding the liquids.
 
Tuna dip is a favorite in our family.

Tuna (2 cans)
Cream cheese (1 box)
Mayo ( 2 Tbsp)
Dill pickle juice ( 2 ounces)
Chopped Dill ( a whole lot :))
Salt (to taste)
Pepper (to taste)
Garlic salt or fresh garlic (to taste)

Serve with potato chips.

Trick is to whip air into the tuna/cream cheese mixture before adding the liquids.
There is no such thing as too much dill, right? ;)
 
I always assumed a martial arts cookbook would be about poundcake and punch all day every day
 
I hope everyone is having a happy and safe 4th of July. Here, in Western North Carolina wilderness, we are engaged in a HIGHLY un-American activity - we are roasting a duck. Well... to be more exact... I am roasting a duck, whilst the rest of the household (human, canine, and feline) walks around sniffing the air and drooling.

Today's roasted duck incarnation is stuffed with brown rice, onions, and mushrooms. The stuffing is seasoned with salt and Flowers of Moffat Scottish herb mix. The duck is also being infused with home grown parsley, rosemary, oregano, and chives. The exterior of the bird has been treated with truffle oil, lemon pepper spice mix, and studded with nectarines and sweet onion slices.
 
Ok, heres an easy one....yes more dill!
Dont throw out that jar of kosher dill pickle juice when youve eaten the last pickle!
Save it & make some hard boiled eggs, peel them & add them to the pickle jar.

Wait a couple of days & voila! Green dill pickled eggs. Goes great with sliced ham! Nothing like green eggs & ham!:)
 
I promised this earlier. I've included notes on where I remember futzing around with the recipe, which I tend to do rather liberally.

Kahlua Cheescake

CRUST: (If you are familiar with graham cracker crust, just make one with a tad more fat and some cocoa and maybe sugar in it)
1 1/4 cup graham cracker crumbs
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup cocoa (use dutched - it's better)
1/3 cup butter
(I sometimes add a bit of cinnamon, ginger, and/or allspice)

CAKE:
16 oz cream cheese, softened (you can get away with neufchatel if you want to reduce the fat)
3/4 cup sugar (I sometimes skimp on this)
1/2 cup cocoa
2 large eggs
1/4 cup STRONG coffee (if you like your coffee strong, make this stronger)
1/4 cup Kahlua (I've never substituted other kinds, but any coffee liqueur should work)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract (I've never limited myself to this amount)

TOPPING: (I typically increase this by 25-50% - it's much better with more of this!)
1 cup sour cream (I think you could use Greek yogurt, but haven't gotten around to trying it)
2 tablespoons sugar (I tend to cut this back, too)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract (I sometimes substitute or combine with almond extract)
6-8 chocolate curls (entirely optional - I've only ever bothered to either grate chocolate on top, or sprinkle with flavored sugars - usually espresso flavor)

  1. Pre-heat oven to 325 F.
  2. Combine crust ingredients and mix well. Firmly press into bottom of a 9-inch springform pan.
  3. Bake crust for 5 minutes, then cool.
  4. Pre-heat oven to 375 F.
  5. Beat cream cheese with mixer until light and fluffy. Gradually add sugar, mixing well. Beat in cocoa, then add eggs, beating between. Blend completely, then stir in the remaining ingredients.
  6. Pour the batter into the pan with the crust. Bake at 375 for 25 minutes. Filling should be soft, but will firm up as cake stands. (NOTE: Mine often doesn't set up entirely, and remains a bit pudding-like, but that's probably because I fiddle too much with the ingredients. It's always really good, even if it doesn't set fully.)
  7. Preheat oven to 425 F.
  8. Combine the topping ingredients and pour over the top of the hot cheesecake, spreading evenly. Bake 5-7 minutes at 425.
  9. Let cool to room temperature on a wire rack, then chill a few hours. (NOTE: If you're impatient, it will be runny, but REALLY tasty. Go ahead, have a bowl of warm cheesecake!)
  10. Remove sides of springform pan. Garnish with something (chocolate curls, flavored sugar, whatever) or nothing.
This is a rich dessert - expect to eat smaller amounts than you would of regular cheesecake. If you don't like coffee or cheesecake, you probably won't like this. If you like both, you'll love this!
 
I promised this earlier. I've included notes on where I remember futzing around with the recipe, which I tend to do rather liberally.

Kahlua Cheescake

CRUST: (If you are familiar with graham cracker crust, just make one with a tad more fat and some cocoa and maybe sugar in it)
1 1/4 cup graham cracker crumbs
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup cocoa (use dutched - it's better)
1/3 cup butter
(I sometimes add a bit of cinnamon, ginger, and/or allspice)

CAKE:
16 oz cream cheese, softened (you can get away with neufchatel if you want to reduce the fat)
3/4 cup sugar (I sometimes skimp on this)
1/2 cup cocoa
2 large eggs
1/4 cup STRONG coffee (if you like your coffee strong, make this stronger)
1/4 cup Kahlua (I've never substituted other kinds, but any coffee liqueur should work)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract (I've never limited myself to this amount)

TOPPING: (I typically increase this by 25-50% - it's much better with more of this!)
1 cup sour cream (I think you could use Greek yogurt, but haven't gotten around to trying it)
2 tablespoons sugar (I tend to cut this back, too)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract (I sometimes substitute or combine with almond extract)
6-8 chocolate curls (entirely optional - I've only ever bothered to either grate chocolate on top, or sprinkle with flavored sugars - usually espresso flavor)

  1. Pre-heat oven to 325 F.
  2. Combine crust ingredients and mix well. Firmly press into bottom of a 9-inch springform pan.
  3. Bake crust for 5 minutes, then cool.
  4. Pre-heat oven to 375 F.
  5. Beat cream cheese with mixer until light and fluffy. Gradually add sugar, mixing well. Beat in cocoa, then add eggs, beating between. Blend completely, then stir in the remaining ingredients.
  6. Pour the batter into the pan with the crust. Bake at 375 for 25 minutes. Filling should be soft, but will firm up as cake stands. (NOTE: Mine often doesn't set up entirely, and remains a bit pudding-like, but that's probably because I fiddle too much with the ingredients. It's always really good, even if it doesn't set fully.)
  7. Preheat oven to 425 F.
  8. Combine the topping ingredients and pour over the top of the hot cheesecake, spreading evenly. Bake 5-7 minutes at 425.
  9. Let cool to room temperature on a wire rack, then chill a few hours. (NOTE: If you're impatient, it will be runny, but REALLY tasty. Go ahead, have a bowl of warm cheesecake!)
  10. Remove sides of springform pan. Garnish with something (chocolate curls, flavored sugar, whatever) or nothing.
This is a rich dessert - expect to eat smaller amounts than you would of regular cheesecake. If you don't like coffee or cheesecake, you probably won't like this. If you like both, you'll love this!
Ill most likely end up trying this one out. A few comments...

Why substitute the cream cheese to reduce the fat? THATS WHERE THE FLAVOR IS :)

Ive substituted Greek yogurt for sour cream in a ton of stuff. I initially read about doing that in Mens Healths Eat this, not that stuff and was pretty skeptical until I tried it. It just sounded like it would be disgusting, but Ive never detected any difference. Ive substituted it in stuff for people unbeknownst to them, and they never noticed either. Mainly burritos, nachos, stuff like that.
 
Ill most likely end up trying this one out. A few comments...

Why substitute the cream cheese to reduce the fat? THATS WHERE THE FLAVOR IS :)

Ive substituted Greek yogurt for sour cream in a ton of stuff. I initially read about doing that in Mens Healths Eat this, not that stuff and was pretty skeptical until I tried it. It just sounded like it would be disgusting, but Ive never detected any difference. Ive substituted it in stuff for people unbeknownst to them, and they never noticed either. Mainly burritos, nachos, stuff like that.
I've substituted neufchatel in a few things before, and rarely can tell the difference. I've not tried it yet in this recipe, but maybe I'll make an extra next time and compare them. I've also not tried the Greek yogurt substitution - I'm not sure if it will "melt" on the hot cheesecake the same way, nor if it will set similarly when cooked, but I suspect it'll do as well here as it has in every other instance I've used it as a substitute for sour cream.

If you try any variations, let me know how it turns out.
 
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