Leopard Kung Fu

clfsean

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Bucksam Kong's Leopard training is legit.

But see this? Even in great books by total masters, they sometimes skip little details.

See the error? And I only say this with the greatest respect for Master Kong, I just know that sometimes especially when posing for the camera, anyone can make mistakes.

View attachment 29026
I doubt it's an error ... more like a marker ;)
 

Kung Fu Wang

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Would you happen to know the other animal body and footwork methods?
When I cross trained the white ape system, I have learned:

1. cat jump - block opponent's punch. hop in and punch him.
2. tiger hop - hop in and punch your opponent.
3. monkey dodge - block oponent's punch, dodge under his arm, spin your body, and elbow strike on his chest.
4. eagle flip - block your opponent one arm up. block his other arm up. punch his chest.

1 and 2 are similar. Since it covers a great distance, it can surprise your opponent big time.

The long fist basic training form "Lian Bu Quan" came from Shaolin dragon form. It has the dragon spirit.

The parying mantis training form "little swallow and tiger" has both swallow and tiger spirit.
 
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CMyers0323

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Since Metal can relate to the leopard I have this on the Metal element
 

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CMyers0323

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Bucksam Kong's Leopard training is legit.

But see this? Even in great books by total masters, they sometimes skip little details.

See the error? And I only say this with the greatest respect for Master Kong, I just know that sometimes especially when posing for the camera, anyone can make mistakes.

View attachment 29026
Ah yes I see what you mean. It makes sense I'm glad I own a book from a master who is legit. Sometimes I can tell just based off how the books structured haha.
 
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CMyers0323

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These are definitely Leopard technique.

That's definitely NOT a "straight right" though in the top picture though in Master's Kong's book.. Ah well, sometimes people take creative license in these books.

Middle picture, yes, Leopard style is very agile with its footwork. All over the place, like a dancer with strong legs. Lots of jumping, and the ability to suddenly be falling but find your footing.

Bottom one, a technique I actually sort of pulled off in a friendly competition once. This is called a "Through the sleeve" technique, and there it is again, the infamous floating rib. It's similar to this one (F), though this older illustration from the 60's shows a more proper guarding of the head by the non-striking hand (something Master Kong is skipping in his photo, because he's actually using his free hand to grab the oppoents other lead wrist, pulling him into the strike).

View attachment 29028

Ow.

View attachment 29027
That's great to hear! I figured they would all be leopard and not just one or two since it's meant to go section by section for each animal style.
I've been told the same for leopard it's very agile I've seen some of the springing footwork they use so to speak. I see that's really cool. Thankfully I've tended to be able find my footing when falling often so I guess I've been practicing Leopard haha.

Thats really cool! Its been some time since I've been able to compete so I look forward to doing more soon. I don't think I've heard of the technique though I've seen some similar. I see that's really cool. I do agree with missing the details books in general can lack it even from a good book. I guess that's why it's best to learn in person if possible but studying on the side from books and videos is always great
 
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When I cross trained the white ape system, I have learned:

1. cat jump - block opponent's punch. hop in and punch him.
2. tiger hop - hop in and punch your opponent.
3. monkey dodge - block oponent's punch, dodge under his arm, spin your body, and elbow strike on his chest.
4. eagle flip - block your opponent one arm up. block his other arm up. punch his chest.

1 and 2 are similar. Since it covers a great distance, it can surprise your opponent big time.

The long fist basic training form "Lian Bu Quan" came from Shaolin dragon form. It has the dragon spirit.

The parying mantis training form "little swallow and tiger" has both swallow and tiger spirit.
Wow these are very cool thanks for sharing.
I'd have to think of a list off hand of the few I know. Although majority of my training is in the Xing Yi so all elemental related stuff. The one that comes to mind which is simple is just moving in striking then moving out in a fluid motion being called rolling tides.

Not so much foot work but as for monkey tactic I was taught to use the hands to snap or clap as a means of distraction then to immediately strike after they loose focus which goes with the playfulness of a monkey style
 

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Wow these are very cool thanks for sharing.
I'd have to think of a list off hand of the few I know. Although majority of my training is in the Xing Yi so all elemental related stuff. The one that comes to mind which is simple is just moving in striking then moving out in a fluid motion being called rolling tides.

Not so much foot work but as for monkey tactic I was taught to use the hands to snap or clap as a means of distraction then to immediately strike after they loose focus which goes with the playfulness of a monkey style
Also, since you are a Xing Yi guy, check out the book Nei Jia Quan by Jess o Brien.
 

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View attachment 29033

Great article man. Ty Wong and My Sigung James Wing Woo lived together for a while and were both Hop Sing Tong members. Ty Wong and Lau Bun were the two main teachers for the Tong then. @clfsean also trained with a disciple from this group as well. One of my students recently digitized tape recorded interviews and discussions with James Wing Woo that have some stories of all these guys in that article. He knew everyone. I have lot of great stories of him and my Sifu Paul Gale as well.
 

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It depends on where you look.

I mean when martial artists are talking and teaching about techniques. They usually just go through the concept of what it's supposed to do, but never show a real application of it, not even in the lightest sparring. sessions. For example.

Step 1. Take a video light sparring (complete)

Step 2. Review the video and highlight where kung fu techniques were used. (complete)
Step 3. For each highlighted technique. Cut to a video showing the concept of what was done. (Missing that part) but it will look like this but with talking

For me personally some of that sparring in the first video was getting close to the intermediate intensity level. When things get to that level you really gotta start landing the shots with power so that it interrupts an attack. But anyway, I think if it's done this as described above, it will take a lot of the fantasy perceptions that CMA often gets and it will correct some of those misunderstood concepts. For example, when you see double palm strike in the video. The first thing we all should probably think is that the technique may not be intended for how it was use as it puts the person at risk of catching hook over the pushing arms. This is especially true, if your arms are shorter than the person punching you. I personally don't have any shame about getting a technique that I don't quite understand wrong. There's no shame in saying "I'm still learning the correct application or I'm exploring the technique." I think it would go a long way especially with people like @Alan0354 who don't have a positive perception of CMA. Videos like that would create be valuable in fixing some of the assumptions that we as practioners and some as teachers have. It's bound to happen when no one is sparring with the techniques.

For example, I'm familiar with some of the techniques in the video below. I can tell you without doubt that the technique at 0:52 -1:02 isn't going to work like he's showing. The techniques are valid, just not in the combo that is shown. Technique: at 1:51 - 2:04 where the strike comes from the top is also wrong application. That strike is supposed to land on the top of the head. In the form it lands on top with palm down. In application it's the exact same thing. But you don't want to do that punch in sparring because it compresses the spine and can cause serious injury.


By the way I asked the MMA guy if he would like to do a similar video and he agreed to it. I'm going to see if I can do the same thing, but actually go over some of the kung fu that I do.
 
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CMyers0323

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I mean when martial artists are talking and teaching about techniques. They usually just go through the concept of what it's supposed to do, but never show a real application of it, not even in the lightest sparring. sessions. For example.

Step 1. Take a video light sparring (complete)

Step 2. Review the video and highlight where kung fu techniques were used. (complete)
Step 3. For each highlighted technique. Cut to a video showing the concept of what was done. (Missing that part) but it will look like this but with talking

For me personally some of that sparring in the first video was getting close to the intermediate intensity level. When things get to that level you really gotta start landing the shots with power so that it interrupts an attack. But anyway, I think if it's done this as described above, it will take a lot of the fantasy perceptions that CMA often gets and it will correct some of those misunderstood concepts. For example, when you see double palm strike in the video. The first thing we all should probably think is that the technique may not be intended for how it was use as it puts the person at risk of catching hook over the pushing arms. This is especially true, if your arms are shorter than the person punching you. I personally don't have any shame about getting a technique that I don't quite understand wrong. There's no shame in saying "I'm still learning the correct application or I'm exploring the technique." I think it would go a long way especially with people like @Alan0354 who don't have a positive perception of CMA. Videos like that would create be valuable in fixing some of the assumptions that we as practioners and some as teachers have. It's bound to happen when no one is sparring with the techniques.

For example, I'm familiar with some of the techniques in the video below. I can tell you without doubt that the technique at 0:52 -1:02 isn't going to work like he's showing. The techniques are valid, just not in the combo that is shown. Technique: at 1:51 - 2:04 where the strike comes from the top is also wrong application. That strike is supposed to land on the top of the head. In the form it lands on top with palm down. In application it's the exact same thing. But you don't want to do that punch in sparring because it compresses the spine and can cause serious injury.


By the way I asked the MMA guy if he would like to do a similar video and he agreed to it. I'm going to see if I can do the same thing, but actually go over some of the kung fu that I do.
Yeah I gotta agree I'm sure some times there's a reason but at the same time it ends up leaving others to assume and probably get it wrong if not shown with applications.

I do agree there. I've been told by one instructor that doing a gradual increase in intensity is a good idea. You slowly build up your reaction and can properly apply the techniques. Since if you went full force from the beginning your most likely not be able to apply it. That was their concept.

I do agree there I think for some cases people dismiss the CMA simply because they don't understand it and as you mentioned it was taught or demonstrated poorly. I've also seen in some senses a said technique that would be applied under X circumstances and then you have people saying it doesn't work. Simply for the fact it wasn't taught it was meant for X time. I'm all for the hard training to make sure it stays legit though. Although that's a whole topic by itself haha. I see what your saying there. It's good to be skeptical but most (not sure of this member) are far to skeptical and don't even give it a shot.


That would be great! Hopefully we'll be able to see the video sometime soon then!
 
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