Hanbo - dimensions and wood type

mrhnau

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We recently had an oak tree fall down. Beautiful tree. I'm contemplating having some hanbo's made out of the trunk. Is Oak a reasonably durable wood for practice purposes? Also, what exactly should the diameter be? I don't have one handy to measure. Is there any method for treating the wood to make it harder? How long should I let it dry out before crafting?
 

Kreth

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mrhnau said:
We recently had an oak tree fall down. Beautiful tree. I'm contemplating having some hanbo's made out of the trunk. Is Oak a reasonably durable wood for practice purposes? Also, what exactly should the diameter be? I don't have one handy to measure. Is there any method for treating the wood to make it harder? How long should I let it dry out before crafting?
I believe most of my hanbo are an inch in diameter. Most hardwoods are suitable for training weapons once properly oiled. I like hickory, Japanese white oak, and black walnut myself. A good way to treat the wood is to let it soak in linseed oil for several days before you do the final sanding and finishing. Just make sure you use boiled linseed oil and not the raw kind, and the raw linseed oil never really "sets" and will continue to seep from the wood's pores. I can't help you on the drying time, as I usually purchase dowels when I make hanbo.
 

elder999

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Kreth said:
I believe most of my hanbo are an inch in diameter. Most hardwoods are suitable for training weapons once properly oiled. I like hickory, Japanese white oak, and black walnut myself. A good way to treat the wood is to let it soak in linseed oil for several days before you do the final sanding and finishing. Just make sure you use boiled linseed oil and not the raw kind, and the raw linseed oil never really "sets" and will continue to seep from the wood's pores.

I like to use tung oil, or 50-50 tung/boiled linseed, depending upon the wood.Some people mix in beeswax.

Oak is good, depending on where you are, and tung oil is good too.

Many oaks freely hybridize int the wild, because of this, he wood may not be similar to others that appear to be from the same species.Second, there are many oaks - common names can often be confusing, especially in different parts of the country or world.I've often heard blackjack oak referred to as black oak-and there are several varieties of "scrub oak," that I doubt would make anything, as the wood tends to bend and misshape while drying.


Kreth said:
I can't help you on the drying time.....

Sand and shape, then sun dry for a week-turning each day. This is chiefly for color, and a personal thing. Afterward or otherwise, store in a cool, dry, shaded place, after applying a coat of oil-drying time will depend upon species of wood, but for "oak" should be at least a month and a half, or 45-60 days. This will bring it to about 30% moisture content-not too brittle, not green. Sand and oil again. That's how I do it, anyway.

Kreth said:
.... as I usually purchase dowels when I make hanbo.

SHHH!:lol:
 
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