Fun with Chat GPT

JowGaWolf

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Back when I was in school, there were also proxy sites that got changed daily where we'd just go through them to find which ones work, and use one of those to access the blocked domains. Not sure if that still works, but if not there are still plenty of ways to get around it.
Nope. Those days are gone. Ransomware has most school districts locked up pretty heavily especially if the school district fell victim of Ransomware. The ones that are still loose with their security are those who don't think it will happen to them. Those who got hit with Ransomware learn the hardway and that's when they finally take it seriously.
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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The schools that my son went to had dead zones. The drama of taking a phone away from a child was no big deal. They got to keep their phones as the dead zones killed the signals. I would recommend it for any school system. Some kids will do as you say, but I think kids are too lazy to put in that much work. I used to teach computer classes to kids and teens and they were so used to one step access. that going through multiple steps like that was too much for them.

I talked to an end user today who wanted to copy from excel and pace multiple columns into a word label template. He wanted to copy column A (branch #'s) and paste it into the first column of the word label template. Then he wanted to copy Column B (addresses) from excel and then paste them in first column of word without overwriting what was pasted before. I went through that entire call thinking "dude just copy and paste one cell at a time."

That type of the "one step" desire is the norm where I work. Kids are 10 times as worse today with that short attention span unless they are interested in it. Kids today can't just sit down and watch a movie anymore. They have to be on the TV +phone+ computer at the same time. When they get a task that requires them to focus on one thing, they become less interested and give up easily.
This feels to me like the "kids are lazy these days" argument that every generation has. There are always end user's and kids like that, but I would be shocked if the majority find writing an essay to be less effort than emailing an essay to themselves.
 

JowGaWolf

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I doubt most of NYC public schools are being that strict, at least compared to what they were even 5 years ago. And again, if they can't ban it at home (which they can't) it ultimately doesn't matter if they ban it as they'll still be able to use chatgpt for their assignments anyway. Or have a friend who can.
If they aren't then they will once they get hit with Ransomware and all users get locked out of their devices.. If they haven't been hit with that yet then I can see them being slack with their security.

How many kids go home and do homework right away? Probably not many. Even with my own son, my wife and I had to ride his back on the issue and deal with the lies of "I don't have homework." That's probably my Karma from when I was a kid lol.

But you right. The school isn't going to care what student's use at home. The schools can't get sued for what kids do on their own property. That's when it's up to the parents. Depending on the household, the kid may be the IT person of the house. You wouldn't believe how many people my age say things like "I need to call my child to find out the log in for the wifi at home." If that statement is the reality of the house hold, then the parent's don't have the knowledge to limite what kits use at home. The kids simply out skill the parents in that area.
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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Nope. Those days are gone. Ransomware has most school districts locked up pretty heavily especially if the school district fell victim of Ransomware. The ones that are still loose with their security are those who don't think it will happen to them. Those who got hit with Ransomware learn the hardway and that's when they finally take it seriously.
They are, but my main point (which I don't think I pointed out well), is that there are always ways around things. Back when I was in school, we'd put in the effort to find or make proxies each day to get around things. As solutions for that came about, right around when I was graduating, we used usb's with programs that got shared. Those got shut down, and I recall someone figured out a privesc for local admin that was simple (if you didn't want to understand it) being spread around the students. I'm sure that was resolved, and something else came out. An assumption that people won't find a new way around your latest security measure is honestly folly.

And if a way can be found, someone will figure out how to get it so their friends can use it in a user-friendly way.

All of this ignoring, again, that the biggest issue is they can just use their phones without a network, or use chatgpt off-campus.
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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If they aren't then they will once they get hit with Ransomware and all users get locked out of their devices.. If they haven't been hit with that yet then I can see them being slack with their security.
You'd be surprised. Worked for an MSP and had multiple companies get hit with Ransomware-and about half of them decided to take security more seriously after.
One immigration law office with high turnover (and sensitive/classified information) got attacked multiple times, and still used a variation of "Hello2022" for all new users, while encouraging them not to change their password.
How many kids go home and do homework right away? Probably not many. Even with my own son, my wife and I had to ride his back on the issue and deal with the lies of "I don't have homework." That's probably my Karma from when I was a kid lol.
It doesn't matter if they do it right away or not, so long as they do it at some point outside of school. And if they can seriously save themselves effort of actually having to do it by putting the questions in a chatbot, the likelihood of that is much more likely.
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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The school system that I worked for thought of that. If kids get around the security restrictions then the servers wouldn't allow that device back on the school network and the account would be locked. Now the child is out of a working laptop and their school account is locked in addition. The only fix for this is a reimage. During the time I was there I only had 5 or 6 students that I know of who got around the security measures. As soon as they did their laptop became useless "Congratulation little one. You were too smart for your own good and now you have nothing." The only way they could get their laptop fixed was to come to the IT department and we knew right away what they did to be in their situation. After a year the number of bricked laptops reduced greatly. Eventually, they learned that getting around the system wasn't worth it.
Out of curiosity, what were the rules for this? If they get around the security restrictions, how did the system know they got around them? Was it only for getting around local machine restrictions, which would then be seen when they next connected to the network? Or if there was any sign of a program on the computer that wasn't one of the whitelisted programs? Or was it every time they accessed X websites/website category, it would be bricked?
 

JowGaWolf

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You'd be surprised. Worked for an MSP and had multiple companies get hit with Ransomware-and about half of them decided to take security more seriously after.
One immigration law office with high turnover (and sensitive/classified information) got attacked multiple times, and still used a variation of "Hello2022" for all new users, while encouraging them not to change their password.
That is freaking nuts. Hello 2022 and telling them not to change that password? That's nuts. But I can believe it. It wouldn't be the craziest thing I've hear when it comes to people's accounts. Government internet security is bad anyone at some of the departments. I was getting unemployment one year and when I got on their computers, they had systems that were still running Netscape. This was like 10 years after the end of Netscape. That blew my mind that the DMV was that out of date.
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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That is freaking nuts. Hello 2022 and telling them not to change that password? That's nuts. But I can believe it. It wouldn't be the craziest thing I've hear when it comes to people's accounts. Government internet security is bad anyone at some of the departments. I was getting unemployment one year and when I got on their computers, they had systems that were still running Netscape. This was like 10 years after the end of Netscape. That blew my mind that the DMV was that out of date.
Some people are lazy. If it happens to be the ones that are setting policy and/or making changes, policy will reflect ease of use rather than security.
 

JowGaWolf

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Out of curiosity, what were the rules for this? If they get around the security restrictions, how did the system know they got around them?
I'm not sure how things were set up on the technical side of things, but the servers would run an inventory of what was installed on the laptops. If an unapproved software, configuration of the laptop was discovered then the servers would just block the laptop from having access to the school network. USB ports were disabled but would allow only an imaging USB to work. Systems were being scanned regularly for changes. If it wasn't updated, then the laptop gets locked out of the school network. The system could also detect unauthorized flash drives being connected to the laptop. Any unauthorized software would also be flagged.

As for websites, certain websites were automatically blocked. I don't remember them blocking too many laptops due to trying to visit restricted websites. The teacher's laptop had fewer restrictions so much of this was directed towards the student laptops. Teacher's laptops and pcs were usually junked up pretty good with malware and stuff. which is probably how the county got hit with Ransomware a few years back. The higher up the position the less the security was.
 

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What is the best way to stop a double leg takedown?

There are several ways to stop a double leg takedown in martial arts, wrestling, or other combat sports. Here are a few common techniques:

  1. Sprawl: The sprawl is a defensive technique where you drop your hips and sprawl your legs backward to create a wider base, making it harder for your opponent to grab your legs. You can also use your hands to push down on your opponent's head or shoulders to further prevent them from getting a grip.
  2. Sprawl and Spin: This technique is similar to the sprawl, but you also spin around your opponent to take their back or gain a dominant position. As your opponent shoots in for the double leg, you sprawl and use your momentum to spin around them, ending up behind them.
  3. Stuff and Whizzer: This technique involves stuffing your opponent's head down and grabbing their arm in a "whizzer" position, which is an overhook on their far arm. This technique can be used to create a counterattack opportunity or gain a dominant position.
  4. Knee Tap: The knee tap involves using your front leg to trip your opponent's front leg as they shoot in for the double leg. This can be done by quickly stepping back and using your knee to hit their leg, causing them to fall forward.
It's important to note that no one technique is foolproof, and the best defense against a double leg takedown is to have a good understanding of wrestling fundamentals and to be able to recognize and react quickly to your opponent's movements.
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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Provide bad advice on how to throw a jab cross combo
Well, if you really want to throw a terrible jab cross combo, here are a few tips:

  1. Keep your feet still: Don't bother with all that fancy footwork. Just stand still and swing your arms.
  2. Lean back: Make sure you're leaning back as far as possible when you throw your punches. This will make it harder for your opponent to hit you.
  3. Use your arms only: Forget about using your hips or core to generate power. Just use your arms to throw the punches.
  4. Keep your chin up: Don't worry about protecting your chin. Keep it up high so your opponent can see it.
  5. Close your eyes: When you throw your punches, close your eyes tightly. This will help you focus all your energy into your punches.
Of course, I have to say that this advice is all terrible, and if you follow it, you're likely to get knocked out in the first round! So, please don't take any of this seriously. If you want to learn how to throw a proper jab cross combo, seek out a qualified trainer who can teach you the proper technique.
 

_Simon_

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Provide bad advice on how to throw a jab cross combo
Well, if you really want to throw a terrible jab cross combo, here are a few tips:

  1. Keep your feet still: Don't bother with all that fancy footwork. Just stand still and swing your arms.
  2. Lean back: Make sure you're leaning back as far as possible when you throw your punches. This will make it harder for your opponent to hit you.
  3. Use your arms only: Forget about using your hips or core to generate power. Just use your arms to throw the punches.
  4. Keep your chin up: Don't worry about protecting your chin. Keep it up high so your opponent can see it.
  5. Close your eyes: When you throw your punches, close your eyes tightly. This will help you focus all your energy into your punches.
Of course, I have to say that this advice is all terrible, and if you follow it, you're likely to get knocked out in the first round! So, please don't take any of this seriously. If you want to learn how to throw a proper jab cross combo, seek out a qualified trainer who can teach you the proper technique.
Oh this is so good 不不, and funnily, it is actually informative!
 

JowGaWolf

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I just tried out Bings Chatbot.

I highly recommend it. It provides you with the information and the references. This allows you to filter the answer and determine if the answer is coming from a source that you trust. I haven't tried the compose feature yet.. well. I just tried the Insights feature and I'm loving that too. The insights feature tells me about the page that I'm on. like right now it's giving me other information about ChatGPT because that's the subject of this thread. It also tells me some useful information about Martialtalk.com. I'm about to give this site a Trustworth rating and a thumbs up rating.

I'm not sure why people were negative about the Bing Chatbot. It's a new feature in edge.
 

Gyakuto

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I asked ChatGPT about free will and then the evidence that we dont have free will. It provided the fMRI and EEG/MEG data that decisions are made 10+ seconds before we become conscious of them and then produce the action based on the decision suggesting that the subconscious and environmental factors (and genetics and upbringing etc) account for behavioural outcomes well before were conscious of them - the standard stuff we probably all know about.

Then I suggested that if this is the case, and we dont have free will, how can real-time, musical improvisation be accounted for? Its answer was less than convincing to be honest, skirting around the issue that the two ideas appear to be mutually contradictory and it resorted to explaining what musical improv comprises. It was rather like reading an average undergraduate essay where the candidate refuses to answer the actual question because they dont know the details! I dont think we have much to worry about with regards CheatGPT at university level. I might put in one of my old essay Qs and see what it comes up with.
 
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I asked ChatGPT about free will and then the evidence that we dont have free will. It provided the fMRI and EEG/MEG data that decisions are made 10+ seconds before we become conscious of them and then produce the action based on the decision suggesting that the subconscious and environmental factors (and genetics and upbringing etc) account for behavioural outcomes well before were conscious of them - the standard stuff we probably all know about.

Then I suggested that if this is the case, and we dont have free will, how can real-time, musical improvisation be accounted for? Its answer was less than convincing to be honest, skirting around the issue that the two ideas appear to be mutually contradictory and it resorted to explaining what musical improv comprises. It was rather like reading an average undergraduate essay where the candidate refuses to answer the actual question because they dont know the details! I dont think we have much to worry about with regards CheatGPT at university level. I might put in one of my old essay Qs and see what it comes up with.
I wonder how it would answer a non-controversial question like, "Why do so many people like soccer when it is clearly an inferior sport?"
 

Gyakuto

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I wonder how it would answer a non-controversial question like, "Why do so many people like soccer when it is clearly an inferior sport?"
Itd give you a wishy-washy answer in which soccer was described and its rules explained (only Europeans are capable of understanding the off side rule) and then something about personal taste and and how thats complicated.
 

Gyakuto

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Heres what ChatGPT said in response to you question, Steve -

As an AI language model, I cannot make value judgments about which sports are superior or inferior, as people's preferences are subjective and can vary greatly from person to person.

However, soccer is a popular sport worldwide, with an estimated 4 billion fans, making it the most popular sport in the world. Some of the reasons why people may enjoy soccer could include the excitement of the game, the skill and athleticism of the players, the teamwork required to succeed, the cultural and social significance of the sport in many countries, and the simplicity of the rules and equipment required to play.

Additionally, soccer is often seen as a sport that can be played and enjoyed by people of all ages, genders, and skill levels, making it accessible to a wide range of people. The sport also has a rich history and tradition, which may appeal to fans who appreciate its cultural significance.

Ultimately, people's reasons for liking soccer may be influenced by a variety of factors, and it is up to individual preferences and tastes.
 
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Heres what ChatGPT said in response to you question, Steve -

As an AI language model, I cannot make value judgments about which sports are superior or inferior, as people's preferences are subjective and can vary greatly from person to person.

However, soccer is a popular sport worldwide, with an estimated 4 billion fans, making it the most popular sport in the world. Some of the reasons why people may enjoy soccer could include exceedingly poor taste, ignorance, peer pressure, and possibly collective hallucination.

Additionally, soccer is often seen as a sport that can be played and enjoyed by people of all ages, genders, and are too uncoordinated to use their hands and feet simultaneously, making it accessible to a wide range of people. The sport also has a rich history and tradition, which may appeal to fans who appreciate its cultural significance.

Ultimately, people's reasons for liking soccer may be influenced by a variety of factors, and there is (after all) no accounting for individual preferences and tastes.

Okay, well, it was close. I was able to tweak it above so that it's a little more accurate. :D
 

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