Feels awkward evading punches when practicing trapping drills

JKDJade

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I'm enrolled in a JKD school that heavily teaches Professor Gary Dill's (1st Gen student) Jeet Kune Do combatives system. In this school, when executing trapping and punching drills with a partner, it's primarily encouraged that we move about 45 degrees off of the center for an oncoming punch and execute our trapping and punching technique (Our partners are encouraged to throw a punch to the nose directly as if they aim to punch the other partner in the face). The problem I have is parrying and moving off the center to avoid the hit. For me, it feels awkward, as if I'm not exactly as fluid as I feel I should be.
Any tips from a more experienced JKD student/practitioner? I've currently been enrolled in this school for almost a year now.

The theory is spot on. You just need to take your time, gain flow, then muscle memory....in JKD some of the most simplest moves take years to get down. That's why many JKD studios only take experienced students. Hope you are still sticking with it.
 

JowGaWolf

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In general, I find it you move off line while parrying, it's not a real parry. It's really just evading, and the parry is just a sort of insurance
The parry is back up for when timing is off. In this case it's a technique that acknowledges the reality that no one is perfect. Miscalculations happen. Most good techniques take this into account
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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The parry is back up for when timing is off. In this case it's a technique that acknowledges the reality that no one is perfect. Miscalculations happen. Most good techniques take this into account
I met up with/did a brief session with a silat instructor a few years back. We went back and forth, but he demonstrated a throw on me, and asked me to pay attention to what was actually causing the throw. He did the throw, and it turns out that multiple things were causing it.

He explained to me that in silat, you always want to have at least 2 things, preferably 3, causing an actual throw-where any one of them would succeed on it's own without the other two. The point is that if either you mess up the other two, or you're in a situation where you can't do them, you'll still succeed. That stuck with me.
 

wab25

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For me, it feels awkward, as if I'm not exactly as fluid as I feel I should be.
There are a number of drills that we do, where I felt all awkward and unfluid. I still feel that way during many of them. This used to bother me some. (actually, it still bothers me some... but I am using the phrase "used to" in order to seem like I got passed it.) Then, one day, while sparring my partner pointed out that what I had gotten him with, was that silly drill I was complaining about. This has happened a number of different times.

During the drill, we are focused on the steps of the drill. Where the feet are, what angle are we moving at, what are the hands doing. We do so much self evaluation, because we are focused on the drill. (sometimes this focus gets in the way) When you get into sparring or more live scenarios... you are not focused on the drill. You are focused on not getting hit or getting your shot in. If you have drilled properly, the movements from those drills, will happen without you having to think "Okay, now do drill #7." In fact, if you try to do a specific drill, you hardly ever get it, you end up forcing it. But, over time, you will start to notice the stuff you drill, will show up in your sparring. Its a very neat experience. Try not to act too surprised when it happens.

The other part... after seeing a drill movement show up, spontaneously while sparring, even a number of times, never makes the drill less awkward, at least not for me.
 

drop bear

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I met up with/did a brief session with a silat instructor a few years back. We went back and forth, but he demonstrated a throw on me, and asked me to pay attention to what was actually causing the throw. He did the throw, and it turns out that multiple things were causing it.

He explained to me that in silat, you always want to have at least 2 things, preferably 3, causing an actual throw-where any one of them would succeed on it's own without the other two. The point is that if either you mess up the other two, or you're in a situation where you can't do them, you'll still succeed. That stuck with me.

Do you have a video or something. I am struggling to picture that.
 

drop bear

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anyway. Concept wise to push a guy or punch effectively you basically have to be facing them. Sort of.(a body rip will be different) So generally when you create a flank you then turn towards them. So you are looking at them from side on.

In reality you almost never have time to do this. But the good thing is you don't have to wind up 90 or 45 degrees. A tiny angle is a big advantage.

So mabye the flow issue is you are just trying to get too far around when you don't necessarily have to.
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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Do you have a video or something. I am struggling to picture that.
Nope, this was a few years ago. And I don't really know silat so wouldn't know what to look for. But imagine a throw(or whatever terminology you use) where you're doing a sweep with your foot, and that sweep would work. Now imagine a throw where you're using your arm/upper body to muck up their balance and follow through with a throw that way. Which would also work on it's own.

Now imagine doing both at the same time (assuming they both throw in the same direction), and as long as one of them works, it doesn't matter if the other gets caught. From the conversation it's good if you mess up, but also good if the person tries to stop one, and fails to realize the other. A different way to deal with a counter than normal.
 

Gerry Seymour

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anyway. Concept wise to push a guy or punch effectively you basically have to be facing them. Sort of.(a body rip will be different) So generally when you create a flank you then turn towards them. So you are looking at them from side on.

In reality you almost never have time to do this. But the good thing is you don't have to wind up 90 or 45 degrees. A tiny angle is a big advantage.

So mabye the flow issue is you are just trying to get too far around when you don't necessarily have to.
A lot of the low-speed drills I've seen for this kind of movement tend to exaggerate the amount of movement, so that may indeed be the case.
 
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