Concrete Nouns, Abstract Nouns, and Verbs

Tez3

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Yiddish? Yeah, a lot of that in American English ....Especially around NYC. My mom was from there. And once I found out what some of those words actually meant ....I started using them a lot more! :p

😀
Being Sephardi, my language is Ladino (which I don't know nearly as much as I'd like to) rather than Yiddish but it's still descriptive lol.
 

Sandalphon

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I have been studying English since I was 5 years old, and to be honest, I always wondered about a lot of things, including the fact that English also has double negative, just like Kung Fu Wang said. That is one point that I will never understand, as all the other languages that I have been learning throughout my entire life do not have this kind of things. Despite the fact that I started to learn english so early, I still have some problems with my grammar, sometimes, I am not using the tenses in the right way, that freaks me out soooo much. I still have to use an online english writing tutor, so I do not forget some of the grammar rules and not only.
I am having a similar story actually.
 

Steve

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Two negatives = a positive.
Correct phrasing should be, "I don't know anybody."

English is very inconsistent due to its being a "mongrel" language with many contributors. This is, by itself, simply a challenge. But this is compounded by lax instruction in school and the lowering of expectations from the students. Uneducated use of the language has become the norm to the point that "wrong" usage = "right" usage. This is just another example of the "dumbing down" of our society.

Lowering the educational bar in school, police and military physical requirements, and many other areas for the sake of being "inclusive" of one group or another is beyond ridiculous from a socially and nationally logical perspective. What makes this so insidious is that it's facilitated by politicians who cave into special interests for the sake of their own interests, ahead of what's good for the country and society in the long term.

While this post may not socially engineer the future onto the right path, I feel much better. :)


Profound questions such as these, and dealing with other similarly important metaphysical considerations was why Zen was invented.
Well, you snuck that little bit of racism in there. Didn't you? The educational bar is lower for the sake of being inclusive?
 

isshinryuronin

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Well, you snuck that little bit of racism in there. Didn't you? The educational bar is lower for the sake of being inclusive?
"Racism" can be a term used to attack a political or social position that disagrees with one's own (an easy cheap shot since most everybody is against racism, including me), and is often bandied about out of ignorance or misunderstanding. My remark has nothing to do with racism

I do not believe any group is inherently less able to achieve educational competence or excellence.

Any statistical appearance of such a thing is due to the breakdown of societal factors and the government's failure to properly address them. So, rather than address the problems in our society and educational system (that does affect some segments of our society more than others,) the government simply redefines "success." I believe this approach is counter-productive to all.

Unfortunately, by refusing to address core problems, many in our society are left behind. This divide gives some factions a political power base for policies that further their own ends and encourages the perpetuation of these policies (that hurt those who most need help.) Redefining success, and instituting other policies, give the cover of political correctness and the perception of them caring, without them actually having to solve the problem.

It's ultimately about politics and power, not race or ethnicity. The reality is politics employs distraction, smoke and mirrors, intimidation via public opinion and the bending of perception to achieve its often self-serving goals.

I base my statements on my perception and analysis of the facts. Whether you agree or disagree with my opinions is your business. When you hint I'm a racist, it becomes my business. This is the only reason I'm writing such a post.
 

Steve

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"Racism" can be a term used to attack a political or social position that disagrees with one's own (an easy cheap shot since most everybody is against racism, including me), and is often bandied about out of ignorance or misunderstanding. My remark has nothing to do with racism

I do not believe any group is inherently less able to achieve educational competence or excellence.

Any statistical appearance of such a thing is due to the breakdown of societal factors and the government's failure to properly address them. So, rather than address the problems in our society and educational system (that does affect some segments of our society more than others,) the government simply redefines "success." I believe this approach is counter-productive to all.

Unfortunately, by refusing to address core problems, many in our society are left behind. This divide gives some factions a political power base for policies that further their own ends and encourages the perpetuation of these policies (that hurt those who most need help.) Redefining success, and instituting other policies, give the cover of political correctness and the perception of them caring, without them actually having to solve the problem.

It's ultimately about politics and power, not race or ethnicity. The reality is politics employs distraction, smoke and mirrors, intimidation via public opinion and the bending of perception to achieve its often self-serving goals.

I base my statements on my perception and analysis of the facts. Whether you agree or disagree with my opinions is your business. When you hint I'm a racist, it becomes my business. This is the only reason I'm writing such a post.
I don't know if you're a racist or not, but I did observe the casual racism you dropped in your post. For what it's worth, I do disagree with your position, which is why I pushed that little "disagree" button. :)
 

gpseymour

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Even today, I still don't know the difference between

- I agree with you.
- I don't disagree with you.
- I may agree with you today. But I preserve my right to disagree with you in the future if I can find a good reason for it.

The more that you have met with people, the more that you will like your dog. Why can't we just say what we think?

In school I always argued with my English teacher. My English teacher told me that I should make my sentence as more detail as possible. I have always believed that I should make my sentence as simple as possible.

In the following sentence, which one do you think is correct?

1. Do you put your right side forward, or do you put your left side forward?
2. Do you put your right side forward, or your left side forward?
3. Do you put your right side forward, or left side forward?
All or correct, but I'd prefer #4:

4. Do you put your right side or left side forward?
5. Do you put your right or left side forward?
 

Steve

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All or correct, but I'd prefer #4:

4. Do you put your right side or left side forward?
5. Do you put your right or left side forward?

I think @Kung Fu Wang is tricking us into doing the hokey pokey. :)

Regarding "I agree with you" and "I don't disagree with you" and similar examples, they mean the same thing; one is simply less direct. I have found that direct vs indirect language is often a reflection of how someone speaks the language, but like passive/active voice, it can be used intentionally to temper the message. Think of it as an additional spot on the spectrum.

For example, "I wholeheartedly agree!" -> "I agree!" -> "I agree." -> "I don't disagree." These all mean the same thing, but they clearly get progressively less enthusiastic.
 

Steve

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To elaborate more on direct and indirect language, the way you phrase things can muddy the waters and lead to misunderstanding.

For example, if you were to say, "Unlike many sport arts, we will teach you skills and techniques that can be used by you in real world situations." This suggests two things: that this school teaches techniques that can be used in the real world, and that sport arts do not.

On a different note, I think generally it's best to write for your audience, if understanding is the goal. When writing for most philosophy professors, the argument mattered much more than the style. If your argument was cogent and well considered, you would be forgiven the occasional run on sentence or inelegant language. An English professor, however, cared as much about style as about substance. So, they would be more inclined to forgive a specious argument than clumsy language.

In real life, if you're writing for general public audience, it's best to use active voice, simple and direct language, shorter sentences, and a conversational tone.

Oh, and I'm on team Oxford comma. :)
 

Steve

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The Oxford comma nearly always seems clearer to me than its absence.
oxford comma.jpg
 
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