Can knife fights be won by overpowering your opponent? By gradually moving knife closer until it pierces?Can disarms be done with brute strength too?

isshinryuronin

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There is some valuable methodology to having two free hands vs. the person holding the knife only having one.
I don't think I agree with this, if I'm understanding properly. I'd rather have a knife or stick in one hand than nothing in two. I'm guessing you're getting at using your extra free hand available for parrying or grabbing. But you can parry with the knife as well as your hand and inflict damage at the same time. No need to grab with your knife hand when you can cut/stab the guy instead.
 

dvcochran

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I don't think I agree with this, if I'm understanding properly. I'd rather have a knife or stick in one hand than nothing in two. I'm guessing you're getting at using your extra free hand available for parrying or grabbing. But you can parry with the knife as well as your hand and inflict damage at the same time. No need to grab with your knife hand when you can cut/stab the guy instead.
If you have tussled with or apprehended people very many times, particularly from a standing position, the need for free hands for balance and control cannot be understated. This is from a form Kali guy.
I get what you are saying about being able to do damage with the knife but if you need leverage or end up dropping the knife it has no advantage and can end up becoming a liability.
Again, the exception would be against a guy with good knife fighting experience. But they are not exactly a high quotient.
 

ytjer6t654uy6hy

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I don't think I agree with this, if I'm understanding properly. I'd rather have a knife or stick in one hand than nothing in two. I'm guessing you're getting at using your extra free hand available for parrying or grabbing. But you can parry with the knife as well as your hand and inflict damage at the same time. No need to grab with your knife hand when you can cut/stab the guy instead.
 

Buka

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I truly believe most of the crap SD from the past has been debunked with education. SA has integrated so much into most good SD programs that it is hard to separate them most of the time.
I agree, bruh. When I think back to some of the total crap I taught, as it was taught to me, I used to hang my head in shame. Thank God nobody got killed trying to defend themselves with what we used to teach them. ESPECIALLY as it relates to knife arts. Oh, dear God.
 

Wing Woo Gar

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I look at it as three possible outcomes.

You get cut/stabbed and he doesnt.

He gets cut/stabbed and you dont.

You both get cut/stabbed.

So.youre odds aint that great from the git go. But this really depends on how much the element of surprise is involved. For me, Im not trying to stab you at all, Im slashing your knife arm/hands. Been practicing that for eighteen years now. I do more knife training now than fight training.

When I first became a cop we had a video that was shown to new recruits as part of academy training. It was called "Edged Weapons. Ninety percent of it was film of blade encounters, including one of a man, obviously in a mental health crises, slowly carving himself up. It was really nasty.

They stopped showing that film some time ago, too many recruits were getting sick or upset by it. Heaven forbid, we can't have that.
Then the surgery manager calls me at 230 a.m. To come to work ah the smell of blood in the morning, er middle of the night.
 

isshinryuronin

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The basic strategy seems to be:
1. Deflect the knife, no matter what, even if it is only for a second. You may get cut, but don't get stabbed or slashed across an area with a lot of blood vessels near the skin.
2. Immediately go on the attack decisively and take the guy out with your first strike to some critical target. Failing that, your second strike.
On an earlier reply to your post it may have seemed to have been a put down, but it was not meant for you or what you posted. It was more of a comment regarding the need for "extensive study" by the guy you referred to to come up with these strategies. Just want to make that clear.

I fully agree with these two points being among the very most important strategies. I would add a #3, that after the deflection, maintain contact/control of the knife arm so you won't have to deflect it again. Everything is risky in a knife fight. The more a knife is flashing around the more chance you have of getting cut, so finishing the guy ASAP is critical. IMO 95% of knife defense practice should center on these 3 considerations and how to implement them.
 
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