Art most commonly trained in for high-risk careers...

Doc_Jude

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I don't know where you are, but take a look at this:
http://www.cliffstewart.com/
Cliff Stewart and some of his top students are very active in security and bodyguard work. His W.A.R. vids are pretty good too. I can get you a good lead on them if you PM me.
 

tellner

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Masaad Ayoob said about Guru Cliff that "he has more black belts than a men's clothing store" and that he's where the professionals go to train.

It's true. Cliff Stewart is an amazing and very dangerous man who turns out top rank professional students. There's a lot of stuff in his mix from Kenpo and grappling to Silat, lots of Silat, and his vast experience.
 
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Blaze

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I don't know where you are, but take a look at this:
http://www.cliffstewart.com/
Cliff Stewart and some of his top students are very active in security and bodyguard work. His W.A.R. vids are pretty good too. I can get you a good lead on them if you PM me.

Not familiar with this guy, but seems like I should be. Thanks for the
suggestion.

Interestingly, one of the realistic self defense teachers in my city teaches
Parker Kenpo combined with Silat, Kali/Arnis and Kuntao. Seems similar and
maybe my best option.
 

woot

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I would say that whatever the art may be, it most likely has a lot of joint lock and takedown techniques.
 

Blindside

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Blaze,

Where are you? Maybe someone on the board can provide a suggestion.

Lamont
 

SensibleManiac

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Hi I would agree that suggestions would depend on your area.
If your looking into some DVDs, the ones I would recommend are from Richard dimitry, check out www.Senshido.com
Also Marc MacYoung has some very good stuff. He can be checked out at:
http://www.nononsenseselfdefense.com/
Also thse dvds are cost effective and extremely effective:
www.Stealthselfprotection.com
I've worked security in high risk environments before and material from all three have proven beneficial.
You'll most importantly want to train with real resistance and do some emotional climate training.
And if you're looking into a Martial art then yes Judo is very good for that, however Reality Based stuff does offer a more "street" oriented approach.
When it's for real you need an approach that helps you develop your awareness and effectiveness.
I'm extremely grateful to have had both in my training as this helped me get out on top of a few situations that could have ended badly.

My best advice is to never stop training or learning and always stay focused when working dangerous places and neighborhoods. Part of me misses it just thinking about it and a greater part of me doesn't.
Best of luck.
 

shesulsa

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I've worked a little in security - not much but a little.

What I strongly suggest you do is start shopping. Put your feet to the pavement and go see these guys. Talk to the head instructor there about training LEO and SO's specifically, who does it and what does that entail. Ask if you have to go through the ranking system to get the knowledge and ask if you can hang out for a night or two to watch or even participate if you sign a waiver.

See them all. Every single one, even if you *really* like the third or fourth one.

If you're interested in martial arts on the side and don't mind going through the ranking system anyway, that's fine - but if you just want some extra training then you need to find out who will give that to you and at what cost.

Then, go with what you think is right, that will suit your requirements. As security your focus is usually on asset protection, you'll need H2H and possibly CQC, pain compliance and control, good cuffing techniques (if you're allowed to carry and use cuffs - we were), education in non-firearms weaponry depending upon what you're allowed to carry in your area.

See if you can find someone who not only trained but worked with or for law enforcement on some level if you can. They'll have more practice, likely - and that's my opinion from seeing folks teach stuff and who haven't been in the field.

While you're asking around, ask opinions on firearms training and weapons retention - you *will* need retention no matter what you carry.

Good luck and stay safe.
 

shesulsa

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You'll also want to learn some verbal judo, de-escalation techniques, threat level determination.
 

Cruentus

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Near me there are all the usual suspects... Karate, TKD, Judo, Aikido,
Jui Jitsu, MMA, Kung Fu of different varietes, Ninjutsu, Kenpo, FMA,
etc. A couple hours drive there is a Systema, which I think looks
promising but would require me to train in my home gym most of the
time with frequent trips to that dojo for hands-on instruction.

Any and all insights are welcome.

I am of the opinion that the art won't actually matter for your job that much; it will be the tactics that you use rather then the physical skills or techniques.

I don't recommend any art at all. I recommend something reality based.

But, if you want to do an art because you enjoy training and there is that added benefit that it will help you, then I recommend that you pick something grappling oriented because you are in security. As a security officer you will have use of force issues, and may have to grapple to control people rather then beat on em. Also, have it be interactive rather then forms based or esoteric and "self-improvement" oriented. Out of the list, Judo, Jujitsu, and MMA are all good. Systema is OK, but it might not be worth the travel depending on your situation.

You could also do something weapons based as a great alternative choice, like FMA. If you run into the possibilities of dealing with weapons at your job, this might help.

But really, you could take TKD if you enjoy it, and it wouldn't matter that much. It will be your tactics that you use on the job that will matter, not the technique or "style"...
 

Cruentus

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Oh... and I should mention that unless it is shooting, stay away from target focused based systems. That has been real popular lately, but I am of the opinion that it's crap.
 

TaiChiTJ

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You're looking for a magic answer.

You won't find one.

There are some styles that will likely give you quicker results for self-defense than others (Krav Maga, for example, compared to aikido) but all will, if trained for reality, give you practical defense skills. You'll find cops who train in every style from aikido to Zulu spear fighting, if it's available in their area. A lot depends on your goals; are you looking to save your ***, or to arrest the other guy? Different approaches are needed.

You may want to look at some of the Reality Based Self Defense programs, like Peyton Quinn's Adrenal Stress Training, as well as some direct law enforcement/security defensive tactics schools. Just be careful; there are lots of folks who claim to teach that sort of thing without the experience or skills...


Good advice.

I would make the time to visit all these schools that you say are around you and just watch. Don't nag and waste time but do spend a minute with the instructor. Does he or she look like someone you would want to learn from? Mention your job and career aspirations. Does the teacher think the curriculum the school presents educates a security officer walking alone on concrete or asphalt, alone, with nothing but a baton, at 2 or 3 in the morning? Is a multi-opponent attack simulated, and how soon in the syllabus? If the teacher says something like, "Oh sure, 3rd year students get into that...", think about whether you want to wait that long. How are multi-opponent attacks simulated? with you barefoot and wearing a nice comfortable gi, in a room well lit with the bright flourescents? If that's the case, its going to be up to you to shut the lights off in your garage with some friends simulating attacks to get close to the real thing.

good luck!
:supcool:
 
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Blaze

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Wow, you guys are awesome. The great suggestions and advice just
keep coming... and coming...

Lots for me to think about. Thanks again everyone!
 

harold

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Hey gang

I'm a security officer in a fairly high-risk environment, and feel the need
to upgrade my H2H training beyond the basic training I got with the job.

What martial arts are most commonly trained in among other high-risk,
need-to-survive careers like police, military, security, bodyguards,
etc? And why?

Thanks for the help!

Try different things such as Krav Maga, Systema, and Filipino Martial Arts. A good Kenpo school might be worth checking out but I would suggest that you be wary of any sport oriented martial art.While the aerobic content of these programs is good, the combat aspect, in my opinion, leaves a lot to be desired. As Bruce Lee said (paraphrasing) ' use what works for you and discard what doesn't'
 
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