Any one interested in learning Xingyi?

xingyiquan

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wants to see if there is anyone would be interested learning this art in WNY area.

Here is an overview of the art just in case for some one never heard of it, since it is not a very popular art in the states
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Xingyiquan features aggressive shocking attacks and direct footwork. The linear nature of Xingyiquan hints at both the military origins and the influence of spear technique alluded to in its mythology. Despite its hard, angular appearance, cultivating "soft" internal strength or qi is essential to achieving power in Xingyiquan.
The goal of the Xingyiquan fighter is to reach the opponent quickly and drive powerfully through them in a single burst the analogy with spear fighting is useful here. This is achieved by coordinating one's body as a single unit and the intense focusing of one's qi.
Efficiency and economy of movement are the qualities of a Xingyiquan fighter and its direct fighting philosophy advocates simultaneous attack and defence. There are few kicks except for extremely low foot kicks (which avoids the hazards of balance involved with higher kicks) and some mid-level kicks, and techniques are prized for their deadliness rather than aesthetic value. Xingyiquan favours a high stance called Sāntǐsh穫 (三體式), literally "three bodies power," referring to how the stance holds the head, torso and feet along the same vertical plane. A common saying of Xingyiquan is that "the hands do not leave the heart and the elbows do not leave the ribs." Another characteristic common to many styles of XingYi is a stance called "Dragon Body". This is a forward stance similar to a bow stance with a straight line from the head to the heel of the back foot and the front foot perpendicular to the ground. This is not so much a separate stance or technique in itself as a principle of movement to provide power to techniques.
The use of the Santishi as the main stance and training method originated from Li Luoneng's branch of Xingyi. Early branches such as Dai family style do not use Santi as the primary stance nor as a training method.

Five Element Forms
Xingyiquan uses the five classical Chinese elements to metaphorically represent five different states of combat. Also called the "Five Fists" or "Five Phases," the Five Elements are related to Taoist cosmology although the names do not literally correspond to the cosmological terms.
Xingyiquan practitioners use the Five Elements as an interpretative framework for reacting and responding to attacks. This follows the Five Element theory, a general combat formula which assumes at least three outcomes of a fight; the constructive, the neutral, and the destructive. Xingyiquan students train to react to and execute specific techniques in such a way that a desirable cycle will form based on the constructive, neutral and destructive interactions of Five Element theory. Where to aim, where to hit and with what techniqueand how those motions should work defensivelyis determined by what point of which cycle they see themselves in.
Each of the elements has variant applications that allow it to be used to defend against all of the elements (including itself), so any set sequences are entirely arbitrary, though the destructive cycle is often taught to beginners as it is easier to visualise and consists of easier applications. Some schools will teach the Five Elements before the Ten Animals because they are easier and shorter to learn.

Animal forms
Xingyiquan is based on twelve distinct animal forms (形; pinyin: x穩ng). Present in all regional and family styles, these emulate the techniques and tactics of the corresponding animal rather than just their physical movements. Many schools of Xingyiquan have only small number of movements for each animal, though some teach extended sequences of movements. Once the individual animal forms are taught, a student is often taught an animal linking form (shi'er xing lianhuan) which connects all the taught animals together in a sequence. Some styles have longer, or multiple forms for individual animals, such Eight Tiger Forms Huxing bashi.
The Twelve animalsChinesePinyinBear熊Xi籀ngIn Xingyi, "the Bear and Eagle combine," meaning that the Bear and Eagle techniques are often used in conjunction with each other. There is a bird called the "Bear Eagle," which covers the characteristics of both forms.Eagle鷹YīngSnake蛇Sh矇Includes both Constrictor and Viper styles.Tiger虎HǔDragon龍L籀ngThe only "mythical" animal taught.Chicken鷄JīHorse馬MǎSwallow燕YnGoshawk鷂YoThis can mean 'Sparrowhawk,' though the more common word for "Sparrowhawk" used to be Zhān (鸇), which has fallen from use over the years. There are at least two different kinds of birds in China that can be translated as "Goshawk." One is, in Western terms, a Sparrowhawk; the other is same species called a Goshawk in the West.Monkey猴H籀u
Crocodile鼍Tu籀The animal it is meant to represent is the Yangtze River alligator. Sometimes referred to as a water-skimming insect, or water lizard.Tai鳥台 (��)
see noteThis is a flycatcher native to Asia. Due to the rarity of this character it may be translated as Ostrich, Dove, Hawk or even Phoenix. The Chinese for this animal is a single character (��), not two (as written); this character is not in the earlier versions of the Unicode standard so not all computers are capable of displaying it.. For further information on this character, check the Unihan database for complete data on this character.
[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Xingyiquan is a very old Chinese martial art that most believe originated in the early 1600s. It is a very powerful art which is classified as an internal system like it's sister arts Taijiquan (Tai Chi) and Baguaquan. However, Xingyi's mindset is that of an aggressive nature. Where Taijiquan yields and and blends with an opponent's attack, and Bagua circles and evades, Xingyi smashes right through the opponent in a linear fashion with an unrelenting attack.[/FONT][/FONT]

[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Xingyiquan is a very old Chinese martial art that most believe originated in the early 1600s. It is a very powerful art which is classified as an internal system like it's sister arts Taijiquan (Tai Chi) and Baguaquan. However, Xingyi's mindset is that of an aggressive nature. Where Taijiquan yields and and blends with an opponent's attack, and Bagua circles and evades, Xingyi smashes right through the opponent in a linear fashion with an unrelenting attack.[/FONT][/FONT][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]
Xingyiquan is a no-nonsense fighting system - relatively easy to learn, but difficult and long to master. Proper body mechanics and quieting of the mind and body are of utmost importance to excel in this art. The power is generated from the ground in the Xingyi practitioner's legs, funneled up through the body and out the arms. In fact, when the practitioner strikes, he is striking with his entire body, not just his fists.

The heart of Xingyi are five fist forms or "wu xing." These are short repetitive forms each depicted by the Chinese five elements of metal, wood, water, fire and earth. Each one generates a different kind of energy or fighting power and each one corresponds to an internal organ of the body. Advanced training introduces twelve animal forms based on the five fists.
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[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]
Xingyiquan is a no-nonsense fighting system - relatively easy to learn, but difficult and long to master. Proper body mechanics and quieting of the mind and body are of utmost importance to excel in this art. The power is generated from the ground in the Xingyi practitioner's legs, funneled up through the body and out the arms. In fact, when the practitioner strikes, he is striking with his entire body, not just his fists.

The heart of Xingyi are five fist forms or "wu xing." These are short repetitive forms each depicted by the Chinese five elements of metal, wood, water, fire and earth. Each one generates a different kind of energy or fighting power and each one corresponds to an internal organ of the body. Advanced training introduces twelve animal forms based on the five fists.
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Darksoul

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-Where was this before I decided to move to Denver? Haha! Xingyi has interested me for some time now, out of the three internal arts, I would love to train that one. Oh well, perhaps I'll find something enjoyable when I move. I'm sure someone in WNY would jump at the chance. Good luck!

Andrew
 

arnisador

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I spoke to a TKD black belt this week who is teaching himself Hsing-I from books, and proposes to teach others...I was, shall we say, concerned.
 
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xingyiquan

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I spoke to a TKD black belt this week who is teaching himself Hsing-I from books, and proposes to teach others...I was, shall we say, concerned.
uh...learning xingyi from books? I would be concerned too......anyway, good luck to him.
 

baron

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i would be interested in seeing this art and might consider studying it. are you teaching it?
 
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xingyiquan

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i would be interested in seeing this art and might consider studying it. are you teaching it?
Thinking about it, but not sure if there is going to be anyone interested.
 

Kythkyn

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I know there is interest at leats on my part. I sent you an e-mail a few weeks back but we haven't heard back. If you are still interested in teaching please let us know. Thank you.
 

Karshkin

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If your haven't found a place to teach yet you might want to try to ask the local dojos. A lot of them will let you teach a couple of times a week
 
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xingyiquan

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If your haven't found a place to teach yet you might want to try to ask the local dojos. A lot of them will let you teach a couple of times a week
Thanks for the info.
here is a video link of my kungfu brother doing xingyi: he did a demo of free style, and that's how it looks like in combat, there are few elements and animal forms of xingyi in the demo, such as beng(crushing), pi (spliting), tiger etc.. the camera wasn't a very good one, so we asked him to slow down for the camera, he actually moves faster than in the video. I have some more I will upload them later.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MZB91lqo9G8&feature=related
 

championmarius

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I don't know if it may be a bit late, but I have developed a particular desire to explore human motion through the CMA's, mainly Xing-yi, Taiji and Bagua. If you are still entertaining the notion of forming a study group, then I'm all for it!
 
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xingyiquan

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there is going to be a gathering for the Buffalo Martial Arts Group from meetup.com. I will probably show up there, everyone is welcome to join.
Below is the infomation:
Since the weather is getting very nice and the group meetings haven't been happening I propose that we start meeting Sunday April 27, 2008 at 10:00 AM. Let's meet at Cafe Aroma, on the corner of Elmwood Ave and Bidwell Parkway.
If the weather is cooperative we can leave the cafe and play outside in the park.
Whom ever is willing can talk about and/or demonstrate their style and we can discuss future meetings and what the group would like to do at the meetings.
Hope to see you there.
 
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