An Indian students thoughts on life in America

billc

Grandmaster
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2007
Messages
9,183
Reaction score
85
Location
somewhere near Lake Michigan
Nice to see America in a positive light from someone who isn't swimming in American culture their whole life...

An almost-classless society: I've noticed that most Americans roughly have the same standard of living. Everybody has access to ample food, everybody shops at the same supermarkets, malls, stores, etc. I've seen plumbers, construction workers and janitors driving their own sedans, which was quite difficult for me to digest at first since I came from a country where construction workers and plumbers lived hand to mouth.
Also, (almost) all sections of society are roughly equal. You'll see service professionals owning iPhones, etc. as well. This may be wrong but part of it has to do with the fact that obtaining credit in this country is extremely easy. Anybody can buy anything, for the most part, except for something like a Maserati, obviously. As a result, most monetary possessions aren't really status symbols. I believe that the only status symbol in America is your job, and possibly your educational qualifications.

Almost every single person in America has access to basic food, clothing, water and sanitation. I haven't been to states like Louisiana and cities like Detroit, but from what I can tell, nobody is scrambling for the basic necessities required for sustenance.


He would probably be surprised by Louisiana and Detroit as well, compared to third world countries...

The pervasiveness of fast food and the sheer variety of products available: The typical supermarket has at least a hundred varieties of frozen pizza, 50 brands of trail mix, etc. I was just astounded by the different kinds of products available even at small gas station convenience stores.


I remember back in the early 90's I knew a woman who had relatives visiting her from Lithuania. She told me that after picking them up at the airport they had to stop at the local Jewel to get some things for the welcome party that night. She went into the store, bringing them with, and as she walked forward into the store she noticed that they weren't with her. She turned around and said they were just standing there...staring all around them. She told me they asked her "Where did all this food come from..." They told her that the sheer amount and variety of the food was to them...amazing.

I think that is one of the moments that helped me see the United States as something other than what I was getting in school or the news...that perhaps...just perhaps...America wasn't the bad place so many people here think it is...

Also, (almost) all sections of society are roughly equal. You'll see service professionals owning iPhones, etc. as well. This may be wrong

It is curious to think that everyone having access to Iphones might be wrong...
 
Last edited:

Sukerkin

Have the courage to speak softly
MT Mentor
Lifetime Supporting Member
MTS Alumni
Joined
Sep 15, 2006
Messages
15,318
Reaction score
481
Location
Staffordshire, England
It is great to see an 'outsiders' view of your country - it makes you appreciate what you have sometimes.

I recall having a conversation with an Indian fellow quite a few years back now and being surprised at his surprise at things I take for granted. The one that always stuck in my mind was his evident delight and surprise at telling me that when you call the police here they actually come ... to where you are ... and they don't expect a bribe to do their job or beat you for wasting their time!
 
OP
Tgace

Tgace

Grandmaster
Joined
Jul 31, 2003
Messages
7,766
Reaction score
409
I always find an outside perspective interesting....


And a good plumber here can make a comfortable living....probably even better than me. :)


Sent from my Kindle Fire using Tapatalk 2
 

Sukerkin

Have the courage to speak softly
MT Mentor
Lifetime Supporting Member
MTS Alumni
Joined
Sep 15, 2006
Messages
15,318
Reaction score
481
Location
Staffordshire, England
Oddly enough, in that same conversation, I did make the point that there was a sort of unwritten 'social contract' that you didn't call the police unless it was something that really merited their attention.
 

billc

Grandmaster
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2007
Messages
9,183
Reaction score
85
Location
somewhere near Lake Michigan
Wait...soooo are you saying that if McDonalds runs out of Chicken Mcnuggets that you shouldn't call the police...wow...that must be a European thing...:angel:
 

ballen0351

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Dec 25, 2010
Messages
10,480
Reaction score
1,246
People have called our 911 center because the air planes are too loud, There was a news paper in their driveway and they dont get the paper its a trap, The Burger King drive thru line is too slow. Just a few I remember off the top of my head
 

billc

Grandmaster
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2007
Messages
9,183
Reaction score
85
Location
somewhere near Lake Michigan
Sadly, no...

http://www.foxnews.com/story/2009/03/04/florida-woman-calls-11-after-mcdonald-runs-out-mcnuggets/

A Florida woman called 911 three times after she paid for a 10-piece Chicken McNuggets at a McDonald's but the fast-food restaurant ran out of them and refused to give her a refund.
Latreasa L. Goodman, 27, made the calls after she tried to get her money back from a Fort Pierce McDonald's and the cashier told her all sales were final. Police released the 911 tapes.

This was more a matter for calling the corporate headquarters rather than the police...
 

Sukerkin

Have the courage to speak softly
MT Mentor
Lifetime Supporting Member
MTS Alumni
Joined
Sep 15, 2006
Messages
15,318
Reaction score
481
Location
Staffordshire, England
My word! Well ... I am lost for something to say ... which doesn't happen all that often :eek:.
 
Top