A change of plan , going to join a taekwondo class on saturday and sunday !!!!!!

ghostrider33

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Due to time constraints , i have ditched the plan to join the evening kickboxing classes ... because i am too tired in the evening after my work ...

Instead i am going to join a taekwondo training school ...

They have classes on saturday and sunday morning ....

:)
 

Jared Traveler

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Due to time constraints , i have ditched the plan to join the evening kickboxing classes ... because i am too tired in the evening after my work ...

Instead i am going to join a taekwondo training school ...

They have classes on saturday and sunday morning ....

:)
That's definitely a change in direction on your martial arts journey.
 
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ghostrider33

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That's definitely a change in direction on your martial arts journey.

Yup ...

My original plan was to join the kickboxing training in the evening after i come back from work ...

But that is not going to happen ... as i lack energy to follow that in the evening ...

So i googled martial arts training in my area and found a taekwondo training school

And saturday and sunday morning is sort of ok to train for that ...

The classes are from 7.30 to 9 ...

I think i suddenly like the levels and belts in it

:)
 
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ghostrider33

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Wow, night and day for sure. Same school as your daughter?

This is morning classes on saturday and sunday

from 7.30 am to 9 am ...

My daughter is in a different school ...

I don't want to train in the same school she goes ...

That would be a bit awkward ....

:)
 
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ghostrider33

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I have no idea how i am going to manage stretching like this ...

I should have started training at least 10 years ago ...

flexibilitykids-1024x665.jpg


stretchingkick.jpg



:)
 

Gyakuto

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Few people are flexible when they start MA training奸ike the MAs themselves, they have to be worked at and you will get there in time. Do a little bit of stretching everyday多amstrings and leg adductors in particular as they become tighter as we get older and are important for most kicks.

The principles in this video are sound.
 

_Simon_

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Fantastic to hear!!! The start of a MA journey is always so exciting.

Ah yep, never compare yourself to others' flexibility, especially pictures of weeeeell seasoned martial artists. You're only just starting out, step by step and your flexibility will improve.

Have an absolute blast training @ghostrider33 , how exciting for you, let us know how you go okay!
 
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ghostrider33

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Few people are flexible when they start MA training奸ike the MAs themselves, they have to be worked at and you will get there in time. Do a little bit of stretching everyday多amstrings and leg adductors in particular as they become tighter as we get older and are important for most kicks.

Thanks for your advice ...

Once i join , i will join in january first week itself ... i will try to find some time and i will try to do these exercises ...

progress slowly , i have learned that from my past experiences ...

:)
 
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ghostrider33

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Fantastic to hear!!! The start of a MA journey is always so exciting.

Ah yep, never compare yourself to others' flexibility, especially pictures of weeeeell seasoned martial artists. You're only just starting out, step by step and your flexibility will improve.

Have an absolute blast training @ghostrider33 , how exciting for you, let us know how you go okay!

Yea , you are so right .. i am so excited like a 20 year old ...

Thanks for your advice

:)
 

Jared Traveler

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I have been trying to read about taekwondo .... most of the comments on the internet were like taekwondo is about punches and kicks ...

Then i found this website ...

https://ymaa.com/sites/default/files/book/sample/Taekwondo-Defense-Against-Weapons.pdf

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taekwondo3.png


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So taekwondo training also teaches things like these right ?

:)
You will find many people on here who started in TKD then intentionally moved on to other systems. I certainly can respect the offensive power of TKD strikes, the same way I can respect the ballistic path of a .22 rimfire bullet (I don't want to be hit with either one), even though neither is my preferred weapon of choice. But neither of these things are ideal for self-defense. You are unlikely to learn realistic self-defense in a TKD school. Primarily because you learn how to fight other TKD martial artists, and not against realistic attacks from trained or untrained fighters in a self-defense situation.
 
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ghostrider33

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You will find many people on here who started in TKD then intentionally moved on to other systems. I certainly can respect the offensive power of TKD strikes, the same way I can respect the ballistic path of a .22 rimfire bullet (I don't want to be hit with either one), even though neither is my preferred weapon of choice. But neither of these things are ideal for self-defense. You are unlikely to learn realistic self-defense in a TKD school. Primarily because you learn how to fight other TKD martial artists, and not against realistic attacks from trained or untrained fighters in a self-defense situation.

Thanks for the reply ...

After thinking about it for a while ,



I think for me , I need to begin somewhere ... and this taekwondo classes would be a good place to start ...

In the future if i need to change to a different martial art , i can do that too ...



:)
 

Tony Dismukes

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Just a reminder that art-bashing is against the rules on this forum.

It's acceptable to voice one's opinions regarding the relative strengths and weaknesses of a system or the usefulness of various approaches to training. But be aware that once you start edging towards "art x is no good for fighting" or "art y isn't good for self-defense", then you may be crossing the lines of what is allowable on this website.
 

Tony Dismukes

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I have been trying to read about taekwondo .... most of the comments on the internet were like taekwondo is about punches and kicks ...

Then i found this website ...

https://ymaa.com/sites/default/files/book/sample/Taekwondo-Defense-Against-Weapons.pdf

Untitled.png


taekwondo3.png


Untitled2.png


So taekwondo training also teaches things like these right ?

:)
Just so you know, even the very best techniques for unarmed defense against a knife wielding attacker are low-percentage and not anything you ever want to be in the position of having to rely on in a real life-or-death situation.

In my opinion, techniques like the one pictured in your post are not among those best techniques. That's not to say they can never work - but they're a sub-optimal approach to an already very difficult problem.

This isn't particularly a knock against TKD specifically. Very few arts have good approaches to unarmed defense against knives or other weapons. And even the best techniques will have a dangerously high failure rate.
Primarily because you learn how to fight other TKD martial artists, and not against realistic attacks from trained or untrained fighters in a self-defense situation.
Honestly, "because you learn how to fight other *insert art here* martial artists, and not against realistic attacks from trained or untrained fighters in a self-defense situation," is a fair criticism of the majority of martial arts schools in most systems. And the arts which do purport to address "realistic attacks" often have other issues worthy of criticism.

As a BJJ instructor, I do try to teach my students how to deal with "realistic attacks from trained or untrained fighters in a self-defense situation", but I'd be lying if I said that the majority of class time in the majority of BJJ schools wasn't devoted towards practicing how to out-submission grapple another submission grappler in a ground-fighting context. Those skills can be applied to defending against realistic attacks in a self-defense situation, just as TKD skills can be applied to defending against realistic attacks in a self-defense situation. But the instructor has to 1) understand realistic attacks in a self-defense situation and 2) be willing to devote class time to dealing with those scenarios. (Note this may include spending time teaching students the skills to feed those sorts of realistic attacks, which may not be part of the art's regular curriculum.)
 

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My daughter is in a different school ...
I don't want to train in the same school she goes ...
That would be a bit awkward ....
Why? I have trained tons of family groups, and can't even count how many I've seen over the years. I trained my wife and some of our kids. Nothing awkward about it.

I have no idea how i am going to manage stretching like this ...

I should have started training at least 10 years ago ...
You don't training in a Martial Art because you're flexible, you get flexible because you train.

I have been trying to read about taekwondo .... most of the comments on the internet were like taekwondo is about punches and kicks ...

So taekwondo training also teaches things like these right ?
Depends on the school. Some schools (especially Kukkiwon schools) are very very focused on Olympic sparring. Because of this narrow focus, these schools often fail to teach the entirety of the Art.
Talk to the instructors about the curriculum.

You will find many people on here who started in TKD then intentionally moved on to other systems.
Really???? So, do you know someone who accidentally changed systems?
I certainly can respect the offensive power of TKD strikes, the same way I can respect the ballistic path of a .22 rimfire bullet (I don't want to be hit with either one), even though neither is my preferred weapon of choice. But neither of these things are ideal for self-defense.
And yet, somehow, despite this terrible handicap, thousands of TKD practitioners around the world have managed to successfully defend themselves using their training. I've been in literally hundreds of violent confrontations. And somehow, I am still alive.
You are unlikely to learn realistic self-defense in a TKD school. Primarily because you learn how to fight other TKD martial artists, and not against realistic attacks from trained or untrained fighters in a self-defense situation.
Nonsense. In ANY martial art, you're going to be learning to fight against other practitioners of that art. Because that's who you're training and sparring with.
The basic principles of timing, distancing, striking, unbalancing, etc are the same, regardless of the art.
 
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Dirty Dog

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Just so you know, even the very best techniques for unarmed defense against a knife wielding attacker are low-percentage and not anything you ever want to be in the position of having to rely on in a real life-or-death situation.
Very true. Real life is not at all like Hollywood.
In my opinion, techniques like the one pictured in your post are not among those best techniques. That's not to say they can never work - but they're a sub-optimal approach to an already very difficult problem.

This isn't particularly a knock against TKD specifically. Very few arts have good approaches to unarmed defense against knives or other weapons. And even the best techniques will have a dangerously high failure rate.
I am not convinced there ARE good approaches to unarmed defense against a weapon. Because a good approach would need to be successful more often than not.

I have long maintained that the best defense against an armed assailant is a combination of Run-Fu and Chic-Chic-Bang.
 

Tony Dismukes

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I am not convinced there ARE good approaches to unarmed defense against a weapon. Because a good approach would need to be successful more often than not.
Marc Denny has a video series entitled "Die Less Often," focused on dealing with armed attackers. The idea isn't so much "here are the secrets which will allow you to effortlessly overcome a knife-wielding maniac" and more "in the many parallel universes where you train this way, you will get killed less often than in the universes where you don't." I respect that level of humility.

(I should also note that a high percentage of the material seems to be concerned with surviving the initial assault long enough to deploy your own carry weapon.)
 

Dirty Dog

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Marc Denny has a video series entitled "Die Less Often," focused on dealing with armed attackers. The idea isn't so much "here are the secrets which will allow you to effortlessly overcome a knife-wielding maniac" and more "in the many parallel universes where you train this way, you will get killed less often than in the universes where you don't." I respect that level of humility.
That's one of the Dog Brothers videos, if I recall. They do some good stuff.
I think the best we can say for any unarmed vs armed defense is "it's better than nothing".
(I should also note that a high percentage of the material seems to be concerned with surviving the initial assault long enough to deploy your own carry weapon.)
That's the most practical approach. I sort of think that could be in a separate category than actual unarmed vs armed defenses. Avoiding the first strike and drawing your own weapon is vastly different to subduing them without a weapon.
 

Jared Traveler

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And yet, somehow, despite this terrible handicap, thousands of TKD practitioners around the world have managed to successfully defend themselves using their training. I've been in literally hundreds of violent confrontations. And somehow, I am still alive.

Nonsense. In ANY martial art, you're going to be learning to fight against other practitioners of that art. Because that's who you're training and sparring with.
The basic principles of timing, distancing, striking, unbalancing, etc are the same, regardless of the art.
I totally agree, as stated I would not want to be hit by those kicks or punches. I also agree that you typically learn to fight against someone participating in the same rules as your system. Although certainly this isn't always true of other arts.
 
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