When you don't want to train...

Discussion in 'Beginners Corner' started by RubberDuck, Jun 30, 2009.

  1. Cirdan

    Cirdan Senior Master

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    When I don`t feel like going.. I just go anyway. Don`t think, just DO.

    Do NOT lie down on the evil couch, not until after training.
     
  2. still learning

    still learning Senior Master

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    Hello, Great points from above...just wanted to add this...

    "Where would you like to be 5 years from now, 10 years from now, etc..."
    ...if you didn't stop training???

    Goals...easy to stop....reaching them...is hard work....

    Next point: Most of us will never get into "fights" ...ask you Mom and Dads....Verbal works..

    Aloha,

    PS: Being prepare is also good too...MA's
     
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  3. Bruno@MT

    Bruno@MT Senior Master

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    How it is different?

    1) Physical MA skills will not help me with that.
    2) In order to stay on top of my game, I spend much of my free time learning new technologies and languages and doing research. All that time I cannot put in physical MA training.

    Do you spend time learning new languages, other databases, new platforms, or things like that?
    If so, that is time you cannot spend on physical MA practise. If you want to be really on top of -that- game, you cannot also spend the same amount of time on MA practise.

    Btw, the network I currently manage is completely separate from the outside world. People don't even have physical access to the machines. So I am not thinking about digital attackers all the time. I do not live with the idea that people are continuously trying to attack my network. If you are a database administrator for a large connected network, I agree that the situation is different.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2009
  4. Live True

    Live True Brown Belt

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    First, an aside to wolfeyes and Bruno....I have read many posts by both of you, and I respect a lot of what you both have to say. You bring up good points, and clearly are at a stage where you can give some useful advice and opinions on Martial arts...that said...life is not a black and white situation.

    It appears that Wolfeyes is arguing that you are either a warrior or you are not. It is not that simple. I do believe that there are those who are called or are fortunate to choose and train in the lifestyle of a warrior. There are many discussions on what that term means, which we'll not reopen here. Suffice it to say that we can all have the ability to draw on the part of us that is warrior. And many men and women have done so in times of crises and then gone back to thier ordinary lives afterwards. Are they as capable and skilled as a trained warrior...no...but thier heart and spirit/will can sometimes bridge the gap.

    You are fortunate that you have the calling, ability , and luck to make MA your lifestyle. Most of us are not that fortunate. But do not have the pride to beleive that makes you a better warrior than all of those who cannot focus so much of their time in practice. Technical skill is a major component in a fight, and I am not denying that hours of daily practice make a more skilled fighter. I am simply stating that ANY practice makes one a better fighter than they would have been. And you cannot underestimate will, determination, or motivation as a large part of any fight as well.
    <><>
    Bruno, it appears that you are arguing that MA can fit into the spaces in between your life's obligations, and you are sounding a bit angry or irritated that Wolfeyes is saying you are then only a hobbyist and not a serious MA'ist. I actually agree with both of you...to an extent.

    I ABSOLUTELY agree that family is first, and life happens. I ABSOLUTELY agree that most of us do not make our life through MA, so it is not a major part of our life. I also, ABSOLUTELY agree that if you are a serious MAist, then it should flow throughout many parts of your life. NOW, I do not believe it's one or the other. I've discussed with many of my freinds how I hit a spot after a year of training where I suddenly realized that MA had seeped into a lot of little things I do on a daily basis. I am more aware of my surroundings, more likely to use an elbow strike or targeted shoken to turn off the plate light switches, kicks to open doors, etc. I am much more likely to stand up for myself and others in big and little things.

    I have a 10 month old little girl, and I commute 2 hours/day to and form work. I cannot devote as much time as I'd like to my practice...but I do what I can and I focus intently in the time I have....the rest is somethign that simply flows through my day. Others may call me a hobbyist, and I am not 100% sure if they realize how insulting and belittling that sounds. Even if it may be true, it is a label I do not accept. I am a uechiteka. I practice a martial arts that flows through my day. It does not consume me, but it is a long term part of my life from now until it ends. It is a part of me, not something I do just for fun (although I do have lots of fun). I am at the start of a long journey, and it is part of me. How can that make it a hobby?

    So...gentlemen, please remember the world is not black and white...and most of us live in the shades of grey in between. This is not bad. It's simply is.
     
  5. Bruno@MT

    Bruno@MT Senior Master

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    Not angry, no.
    It's just that I am a bit annoyed with people (in general) who insist on absolutes. Black and white. According to some posters, I can only be
    a) a warrior who dedicates his life to MA
    b) a hobbyist whose heart isn't in it.

    I fall in between. And just because I cannot / will not dedicate my life to MA does not mean I should be classifieds under option (B). I find it pretty insulting actually, if people do so. Or like a couple of months ago, when someone told me (us) to take up dancing if I didn't want to spar full contact.

    I agree with you for 100%.

    My commute is shorter, but I have 2 little kids (2 and 4) and a wife who works a job with responsibilities. This means I have to take care of the household in the evening, cook, wash the kids, put them in bed and read bedtime stories. What time I have left is then divided between

    a) renovating the house
    b) computer programming stuff
    c) spending some time with my wife
    d) MA
    e) spending some time on my hobby.

    The fact that I haven't missed a single class last season, met up with my sensei for extra practise, and practised at home every free moment I have should speak for me and how serious I take MA, I feel. Yet because I did not sacrifice a, b,c or e, I get labeled a hobbyist.

    I know. That was my point, and the reason I was getting a bit annoyed at some of the arguments in this thread.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2009
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  6. Live True

    Live True Brown Belt

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    Now, to the OP...rubberduck, I'm a female as well, but your question is not a male/female specific problem, as you can probably tell from the post. Monthly issues aside, we all have those up/down days.

    Here's my 2 cents FWIW:
    • Practice daily, that helps ingrain the habit of training, whether you are in class or not
      • part of this is to practice at home
      • even 15 min/day can realize real benefit in your training and technique..and your mental awareness and focus as well
        • I find that 15-30/min a day helps me deal with the daily stressors of being a new mommy (very active and inquisitive 10 month old), job (recent layoffs I just avoided, 2 hr commute, etc.), and life in general
    • 5 min rule-whether it be the gym or class, I try to follow the 5 min rule
      • This is where you get dressed and go whether you feel like it or not and give it 5 min to determine if you are truly not feeling it or if you were just being tired/lazy/whiny/bored/what-have-you
      • 9 times out of 10 it is something like the above, and the energy of being in class or working out will kick in and you'll be glad you showed up
      • Sometimes, just the fact you are already there will keep you going until those little endorphins and the rest can kick in
      • On rare occassions, you will still feel crappy and unmotivated, in those cases, it is best to make your apologies, pack it up, and go home.
      • The one time I did this in the last 12 months, I was at the beginning stages of a VERY nasty flu bug. My going home prevented a lot of my fellow classmates from getting sick, and allowed my body time to heal.
    • be in it for the long haul
      • Short term goals are useful, but if you are in it only for the short term goals like kicking X's butt or earning a (choose appropriate color) belt...then your motivations might come and go.
      • Have long term goals of learning to be a martial artist, fostering my inner warrior, being worth of teaching others, etc....then you may realize that these goals are the accumulation of a lot of hours and repetition
      • But each moment hones the person you want to be, like chips in marble...it takes time but the end result should be a beautiful realization of essence.
    • little things
      • sometimes the focus on little things can help too
      • focusing on perfecting that opening stance can provide a short term goal/challenge that you just "gotta" master
      • and of course, as noted in my last post, those little daily things to remind you of what you are gaining by practice (strength, confidence, focus, health....)
    • embrace the suck
      • goes back to the long haul, and this is a phrase I just became acquainted with...sometimes....you just gotta know that it's gonna suck/be boring/repetitive/etc...and just do it anyway
      • And over time you will realize that those repetitive drills, etc. made a significant different in your strength, targeting, etc.
    • family-as a parent, sometimes the best motivation is my child
      • When I practice at home, she sees me being strong and focused
      • As she grows, she will see that health is a priority, and that it can be fun as well
      • AS she growns, she will also know that women can/should be strong and able to defend themselves
      • Not only does my practice help me....it will provide a good example for my daughter so she can grow into a strong, confident, healthy young woman.
    Those are some thoughts off the top of my head.

    BTW, it's a bit late, but CONGRATS on the testings!!! Every step forward is a victory..and some of the steps back can be as well.

    Good luck and enjoy this addition to your life!
     
  7. still learning

    still learning Senior Master

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    Hello, ...want to learn? ...... is to want to train!

    One has to love it....or leave it............

    Aloha, ... funny there is a love and hate relationships at times?
     
  8. wolfeyes2323

    wolfeyes2323 Orange Belt

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    There is only black and white, ( and a greater and lesser of each)
    Yin and Yang have no shades, But there is a balance which never stops changing .

    There is a reason that traditional Martial arts are called, Ways , or paths.
    Bu-do, or Wu-shu , They are solitary paths ,
    ( ways of Not fighting, not OF fighting ),

    &#8220;A persons Heart/mind is the same as heaven and earth &#8220;

    When we first begin training a martial art, we use discipline of the body ,
    to train the mind, and spirit, It is difficult to be ONE,
    and coordinate the three into one (spirit, mind ,body)
    we learn to do this in short time frames, the duration
    of sitting or moving meditation (or forms),

    We then learn to turn this mind frame on at will,
    it is the Mind we use to deal with serious life and death issues and
    crisis. This may be helping others , as well as harming others.
    Are we strong enough of mind to see serious injury, crisis and
    chaos , remain calm , and deal with these events and circumstances ?
    This is the One Mind/heart .

    As we progress the ability to hold this frame of mind increases,
    we can keep it throughout the entire training session,
    and it becomes easier to turn on and off,

    Then we find that we exit the training hall with the same mind,
    and that this one mind begins to become our normal mind,
    and then we find that it becomes difficult to turn off , even if
    we so desire.

    This is when we see that the strategies of Martial arts
    are used constantly against us in life ,on the street , In business,
    in jobs and our work, in the world in general (all under heaven and on earth) ,
    LIFE is the Battle ground , and yes people will take advantage of our good
    nature, our lack of vigilance , and our lack of attention,

    people will over charge us if they can, they will tell us that we
    need things that we do not, our employer will manipulate us,
    our fellow workers will step on us and take the promotion that
    we have worked for , The neighbor will put his fence on our land,
    the kid around the corner will rob our garage,
    hackers will attack your computer, they will steal your
    Wifi at home , they will steal your identity, your money ,
    and if you are not careful your life.
    there are those that will attack your wife, your children , your,
    your parents , friends and relatives ,
    these attacks and the methods of dealing with them
    all work according to Martial principle.

    It is why Sun Tzu&#8217;s Art of war is read world wide , by business men,
    as well as military people..

    Where do you draw the line ?
    You can not always get physical,
    you can be beat up, chewed up , and spit out,
    without ever having a opportunity or need
    to be physical. They are using martial principles
    against you, attacking you, and all that you
    love and hold in your heart, and you also can use
    your martial mind/heart to deal with them, and
    prevent this.

    Person heart same heaven earth

    Martial arts are about training the heart and Mind,
    this begins with training the body , but this is not the
    end, or goal.

    I assumed that the person who began this thread was a
    martial artist at heart (a student of Wing chun) , if not ,
    and you practice a sport or a fighting method, then I really
    have no answer to why you should train further .
    I would not want to go either.

    perhaps the thing to do is ask your self why did Wing Chun
    develop her method, what was her goal,
    how much dedication was required , etc.

    It seem logical to me that we can not expect to
    master a method by not following the way
    set out by its creator.

    Romney^..^

     
  9. wolfeyes2323

    wolfeyes2323 Orange Belt

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    Greetings &#8211; I am not a practitioner of Wing chun ,
    I actually practice Okinawan arts,
    but I do have a associate that uses the school to
    teach Wing Chun, I also had the pleasure and
    privilege to train with Mr Liu Chang I , Feeding
    Crane kung fu (From Taiwan ), who has visited my school on
    several occasions . Feeding Crane and most other
    Crane methods are all attributed to the same creator
    Wing Chun.

    I have had several long conversation
    with Mr Liu , and trained under him, learning his short power
    methods and exercises. I know what he expects , and
    what he says is necessary to become proficient at this
    style, he has sets of exercises that should be practice
    100X several times a day. In the training session
    with Mr Liu, most people , (even those who train
    regularly ) find it difficult to perform 25 repetitions
    of many of these exercise sets, Once in a day.
    Last time Mr liu was here , I was sore for a week after
    he left , and I normally train (in other arts ) daily.

    I also know that Mr liu says
    &#8220;Feeding Crane kill you one second &#8220;
    and if you train with him, he demonstrates as much.

    Mr liu says that we are training for that ONE time in
    our life that we need our art to defend or preserve
    life.

    This is my motivation, that when the wheel turns,
    and I am called upon to act on the behalf of my self
    or others, that I will have no regrets about my
    preparation or training,

    Temper this motivation with Love , and
    you have the makings of a Martial artist,

    this is where I was speaking from,
    and I think I have now said all that I can.

    Romney^..^
     
  10. Live True

    Live True Brown Belt

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    Romney,
    Again, I respect your viewpoint, and it has much worth consideration and use in it. That said, In my opinion, you have not found the balance of yin yang as you state. Your world seems heavily lopsided toward negative possibilities and training to be prepared.

    Even samurai wrote Haiku.

    You only mention your family as something to protect. Do they not bring you joy? Do you spend time with them?

    I agree..protect them, teach them to be strong...but also honor them for who and what they are.

    Again, you train and make a living through your martial arts. Most of us do not have that option or choose that path. That does not make us lesser warriors. It simply means we do define ourselves by your standards.

    In my opinion, living as a warrior is fine, but a warrior must also appreciate what he/she is protecting and living for. If you don't appreciate life, if you only train...then your path is hollow.

    I can respect your technical advice, but I think a broader perspective and appreciation would actually make you a better warrior not a lesser one.
     
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  11. Shaderon

    Shaderon Master of Arts

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    I am starting to build my own MA company in order to make a living from it and most people consider me dedicated, even overly so but I don't practice 5 hours a day, in fact I practice at most 2 hours a day mostly 1.

    I train 5 days a week, I have Friday and Sunday off as my body needs to rest and 3 hours of differnt days I do my training, once a month I do instructor training and then I teach for 5 hours split between 5 different days.

    Does that make me not dedicated?

    I work part time and I'm a single mum, I don't have to time to do any more! In fact I don't have much time to come on here and post i'm that busy.

    Just because you don't train in every single minute you have spare does not mean that you are not dedicated... please don't make that mistake. dedication means that you will never give up and you will make your chosed path work, it doesn't not mean that you are willing to kill yourself with hard physical labour and give up time that you need to do other things in.

    And please don't tell us how to make time to do things, I get enough of that at work! I live to LIVE, to enjoy my life, not to "get things done". If putting something off until after I've had a sit down and shared a TV program with my daughter after school means it takes a bit longer then so be it!

    BTW I do my patterns in my head most of the time, just not physically.
     
  12. bekkilyn

    bekkilyn Yellow Belt

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    The couch (physically) got in the way of my practice/workouts. So...I just got rid of the couch. :)
     
  13. still learning

    still learning Senior Master

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    Hello, Everyone life has priorties.....each of us must choose the most important ones' first...

    Family first, work second (supports the family), then third can be any thing or even your own MA training...!

    When you don't want to train? ....one must find its priorties...

    Aloha,

    PS: Drop out rates is very high in most MA Classes...this is the norm!
     
  14. sfs982000

    sfs982000 Master Black Belt

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    I think plateauing is only natural not just in martial arts, but in any physical activity that you do and from personal experience I find that the hardest part for me is getting my fat butt out the door to class. Once I'm there then I seem to do fine and as a matter of fact I've actually had some of my best training sessions on days that really didn't feel like going. If it got to the point with me where that didn't work then I've actually taken time off to recharge my batteries. Good luck to you and I hope that it's just a phase and you continue in your training.
     
  15. still learning

    still learning Senior Master

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    Hello, This book gave us a great motivation to continue in those times of wanting to stop training.

    "Living the Martial Art Way" ..you may want to read it!

    Aloha,
     
  16. kingkong89

    kingkong89 Green Belt

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    I know how you feel all of us in martial arts have felt that way at least once, one suggestion is mage it interesting and fun to you keep up the mind tricking tell urself itll be fun i teach at a small dojo and ive done the basics for over 13 years and i still enjoy them because i tell myself they will help me get better true they will but like anyone else if i didnt keep that in the back of my mind then they would be boring
     
  17. wolfeyes2323

    wolfeyes2323 Orange Belt

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    Greetings &#8211;
    &#8220;Again, you train and make a living through your martial arts&#8221;

    I work a day job so I can teach and practice without thought about the finances .

    &#8220;In my opinion, living as a warrior is fine, but a warrior must also
    appreciate what he/she is protecting and living for.
    If you don't appreciate life, if you only train...then your path is hollow&#8221;

    I have learned to appreciate every moment of my life,
    each cup of coffee, each kiss, each day dawning,
    each breath. Every time we do anything , it may be our last.

    The depth of the pool does not matter, its clarity does .

    Romney^..^
     
  18. FierySquidFace

    FierySquidFace Green Belt

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    I really don't think of it as a choice. I've made a comitment to my body, and my mind to be dedicated and strong, and I refuse to let myself down. The same aproach has been helping me quit smoking.123
     

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