What was Kano´s will?

Discussion in 'Jujutsu / Judo' started by Humble artist, Aug 31, 2002.

  1. i see this kind of discussion has been had here a bit.
    What I´m thinking is,what did Jigoro Kano want judo to be when he created it? Many view it as a martial sport,then some still talk about traditional judo as a real one,or something.
    Besides what judo has grown into today...
    Is it what Kano meant it to be? I can´t say that I would know much about the art but it seems some people have given those silent whispers to the direction of "Well that may not be what Kano thought..." get the point?
    :idunno: :)
     
  2. tmanifold

    tmanifold Guest

    I know Kano did not like the over emphasis one sport and randori over kata and the philosophical issues. Yet he was a big pusher to get judo in the olympics. I think he would be pleased overall but would have issue with a few things.

    Tony
     
  3. jeffbeish

    jeffbeish Blue Belt

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    There are some references to Jigoro Kano's not so willing to allow Judo in the Olympics. Both sides can be found in the literature, so who knows what the truth is.
     
  4. arnisador

    arnisador Sr. Grandmaster

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    I came across a biography of him in Borders recently but I'm so backed up with reading, work and pleasure, that I haven't time to read it.
     
  5. jeffbeish

    jeffbeish Blue Belt

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    I found a couple items on Internet that describes Kano's attitude towards Olympic Judo, they are a little confusing and in a way contradictory:

    What the Olympics Will Bring to Karate: The Transformation of Karate-Do
    by Kiyoshi Yamazak

    "Soon after the revival of the Modern Olympic Games in 1896, Baron Pierre de Coubertin extended his invitation to Japan. The Japanese government chose Dr. Jigoro Kano, best known as the founder of judo, to represent the country. Dr. Kano, a life-long educator and university president as well as renowned martial artist, became the first Japanese representative to the IOC in 1909; he also participated in the 5th Olympics held in Stockholm, Sweden in 1912 as the head of the first-ever Japanese delegation. This was 10 years prior to the famous demonstration of karate by Gichin Funakoshi and Shinkin Gima that took place at Dr. Kano’s Kodokan Dojo in 1922.

    Dr. Kano became the Baron Pierre de Coubertin of Japan. He founded the Japan Athletic Union, which still governs all sports in Japan to this day, and dedicated his life to promoting sports and physical education among Japanese youth. Judo, which he created, was without doubt a combination of the traditional Japanese martial art of jujitsu and the ideal of Olympism outlined by Coubertin. It was Dr. Kano’s effort to support the Olympic movement as a proud citizen of Japan in response to Coubertin’s call for support: 'Every act of support for the Olympic movement promotes peace, friendship and solidarity throughout the world.'

    When Dr. Kano invited Funakoshi from Okinawa and encouraged him to teach karate in Tokyo, Dr. Kano envisioned a universal sport that could be practiced by the youth of the world. The transformation of karate-jitsu to karate-do signified karate’s acceptance as a sport, rather than as a tool of war. Funakoshi’s dojo kun (motto) includes 'Seek perfection of character!' This philosophy actually originated in ancient Greece and was handed down to him by Dr. Kano, a life-long mentor to Funakoshi and a friend of Baron Pierre de Coubertin."


    In another article:

    In Defence of Mediocrity, Editorial
    by John N. Edwards from Dragon Times #14

    "The inclusion of a remnant of its martial past as an Olympic sport, and one at which it could easily prevail, was viewed as a way of restoring national pride and saving the nation¹s face, a concept more important to the Japanese than any foreigner can comprehend. Before Japan could begin its economic miracle the people had to be able to raise their heads in pride. Jigoro Kano, the father of Judo, had been a giant of the pre-war Olympic movement so it all seemed so appropriate. Japan would be returned to the family of nations, make its mark on the Olympic movement, and, if all went as planned, win a great patriotic victory. Ironically Kano, who embraced Baron Pierre de Coubertin's vision of an Olympic games for the modern world, just as fervently declared his opposition to judo becoming a part of it. According to his assistant Minoro Mochizuki, when the founder of the modern Olympics suggested that Judo be included, Kano told him that, "it was impossible as judo was not a sport." Judo in the fifties was at its pinnacle. Since its introduction into Europe and America at the turn of the 20th century it had been adopted by police forces and military organizations as an effective but safe form of self defence/restraint. Japanese experts such as S. Uenishi and Yukio Tani had travelled Europe giving demonstration and challenging, successfully, some of the best known boxers and wrestlers of the day, despite the latter¹s huge weight and height advantages. They built a reputation for judo that was well-nigh unassailable. Kano's judo and a number of the jujutsu schools upon which it was based, became part of the fabric of European and American society, institutions in fact, activities that were considered wholesome, useful, and probably more importantly at that time, respectable. Indeed, one dojo in London's exclusive West End boasted an instructor for ladies, a Miss Robinson, who from her photo we can see taught in a stylish but very modest combination of judo jacket and bloomers."
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    I have no idea how reliable this Dragon Times is, but some of the articles are interesting.
     
  6. Thanks everyone.
    :asian:
     

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