What is your first response to pain (physical)?

Discussion in 'Beginners Corner' started by Supra Vijai, Nov 3, 2010.

  1. Supra Vijai

    Supra Vijai Black Belt

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    Hi everyone. We all accept that if we ever end up in a real confrontation (fight/situation), odds are pretty good that the longer you are in it, the better the chances are that you're going to get hit/kicked/taken down/cut etc. In class, we discuss what the effects are going to be, such as the adrenaline and it's effects, and the psychology of getting hit, but in the dojo it's always with a degree of safety. When hard punches are thrown, you typically know beforehand, and you're wearing protective gear or stable and guarding correctly. So my question is, how do you realistically think you'd react to getting hit hard, hard enough to cause pain? I've experienced it once or twice, and found that my immediate reaction was to respond in kind whereas a friend of mine's first response is to freeze and burst out laughing (yes she's a little weird :)), so I was just wondering what everyone else's experiences were, or their thoughts as to how they think they would react.

    I find my response tends to change depending on the situation though, in the dojo or with training partners, my brain becomes analytical and I try pinpoint where it hurts and why so I know how the technique is meant to feel, where the targets are etc, with friends and family etc my response is to take it as a joke and playfight back, in any other circumstances though, there is a split second delay while I process what's happened and the cause and then I react hard and fast (not always skilled though). Does this seem fairly normal to everyone?

    If anyone can suggest any drills or training methods to better prepare for this, that'd be great too. Thanks!
     
  2. altc

    altc White Belt

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    Hi there Supra.

    I have actually previously done some research on this matter, particularly as it comes to getting stabbed with a knife. Believe it or not, many people get stabbed with a knife and do not even feel it until after when they notice blood on themselves. One particular person even had a knife sticking out of her back and did not realise until she got home!!!

    In a real situation, the human body is under the effects of adrenaline. This is what contributes to things such as slow motion time and tunnel vision. What also happens under this stress is the body pulls the blood away from its extremities to limit bleeding. The side effect of this is that it limits fine motor control. That is partly why only gross motor skills work under pressure.

    It is partly due to this pulling of the blood away from the extremities to limit bleeding that contributes to the body feeling very little pain during a real encounter. The pain recepters sending messages to the brain are also ignored as that function does not contribute to surviving the situation.

    This ignoring of some functions and enhancement of others also contributes to some combat veterans making messes in their pants. This happened regularly during WW1 and WW11 studiess have found, particularly Grossman has been presenting these findings.

    The link to my article I did that pain is not felt even from knife attacks can be found below as well if you are interested,
    http://www.lowtechcombat.com/2010/02/can-you-be-stabbed-with-knife-and-not.html

    Hope all that helps.
     
  3. oaktree

    oaktree Master of Arts

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    Real simple accept it and hit him harder.
     
  4. Supra Vijai

    Supra Vijai Black Belt

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    lol not quite what I was asking but thanks :p
     
  5. oaktree

    oaktree Master of Arts

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    :shrug:
     
  6. Chris Parker

    Chris Parker Grandmaster

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    Hi Supra,

    I'd simply echo what altc has already said, you'll find that what he says there is also what you hear in class. I'd also agree with Oaktree as well, after all you asked what peoples primary response to "physical" pain is, and his is to hit harder. That's genuinely a very good mindset to have, bearing in mind that the effects of adrenaline means you won't necessarily experience things as "pain" in an encounter, having an attitude of "whatever they do, I come back harder" is a very good mindset for you to explore.

    Essentially, it comes down to not getting flustered by being hit, and not letting yourself get "shut down" by it, which happens to many martial artists who are not used to contact. I'd go back and think again about exactly what he was saying....
     
  7. Bruno@MT

    Bruno@MT Senior Master

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    I have some idea, but I have no real life real-fight experience, just so you know.

    During our first public demo, I was filled with adrenalin. At one point my arm nearly got pulled form the shoulder socket. Both arms actually, but the right even worse than the left. When it happened I knew it was not good but I just kept on going. At that point I didn't feel any pain at all.

    I stayed charged with adrenalin right until after the very last part of the demo. I even carried tatami from the demo area. And then I started to unwind and man oh man did my arms hurt. My triceps on both arms were damaged, and when I tried changing out of my keikogi, I discovered that I could not lift my arms above waist height, not with all the will in the world. I could not lift my t-shirt over my head and had to ask someone to help me with that. After getting my arm in a sling, I drove home in 3d gear because I did not want to change gears at all. I spent the couple of hours after that just sitting in the sofa with ice on my arms.

    Sometime later I saw the video footage of that demo, and the expression on the faces of the crowd told me the same thing that I felt afterwards. I also saw myself getting piled into the tatami full force with ganseki nage, and I didn't feel a thing then.

    So imo it is perfectly possible to get through the fight and ignoring pain that would have you incapacitated in normal circumstances.
     
  8. Rayban

    Rayban Green Belt

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    Hi all,

    Post number one. Go me!

    Its funny how adrenalin works with the body, but also what it does to the mind. To train the body to cope with adrenalin I've found fairly straight forward (calmed down and pumping up). But training the mind to cope with the stresses of whatever the situation is a bit more difficult.

    One aspect of this that I have recently been able to get a grasp of under adrenalin is using my peripheral vision, which I try to use as often as I can.

    But following on from Oaktree and Chris' comments, a "fighting philosophy" is needed to keep the mind on track. Focussing is not an issue in a fight, it's what adrenalin does. The issue is trying to not let that focus become tunnel vision because of your emotional state.

    My philosophy on this way back in the day was "Fight until you cannot physically move anymore" which relies on the effects of adrenalin.
    As was said earlier, you are numb to pain, can move faster and are stronger, meaning you can hold your own in a fight longer so long as it's maintained (or you aren't killed).

    After training and a fair bit of growing up I've learned that this philosophy, though poetic and romantic, only really applies in certain situations. But thatÂ’s just me speaking from my own experiences.
     
  9. Supra Vijai

    Supra Vijai Black Belt

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    I wasn't trying to dismiss or detract from Oaktree's comment in the slightest. I understand the mentality well, as I said in my topic starter, my first response is often to turn and strike back (usually with a soku yaku from experience). My apologies to Oaktree if that was the impression given as well. I guess I was a little ambiguous in my original phrazing of the question. What I guess I am really asking is if people have a set response to pain in every situation (violent or otherwise) or whether the situation dictates the response.

    Bruno, that's really quite interesting that not only did you not feel anything during the technique, but it lasted until after you had carried the tatami away and started to unwind! I would have thought you would have been unwinding a lot earlier than that myself but then I have never been in a demonstration or similar situation. Just checking though, did you feel anything or did your concious mind shut down to all levels of pain?

    Rayban, how were you the first post if you referenced the others? :| Thanks for your comment though! That's an interesting take on focus and adrenaline. Just checking something though, what do you mean by " Focussing is not an issue in a fight, it's what adrenalin does"? Isn't adrenaline meant to be as debilitating as it is useful in terms of making you stronger, faster, hit harder?
     
  10. Supra Vijai

    Supra Vijai Black Belt

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    wait... never mind, you meant it was your first post! Duh!
     
  11. Sifu Chambers

    Sifu Chambers Yellow Belt

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    In martial arts we train for self defense, which also means we train to hit back if needed. However, it is equaly important to train your body to take punches or kicks. In Kajukenbo we train for this through Kiya drills or what I like to call contact conditioning drills. It is true that when someone gets hit that is not used to it, then most people will find the pain to have a shocking effect. So if you practice contact conditioning then your body will be coditioned to take a punch or kick. It is also important to work your way up to stronger conditioning. Start off with light contact and work your body to take more contact as you progress. It is also important to insure safety through knowing where to apply ontact conditioning to areas such as the abdomen, forearms and thighs. You do not want to hit ribs, sternum or other vital areas. Another good aspect of Kajukenbo is that when we train in our defensive drills we allow a little contact. Again, not to vital areas, but to areas that allow the student to develope body conditioning without injury. It is Kajukenbo's philosophy to train in the dojo as real as possible to insure that all aspects of self defense is covered for the street, to include getting hit. I hope this helps. Sifu CC
     
  12. Master Dan

    Master Dan Master Black Belt

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    I would also like to bring up the issue of people taking contact to areas on the meridians and conception points even in protected sparing or self defense manipulation that people should understand that different areas are more severe in effect on the person being hit based on the time of day or how the body cycles on a 12 hour basis different for each area.

    Now some people say this is phooey well today a very good international study was published and people in France are having thier Chemo Theropy adminstered based on thier time cycle of 4am and 4 pm. The results are outstanding with 5 times the number of healthy cells not being killed and twice the number of Cancer cells being killed while at the same time the effects from the theropy on the person is dramatically reduced. So if healing is accomplished by the cycles of energy the reverse is also true for the destructive cycle.

    I believe in contact conditioning especially for people to be able to deal with stress related to adrenalin dump in self defense but it does make one consider as a teacher depending on whats planned what are the effects possible a few hours later or even long term related to whats being taught at that particular moment?
     
  13. Sifu Chambers

    Sifu Chambers Yellow Belt

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    So what you are saying is that it is best to conduct contact conditioning durring certain times of the day?
     
  14. Supra Vijai

    Supra Vijai Black Belt

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    This is really interesting. How would one go about finding out their particular body clock/energy cycle?
     
  15. Chris Parker

    Chris Parker Grandmaster

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    The concept of biorythms is pretty well established. The most well known form is the female monthly cycle, but that is just one of many. Other cycles are very common, but so common that they aren't "noticed", such as sleep cycles. Interestingly enough, it was found in a few studies that without external stimulus, people tend to naturally fall into a 25 hour cycle, rather than the expected 24 hour one.

    Guys have their own as well, and some theories have cycles within hours, a day, a week, a month, six weeks, and so on. I actually did a little study involving this when studying statistics years ago...
     
  16. Supra Vijai

    Supra Vijai Black Belt

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    Yeah I was aware of circadian rythms - mostly in terms of sleep cycles and how they are affected by zeitgebers such as daylight but not in the context of body conditioning training. Where would I find more information on the particular effects that could be had on different parts of the body at different times?
     
  17. Chris Parker

    Chris Parker Grandmaster

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    Look to Traditional Chinese Medicine sources, it's a big part of that. Remember, even we recommend doing things like hand conditioning at the same time each day, preferably either early in the morning or late at night (not in the middle of the day).
     
  18. Supra Vijai

    Supra Vijai Black Belt

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    Will do with the Chinese medicine reading! I've haven't actually taken up any body conditioning programs as yet so I'm afraid that's a bit of info I didn't have before. I do suppose it's the same principle as going to the gym at the same time each time and the like. Purely out of luck/thanks to my work schedule any training I do with regards to martial arts happens to fall in the same sort of time frame as that of a class so it's not something I've paid conscious attention to in terms of effects from training at different times.

    Thanks for that! Something new for me to get into and try expand my knowledge :)
     
  19. Sifu Chambers

    Sifu Chambers Yellow Belt

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    Not trying to attack or be disrespectful..but should we not train for contact conditioning at all hours? I mean we train in the dojo as it might happen on the street. We will not be able to tell our attacker "Wait, do'nt attack me, come back at 4PM and we can try this again." Please help me to understand the logic. With humble respect. Sifu CC
     
  20. Supra Vijai

    Supra Vijai Black Belt

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    Sifu, I'm taking a guess here as I haven't had the chance to read up on the subject in great amounts of detail yet but it may be a case of some times of the day are better to train than others as you are more receptive to certain stimulus. In a street situation yes you can't "schedule" your attacker to come back at a certain time but hopefully by then you're body will be conditioned enough to handle it.

    I may be completely incorrect with this guess so please don't hold me to it.123
     

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