Want to be a sensei, learning to fast or not fast enough ?

Discussion in 'General Martial Arts Talk' started by Denoaikido, Dec 16, 2018.

  1. Denoaikido

    Denoaikido Orange Belt

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2018
    Messages:
    64
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    8
    I am at that stage where I'm trying to learn every art I possibly can that is close by me that I like . A big part for me is the curriculum and of coarse the teacher.For instance is he cocky or humble & is he a real sensei.
    Much goes into my mind thinking about this I also have to get a feel for the class and see if it right for me.What would you guys suggest I already do aikido and and bujinkan plan doing Wobkan JJ but not sure if its the right kind of JJ im looking for more ground based JJ.I plan to teach budo one day and mix in many arts that are what i feel are usable in anywhere but this is a long road and path one i have been on my whole life and almost 40 now ive done many arts but mastered none I really like aikido ,bujinkan and competed in kick boxing and a few kinds of grappling arts.
    Its been a long road and might be a even longer one coming.
     
  2. kempodisciple

    kempodisciple MT Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,692
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    New York
    I'm a bit confused by this post. Is your question whether or not you have the experience to be a sensei, or if you should focus on something new, or what type of jujitsu you should practice? You seem to be bouncing from idea to idea.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. Denoaikido

    Denoaikido Orange Belt

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2018
    Messages:
    64
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    8
    I guess when you mix arts for many years it comes a time to master one so you can be a official sensei wish id thought more towards teaching then competing!
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2018
  4. Hanzou

    Hanzou Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2013
    Messages:
    5,081
    Likes Received:
    733
    Trophy Points:
    263
    WTF is Wobkan JJ?

    Find yourself a Brazilian JJ school and you'll be just fine.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Funny Funny x 1
  5. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    21,923
    Likes Received:
    6,426
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Hendersonville, NC
    What do you mean by “official sensei”? Build the experience and expertise to teach something. Figure out what it is you want to pass along, and make that your specialty. You don’t have to - and can’t - know everything.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. kitkatninja

    kitkatninja Blue Belt

    Joined:
    May 7, 2012
    Messages:
    233
    Likes Received:
    45
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    UK
    Just one question, why don't you try to concentrate on one? Instead of jumping around between the different arts... I'm not saying don't cross train, but make sure that you understand the basics of the art(s) you're studying, including compression/decompression, expansion/contraction, making sure that you understand the little bits in the art that reduces injuries (eg proper foot placement, etc) before you rush to become a teacher - after all what is the rush anyway?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. skribs

    skribs Senior Master

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2013
    Messages:
    3,682
    Likes Received:
    924
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Lakewood, WA
    If this post is indicative of your training style, what you need is focus. At my school, we teach 2 martial arts, Taekwondo and Hapkido. Even though we advertise the Hapkido to the adults, most people wait until they get their black belt in Taekwondo before even starting Hapkido. Or they'll take both, but treat Hapkido more like an elective.

    Personally, I've made it my goal to move through the belts in Taekwondo as quickly as humanly possible. In Hapkido I'm taking it much slower. I started them both around the same time (ended up taking a break in the middle to focus on TKD). In that time I've gotten my 3rd degree black belt in TKD and my green belt in HKD.

    I would do the same. Pick an art that's going to be your primary and focus on that. If you want, also pick up a secondary, but don't let it get in the way of your primary. And when you have the time and opportunity, such as when your primary art is on break, or if there's a seminar you can attend, in that case learn something another art has to offer.

    But if you just bounce around and absorb the basics of each art, you're going to miss a lot of the strategies and concepts that they teach you once you've mastered the basics and foundations.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  8. Denoaikido

    Denoaikido Orange Belt

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2018
    Messages:
    64
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Great replies everyone really and they are helpful.One thing I will say is I've found a real over all love for aikido but I am aware imho it lacks some things bujinkan honestly fills in most them gaps minus the ground game and is similar for me to aikido that I'm practicing now . I competed in kick boxing at a high level also blessed to do more then one competition in grappling but none these things I mastered in or reached and kind of dan, shodan or belts it was all at first to get into to the main stream of Mma well many health problems,so that dream got terribly rendered.
    Personally that for me and took many years to get back to even go to martial arts period It's now my ultimate goal to teach what I consider budo threw aikido and bujinkan and maybe some from of more advanced grappling but im gonna take the next 5 years or so getting the credentials and furthering my knowledge to become a teacher worthy enough.
     
  9. kempodisciple

    kempodisciple MT Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,692
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    New York
    I'm still not entirely sure what your question is, but it sounds like you answered it. I will add in that one of the steps to becoming a great teacher is to first be a (likely mediocre) teacher.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  10. skribs

    skribs Senior Master

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2013
    Messages:
    3,682
    Likes Received:
    924
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Lakewood, WA
    I'm positive several kids quit at my school when I first started teaching.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. Denoaikido

    Denoaikido Orange Belt

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2018
    Messages:
    64
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    8
    My main question is just what do you guys think it takes to be a valid sensei in budo not many do it here in the states but in japan some get Dr degrees even. I am sorry it went into my own agendas and experiences thanks for the humble guidance anyhow ! Thats not really how I wanted to bring it up it was just easier.
     
  12. skribs

    skribs Senior Master

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2013
    Messages:
    3,682
    Likes Received:
    924
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Lakewood, WA
    Step 1: Learn Judo
    Step 2: Learn to teach Judo
    Step 3: Teach Judo

    Step 2 is the hardest part.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. Yokozuna514

    Yokozuna514 Purple Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2018
    Messages:
    375
    Likes Received:
    220
    Trophy Points:
    198
    The question on the surface seems simple enough but the answers can be quite varied as there is no global regulation in MA. You can have teachers that have a high certification to teach the art but are not comfortable teaching certain age groups. Conversely, you can have teachers with little or no certification but are outstanding teachers. There are some systems or organizations that over inflate their belt structure while there are those that have a slower progression.

    If you ask me personally what I think it takes to be a valid Sensei, I would have a hard time keeping my answer down to a few sentences. Sensei means the 'one that has come before' so in other words they are a guide. Like in all things, you have some guides that are very knowledgeable and others that are not. There seems to be a Sensei for all types of people out there so I do not think this question can be answered easily but good luck in your quest to find it.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  14. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    21,923
    Likes Received:
    6,426
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Hendersonville, NC
    Have something to teach that’s worth learning, and enough ability (at the thing and at teaching) to deliver it at high value.

    Everything else is just trying to get to that.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  15. skribs

    skribs Senior Master

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2013
    Messages:
    3,682
    Likes Received:
    924
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Lakewood, WA
    I'd add the third thing - beyond just having something worth learning and enough knowledge in that something - is being able to teach. I've seen some talented people that are horrible teachers. A lot of people either forget what it was like to be a beginner, or have a hard time putting themselves in the shoes of someone who isn't learning as fast as they did. Others don't have the speaking skills or presence to keep a class engaged.

    What you said are definitely important. But teaching is its own skill.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  16. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    21,923
    Likes Received:
    6,426
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Hendersonville, NC
    Thus the “at the thing and at teaching” parenthetical phrase.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  17. skribs

    skribs Senior Master

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2013
    Messages:
    3,682
    Likes Received:
    924
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Lakewood, WA
    What? You actually expect me to read what you say before I reply? :p
     
    • Funny Funny x 2

Share This Page