Take down your opponent during his weight shifting

Discussion in 'General Martial Arts Talk' started by Kung Fu Wang, Apr 16, 2018.

  1. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    If you can force your opponent to shift weight from one leg to another, when his weight is on one leg, if you trip/sweep/hook that leg, he will fall.

    Here is one example. You hook your opponent's left leg, when he lifts up that leg, you scoop his right leg while it has 100% of his weight.

    If you apply this strategy, you can create many combo to achieve that goal. What's your opinion on this strategy?


     
  2. wab25

    wab25 Black Belt

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    The guy taking the fall needs to learn how to fall without hitting his head...

    I think Judo teaches a combo like that: o uchi gari and ko uchi gari. Start with either, then switch back and forth. I have seen other variations, where they switch to uchi mata from ko uchi gari (that one is actually quite fun).
     
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  3. Prostar

    Prostar Orange Belt

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    I have always said that if you know where your opponent will be next, you got him. Doesn't matter if it is a sweep or another technique.
     
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  4. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    IMO, a lot of "aiki" training is about getting a feel for weight shifts and weight commitment, so it can be recognized early and used. It's a different version of what you're talking about here, as most aiki techniques (or aiki application of technique) require this in a more absolute fashion. Judo uses some of the same, but with less reliance on finesse (for one thing, they're okay with inducing the step rather than waiting for one).

    In short, I agree - this exists in different ways in a lot of arts, and is a major principle for grappling. Failure to apply this principle accounts for a lot of the failures of relatively new students to be able to execute technique.
     
  5. TaiChiTJ

    TaiChiTJ Brown Belt

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    It is an excellent strategy, worth practicing.
     
  6. lansao

    lansao Purple Belt

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    If you bop’m just right while he’s regaining balance you’ll knock him to the ground with little effort.
     
  7. Ryan_

    Ryan_ Green Belt

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    Video is unavailable. Definitely a good strategy described though. Also if they're kicking you, they'll have their weight on one leg, and you may be able to force them to fall by moving out the way and shifting their leg further than they intended. (I did this before in real situation, person did fall)
     
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  8. lansao

    lansao Purple Belt

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    Gum Sao?
     
  9. Ryan_

    Ryan_ Green Belt

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    I've only studied Choi Kwang Do/Kong Soo Do and Bujinkan Ninjutsu, but the reason I did that was purely instinct in the moment.
     
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