Tae-Kwon-Do

Discussion in 'Tae-Kwon-Do' started by Bob Hubbard, Aug 12, 2001.

  1. ajury

    ajury White Belt

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    That is a good question. I am 46 and currently a 1st dan. The Grandmaster for our school still practices and teaches and he is in his late 70's.

    We have a few students that have started in their 60's. There are a few things they cannot do but they have fun and work hard at what they can, its great to see.

    Of course we are a traditional non contact school so that may be part of the difference.

    Be well, do your best! Meet great people and have fun.

    Personally when I cant do it anymore I will probably go back to Tai Chi, I studied for 3 years and really enjoyed it.
     
  2. Napitenkah

    Napitenkah Orange Belt

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    I have heard more than one person say that with conditioning, if you don't do it consistently you lose it. The calcium gets redistributed back to the places its usually needed.
    For me, that has not been the case.
    If I start a conditioning and get it going for awhile, then not do it for awhile, if I come back, I often find that the level I was at last, has either stayed the same or sometimes is better.
    Like I saw a way to condition was to hit the black part of the Bob doll with the legs.
    It is a nice balance of soft and hardness.
    The first time I did it, I just barely kicked it, and I hurt my leg, to where I had to wait a week before starting it again.
    Then I gradually would do multiple low roundhouse kicks on each leg.
    Not hard, real light, after hitting a long Muay Thai type bag.
    I was doing that off and on for a few eeks, then I didn't do anything for over a month.
    I didn't know what would happen when I got back to it, but I actually found I could hit it a little bit harder then the last time I did it.
    I seem to condition quick, and it stays. I'm 46.
    Even when I started kicking the Muay Thai bag, my legs could feel it, but now I can kick it much harder. The same with hand strikes on BOB. I don't use gloves, even though I have them. So at first I would feel it, and my wrists would sometimes crank. Now I can hit harder and longer, even if I don't go for several weeks.
     
  3. Eastpointvet

    Eastpointvet Yellow Belt

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    Why are the hands typically low? Why don't most competitors use punching as much? It seems to be avoided at all cost in favor of kicks. Is that just for scoring?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  4. Dirty Dog

    Dirty Dog MT Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    WTF Olympic rules sparring disallows punches to the head and thus encourages the low hands approach. Not all TKD orgs or schools spar under this ruleset, of course. It's merely the one that gets the most coverage simply because it IS the Olympic model. Many people would like to see the rules changed, but they are what they are. At least for now.
     
  5. Earl Weiss

    Earl Weiss Senior Master

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    Because when the SK government decided to take over TKD after 20 years, and reinvent it they needed ways to differentiate this new thing (New Patterns, new sparring rules) from what everyone else was doing. I don't know that the no head punching existed in any "TKD" circles before this time. If it did, it was certainly extremely limited.
     
  6. Laplace_demon

    Laplace_demon Black Belt

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    Strangely enough, the guard is almost the same (low) in ITF contests, even at the highest level.
     
  7. Spookey

    Spookey Purple Belt

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    Good Day Sir.

    I would encourage a few modifications, for instance the Ji Do Kwan is not really another kwan, but rather a name change under new leadership. Additionally, there was a split in Moo Duk Kwan, with some moving forward to become Soo Bahk Do, and others becoming Taekwondo Moo Duk Kwan.

    You have also received some very valid input from other parties (ie. USAT).

    Overall, it is a good summation!
     
  8. Spookey

    Spookey Purple Belt

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    Please review your information related to the original five kwans.

    Song Moo Kwan
    Chung Do Kwan
    Chang Moo Kwan
    Yun Moo Kwan
    Moo Duk Kwan

    The Yun Moo Kwan essentially became the Ji Do Kwan.

    Please advise of your findings.

    Additionally, I believe there was actually a rift within the Moo Duk Kwan, which lead to the creation of Moo Duk Kwan Taekwondo.

    The Moo Duk Kwan (TSD) now refers to their art as Soo Bahk Do if I'm not mistaken.
     
  9. Dirty Dog

    Dirty Dog MT Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Close, but no cigar.
    Tang Soo Do Moo Duk Kwan was a founding Kwan of the unification movement. The split occurred later, (when GM HWANG, Kee left the unification for reasons of politics and ego) and resulted in some (most of what I've found indicates about 1/3) of the Kwan leaving and re-founding TSD MDK.

    Again, close...

    Tang Soo Do MDK still exists as a viable art and (at least in my own experience) is more widespread than Soo Bahk Do MDK.
    This is, of course, the result of another of the many splits that have affected pretty much all organizations.
     
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  10. Spookey

    Spookey Purple Belt

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    Thanks for sharing, TSD is not my area of knowledge by a long shot. So MDK did split to some extent at least for a whilee correct? Did Moo Duk Kwan originally have representation within Kukkiwon (i.e. The second unification)?
     
  11. Dirty Dog

    Dirty Dog MT Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    The Kukkiwon didn't exist until 1973 - a couple of decades after the second unification. As far as the Kukkiwon is concerned, the kwan do not exist. The MDK was the largest kwan involved in the unification movement.
     
  12. Spookey

    Spookey Purple Belt

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    Can you help me better understand the "two unifications"... I consider the KTA (circa 1959) as the first unification and the Kukkiwon (72-73) as the second. Are you referring to the Korea Taesoo Do association of the early-mid 60's as the second unification?

    How can 1973 be "a couple decades" after the "second unification" when TKD is only 60 years old?

    You kind sir are losing me.
     
  13. Dirty Dog

    Dirty Dog MT Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    The first attempt at unification began prior to the Korean war in 1950, and collapsed during that war. The KTA was the result of the second unification movement. The Kukkiwon was founded by the KTA and didn't have anything to do with the unification movement. As far as the Kukkiwon is concerned, the Kwan are irrelevant.

    Sloppy math. Several decades after the first unification movement. 14 years (or close enough to 1.5 decades as makes no difference) after the second unification movement. Sorry about that.

    I'm sorry to hear that. You will catch up, I'm sure. ;)
     
  14. Spookey

    Spookey Purple Belt

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    The Kukkiwon was founded by order and demanded cooperation and unity at least in the Republic of Korea.
     
  15. Dirty Dog

    Dirty Dog MT Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Well, no, the Kukkiwon was founded by the KTA after they secured quite a lot of funding from both the government and the private sector.
    The South Korean government has endorsed the KTA, and as such the Kukkiwon flavor of TKD is by far the most common in South Korea, but I don't think it's illegal to teach non-Kukkiwon TKD. As I recall, the South Korean government now basically controls the Kukkiwon, but that is a relatively recent development.
    I don't know what you mean by "founded by order" to be honest.
     

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