Sparring gear - mouthpieces

Discussion in 'General Martial Arts Talk' started by AngryHobbit, Jan 27, 2018.

  1. AngryHobbit

    AngryHobbit Master of Arts

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    All! I have trouble using regular mouthpieces when sparring. Even the smaller, softer ones properly molded to my teeth are still too big and make me gag. My dentist says I have a "unique" anatomy (note to all - NEVER a good thing to hear from your dentist): my mouth is too small for a grownup and the mouth cavity narrows too steeply toward the back. This always causes issues when taking dental x-rays.

    So, any advice you could give me as to what mouthpieces I could use that would still protect my teeth when sparring but wouldn't cause me to feel like throwing up.
     
  2. hoshin1600

    hoshin1600 Senior Master

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    im sure you are aware that you can trim the length and that they have youth sizes. have you tried these options and what was the result?
     
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  3. WaterGal

    WaterGal Master Black Belt

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    If your mouth is very small/narrow, have you tried using a youth-size mouth guard?
     
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  4. AngryHobbit

    AngryHobbit Master of Arts

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    That's what we are considering. I wanted to check whether maybe there was some magical option for undersized adults. :)
     
  5. Midnight-shadow

    Midnight-shadow 3rd Black Belt

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    If you are sure that the gag reflex from the bigger mouth guards is not psychological then I would definitely try a child's mouth guard instead.
     
  6. CB Jones

    CB Jones Senior Master

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    Also, are you double boiling?

    We boil then fit....then we cut the ends off where they are flush with your last molar then boil and fit again. Make sure you are sucking in thru your teeth as you fit both times.

    When it fits properly the mouthpiece should stay on your teeth even while talking and you should have to use you fingers or tongue remove it.
     
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  7. JR 137

    JR 137 Senior Master

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    Perhaps a stupid question... did you ask your dentist what he/she recommends?

    I have issues with boil and bite mouth guards too. They’re not long enough to protect my back molar. I didn’t think much of it until I got a hook kick in the jaw a few months ago. When I got hit, I felt my back teeth grind together. Not a good feeling. Had she not pulled her kick, it would’ve been a lot worse.

    My dentist custom fitted me for a mouth guard. It cost $100. Not outrageous, but not cheap either. After wearing it the first time, I’ll never go back to a boil and bite one. It fits like a vacuum. I literally have to pull it off (in a good way). I can open my mouth and breathe without it going anywhere. And it covers all my teeth.
     
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  8. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    The problem here is you not blocking lol.


    Some times this is the only option. It would be my first choice if I had the cash to spend that much on a mouth piece but would be acceptable in the event that there was no other alternative.
     
  9. AngryHobbit

    AngryHobbit Master of Arts

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    I did. Double-boil, then fit, trimmed off the tips - the works. But it still feels like... there is too much of it.
     
  10. AngryHobbit

    AngryHobbit Master of Arts

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    :) @gpseymour wears one too - and he blocks A LOT better than I do.
     
  11. AngryHobbit

    AngryHobbit Master of Arts

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    Hmmm... I didn't even know you could do that. I'll be at my dentist's just this coming Wednesday to get my new tooth finally - I'll ask him.

    It's one of those cases, where services offered by American healthcare providers are so drastically different and more extensive than what I grew up with, I am still learning about everything you can ask them. :)
     
  12. JR 137

    JR 137 Senior Master

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    I did block. With my head :)

    And, there’s not much alternative. My dentist rattled off several good over the counter names. But if the shock doctor one’s not long enough, it’s going to be hard to find one that is. I figured if it takes me buying 3 or 4 different ones to get the right fit (at $30 a piece), $100 is probably cheaper. And I’m done with it.

    The manufacturer offers cheaper and more expensive ones, but I the one I got struck the right balance. It was upper-middle end. His nephew is an amateur MMA fighter, and he got one a step or two above what I got.

    I look at the justification of the cost 2 ways - 1. A Shock Doctor or the like costs about $35, and a replacement one from my dentist will probably run about $50* and 2. $100 is a lot cheaper than potentially needing dental work.

    *I think the biggest cost of the thing is the dentist taking time out to have me bite the tray, and the manufacturer making the mold from it. They sent me the mold of my teeth. I think when it’s replacement time I send the mold to them and they make a new mouthpiece. And so long as I don’t lose the mouthpiece, I’m pretty sure it’ll last several years. It seems very durable.

    Edit: Just to add...
    I wasn’t thrilled about spending $100 on a mouthpiece. I mean, come on... it’s a mouthpiece. Once I tried it on, the price didn’t bother me at all. It just feels right. Kind of hard to explain. It was one of those times that I thought “why didn’t I do this sooner?” I’d absolutely hate to wear a regular one again if I had to; it’s that comfortable. But yeah, $100 ain’t cheap.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2018
  13. JR 137

    JR 137 Senior Master

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    I guess it wasn’t a stupid question. I bought the $100 dollar version. There’s cheaper ones and more expensive ones. I’m not sure how much cheaper, but I think the manufacturer my dentist uses starts around $70. It all depends on how much protection you need.

    Here’s a link to the manufacturer I used. There’s no prices, and the dentist may charge a bit more or less for their time. The $100 I paid was for everything. I bought the “heavy.”

    http://glidewelldental.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/patient-playsafe-brochure.pdf
     
  14. AngryHobbit

    AngryHobbit Master of Arts

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    This is not an entirely bad idea. I've had multiple concussions, so I know my head will hold up. ;-)
     
  15. marques

    marques Master Black Belt

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    I am at this stage, more or less. But I think from now we just get used to that, over time. If no better option... I don’t feel good when I put it in my mouth, but as soon as the sparring starts I forget about this issue.
     
  16. AngryHobbit

    AngryHobbit Master of Arts

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    I suppose I could also use it as a deterrent - if my opponents know if I am about to throw up because of my mouthpiece at any moment, they won't be able to get close to me. :)
     
  17. CB Jones

    CB Jones Senior Master

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    Feint the vomit...then the old 1-2 or however you like to attack....genius!
     
  18. AngryHobbit

    AngryHobbit Master of Arts

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    I am here to serve. <bats eyelashes and pokes at ground with toe modestly>
     
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