Permission to pause

Discussion in 'The Locker Room Bar & Grill' started by AngryHobbit, Mar 28, 2018.

  1. AngryHobbit

    AngryHobbit Senior Master

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    Hey, who am I to judge? I am part Russian - ergo, genetically long-winded in speaking and writing. :)

    Seriously, this is wonderful, and I appreciate your input. You are very brave, I think - first, because you pushed through what must have been very painful and very exhausting; and second, because you had the guts to stop and take stock.

    I have a rare, weird skeletal defect - my spine sits too high with respect to my pelvis. So... it's sort of like a wobbly flag pole or fence post. I have to constantly keep track of whether I am doing enough to exercise my core and abdominal muscles, because they have to do some of the job of keeping me upright that the spine is supposed to do but can't do. This defect is inoperable, so it's pretty much the life of exercise for the rest of my days for me. It's not a bad thing, but it requires a lot of checks and balances - how stiff am I going to be tomorrow if I don't stretch today? How wobbly am I today because I had no core exercises yesterday? And so on.
     
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  2. aedrasteia

    aedrasteia Purple Belt

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    Where are Dad, Uncles and Grandfathers? Still alive? Still in Ukraine? Where are Mother, Aunts, Grandmothers?

    w/respect A
     
  3. AngryHobbit

    AngryHobbit Senior Master

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    All my grandparents are gone, as are my uncles. My mom died when I was 14. My dad and my step-mom still reside in Ukraine. I asked if I need to get my a** into gear and bring them here, but they don't want to leave - they don't speak the language, don't think they can survive the transition, and don't want to be wholly dependent on me. I do support them now, but they have their own income too.
     
  4. _Simon_

    _Simon_ Senior Master

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    Thanks AH that's very kind of you :). Yeah has been honestly just hellish, but it's really truly taught me to just be kinder to myself, and listen to when I'm pushing things a bit much. And just how important relaxing is.

    Ah wow, yeah and you'd definitely be more in tune right there, that must be incredibly challenging for you. I guess it's a case of knowing yourself and knowing when too far is too far, and no one else will know that but can only speculate. That would take a lot of maintenance and intuitive awareness on your part for sure.

    It's a really interesting area that seems to be gaining in attention (the importance of recovery, not needing as much training volume as we think etc). Whilst breaking through preconceived limitations is important, sometimes it's just not necessary, and sometimes it's just totally 100% okay to take it a bit easier. For long term health, long term enjoyment, and I'd argue long term results in performance!
     
  5. gucia6

    gucia6 Yellow Belt

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    How do I know when to stop?
    I listen to my body. And as the physical issues are relatively easy to solve, the psychological are the ones I pay attention to most.

    Any time I feel tired (fatigued), have problems waking up, often wake up at night, angry for no reason, start snapping at people, have the feeling that my day suddenly got shorter and I cannot manage usual tasks, when I start thinking "what is the purpose of all of that?", my alarm lights start blinking.
    Thanks to 2 heavy experiences in my life, which one led to depression (fortunately happily ended without tragedy) and other led to uncontrolled panic attacks for most insignificant reasons, I learned to pay very close attention to all those little changes.

    And whenever my alert lights start to blink, I take a deep breath and stop. After all I have only one life, only one health, only one fantastic family. And I always have this internal conflict, because I would like to be tough, I would love to train more, but I know I am "fragile" and one step too far could take me to the "dark side" and I know it is not funny there.
    And when I stop I have a look at my diet , as this is very often associated with my psychological issues. Generally I eat healthy, but sometimes due to lack of time to prepare, laziness or whatever I grab something from my "forbidden" list. If that happens, the best solution for me is fasting. It absolutely clears and calms down my mind and body. After short period of fasting I adjust my food to daily cortisol/insulin cycle. Other than that, I sleep much more. After putting kids to bed around 8pm, I am going to sleep as well.
    Doing this "reset" every now and then puts me back on track.

    And for the physical issues I stop when I have unusual joint or muscle pain or stiffness. And I don't mean some sore muscles after training, but a pain and tightness that prevents me from moving, as if the muscles or joints got wrapped with tight strap to protect what is inside. Then I stop any exercises and relax, go to sauna, eat food that might help in the recovery, sleep.

    As for feeling "guilty" taking a break? I stopped that long time ago.
    After all I am not professional and I know that some break now an then improves my efficiency. And it does not matter if it is training, work or house activities. Just sometimes I have to be lazy, sit down and look at the beautiful landscape or setting sun ;)
     
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  6. AngryHobbit

    AngryHobbit Senior Master

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    I am still learning to do this. I grew up in a culture, where a lot of responsibility rested with EVERYONE, including children, not to whine about their problems, because everyone else's lives were already hard enough. So, it was very common for us, as kids, not to talk about feeling sick unless it was getting SERIOUS (like, tonsilitis serious or scarlet fever serious).

    Something so deep-rooted in one's psyche is VERY hard to recondition. But I am working on it. Promise.
     
  7. _Simon_

    _Simon_ Senior Master

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    A beautiful post, thanks so much for sharing, got alot out of that :)123
     

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