Osoto-gari

Discussion in 'Jujutsu / Judo' started by tshadowchaser, Dec 13, 2005.

  1. tshadowchaser

    tshadowchaser Sr. Grandmaster

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    lets start a disscussion on this throw
    First we need an explanation (for those that don't know) next how do you set it up. Its good features and bad, etc.
     
  2. bignick

    bignick Senior Master

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    Finally, some life in the Judo/Jujutsu section

    Ok, an Osoto Gari is the standard big outer reap, what some people will call a sweep. In judo, the difference between a reap and a sweep is that there is no weight on the foot that you sweep, and there is on the one you reap. The "classic" Osoto Gari is where you will break your opponents balance to their back right corner, shifting the majority of their weight onto their right heel. This can be done using a left foot forward tsugi ashi in conjunction with the hands, grabbing the lapel and sleeve or arm and neck, to shift uke's weight. Once you've got their balance broken your left foot should be about the same depth as their right, the one you are going to reap. From there bring your right leg up past their right leg and sweep back, making thigh to thigh contact, and remember to follow through. Don't stop when you feel contact, continue with the reap, which will bend your upper body slightly forward, and if you move your hands with your body, will cause uke to shift their weight even more to that corner, which really augments the power of the throw.

    The problem with the "classic" O Soto Gari, is everybody can see it coming from a mile away and hold you out or shift their leg to regain their balance....
     
  3. Makalakumu

    Makalakumu Gonzo Karate Apocalypse

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    However, if they "give" you the leg in the clinch, that is a different story. One can move in for this throw very quickly.
     
  4. bignick

    bignick Senior Master

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    Exactly, my favorite counter to an O Soto Gari is another O Soto Gari, if you appear to leave the leg open for attack, most people will simply move in for the reap and not bother with the kuzushi, or off balance, which leaves you in a very stable position and with a perfect opening to counter throw. Some of the people I train with know I leave this open as bait for them and they still go for it, the temptation and instinct to attack that opening is pretty strong. Almost every time, they end up on their backs if they don't try to off balance me first...
     
  5. Makalakumu

    Makalakumu Gonzo Karate Apocalypse

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    Nick, you're probably big enough to pull that off a good amount of time...:)

    Seriously though, that is a good counter. A counter for that counter is to fake like you're going for that leg and then twist the hips and bring the rear leg up really fast into kane sute. The leg that the uki thought was going to do o soto gari now ends up taking them down in a different way.
     
  6. bignick

    bignick Senior Master

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    You can use a faked O Soto Gari to make them draw that leg back and open up for a number of throws, I like to do tai otoshi from that, because when they draw their leg back it gives me a lot more room to work in, I've got long legs and it makes it all that much easier to get my legs in the right position for the throw
     
  7. bignick

    bignick Senior Master

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    You should see the other guys in my club, I did it a couple times the other night to an ikkyu, he is kinda small though...only around 6'4'' 290 lbs...
     
  8. Makalakumu

    Makalakumu Gonzo Karate Apocalypse

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    That is a good one too. One really blasts the dust of the tatami with that one. That is hard fall!
     
  9. arnisador

    arnisador Sr. Grandmaster

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  10. Henderson

    Henderson Master Black Belt

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    Just a note for any non-Judoka, or less experienced people that will want to try this throw. Nick makes a very important point here.
    Fully commit to the reaping of uke's leg. Some people have a tendency to want to be kind to their training partner, and will not take out the leg as it should be taken. This can lead to uke's knee being twisted around tori's leg. Not good.

    Just my opinion.

    Respects,
    Frank
     
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  11. JAMJTX

    JAMJTX Blue Belt

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    Link to a video of this throw
    This actually not a well executed technique. The kazushi is not very strong.
    In Osoto-gari, uke should be off balanced to the point where he would fall (or nearly fall) if tori let go of him. The reap is a finishing technique.
    We use the "chest to chest bump" as mentioned earlier, driving into uke. Also, Plus a turning motion using the sleeve and lapel.

    Sure, it's hard to get all of this when uke is fighting back and trying to do the same things to you. But in a static practice, like the video, it should all be clearly seen.
     
  12. jujutsu_indonesia

    jujutsu_indonesia Black Belt

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    Yup... another Osoto, or simply drop down and get Ippon with a Yoko Wakare.
     
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  13. bignick

    bignick Senior Master

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    As long as we're talking about variations and setups using O Soto Gari, let's not forget about O Soto Otoshi, it can be extremely powerful, especially when someone drops to a deep defensive stance when they see and o soto gari coming....
     
  14. JAMJTX

    JAMJTX Blue Belt

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    I'm sure we're mainly talking about Judo here.
    But for other applications, has anyone ever looked into reaching under the armpit and grabbing the back of the collar or hair and pulling uke down while executing the reap? Or combining Osoto-gari with Shiho nage or irimi nage? It can also work nicely coupled with tenshi nage.
     
  15. bignick

    bignick Senior Master

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    Yes, of course, don't forget attacking pressure points or striking in side of the neck/collarbone/throat/etc to gain a bit of "harder" kuzushi...123
     

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