New to the arts

Discussion in 'Beginners Corner' started by Kathy, Oct 24, 2017.

  1. Kathy

    Kathy White Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2017
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Plz,could someone ,plz tell me what Cho Dan means, my son just began martial arts,thank you
     
  2. Anarax

    Anarax 2nd Black Belt

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2017
    Messages:
    826
    Likes Received:
    239
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Location:
    New Mexico
    What style is he taking? Do you mean chudan?
     
  3. Kathy

    Kathy White Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2017
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Hi,he is taking Korean martial arts,the paper says Cho Dan,ty
     
  4. Kathy

    Kathy White Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2017
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Do you think its a misprint?
     
  5. Blindside

    Blindside Senior Master

    • Founding Member
    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2001
    Messages:
    4,921
    Likes Received:
    558
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Kennewick, WA
    Does the context make sense like a black belt rank? Some korean systems use a "chodan" terminology the same way Japanese systems use "shodan."
     
  6. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

    Top Poster Of Month

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    16,406
    Likes Received:
    4,667
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Hendersonville, NC
    Some context of the usage will help. "Chodan" is (at best) a transcription of a word in one of the Asian languages (probably Korean, but not necessarily), and transcriptions are always difficult to place, since they can vary. So knowing how they are using it will help folks figure out which word it probably refers to.
     
  7. JR 137

    JR 137 Senior Master

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2015
    Messages:
    3,651
    Likes Received:
    2,049
    Trophy Points:
    403
    Location:
    In the dojo
    As far as I know, cho dan (or chodan) is a first degree black belt in Korean.

    I’d say post the entire sentence at least so we know the context for certain.

    Or you or your son can ask the teacher.

    Japanese is shodan.
     
  8. Kathy

    Kathy White Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2017
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ty all for your help,the question is as follows, The topic is Midnight Blue Belt Philosophy and Creativity..question is What does Cho Dan mean ? Ty
     
  9. Kathy

    Kathy White Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2017
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Midnight blue belt
     
  10. kempodisciple

    kempodisciple Senior Master

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Messages:
    3,828
    Likes Received:
    930
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    New York
    Is it like a homework assignment he was given?
     
  11. Kathy

    Kathy White Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2017
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Yes ma'am, I belive it means beginning level,(midnight blue belt
     
  12. Bill Mattocks

    Bill Mattocks Sr. Grandmaster

    • Martial Talk Alumni
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2009
    Messages:
    14,094
    Likes Received:
    2,128
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Michigan
    Welcome to MT!
     
  13. lklawson

    lklawson Senior Master

    • Advisor
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2005
    Messages:
    3,584
    Likes Received:
    798
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Huber Heights, OH
    Sheesh, just give the lady an answer. :p

    "Cho Dan" is generally recognized as the "First Degree Black Belt" from some Korean Martial Arts systems, which is a sort of misunderstanding of the "Dan" and "Black Belt" system coming from similar Japanese Karate systems but widely adopted by most Asian based martial arts, particularly as taught in Western nations. The "Dan" ranking system is usually paired with a colored belt ranking system; usually "Gup" (ranks below "Dan/Black-belt") in Korean systems or "Kyu" (ranks below "Dan/Black-belt") in Japanese systems. Basically a beginning student earns colored belts as they advance to First Degree Black Belt and then advancing "degrees" (numbers) of Black Belt thereafter.

    "Midnight Blue" is the color often chosen for some Korean martial arts instead of black for the belt color of their first "Dan" ("Black Belt") rank, notably Tang Soo Do and branches/derivatives including Mu Duk Kwan. The reason "Midnight Blue" (nearly black but actually blue) was chosen instead of black is reported to be any number of different reasons, but often is related to the supposition that "black" might represent perfection or is sometimes linked to supposed cultural superstitions revolving around death (I believe this to be nothing but a popular myth). In any case, it is generally the "rank" equivalent of a black belt (not that any such thing as "rank equivalent" truly exists).

    It is common for Martial Arts systems as taught in Western nations to express an official "philosophy" surrounding their system and to equate it with the "achievement" of the first Dan rank. This "philosophy" usually includes elements of a code of conduct and a general outlook on life. Think of it as the usual stuff such as "bravery," "self sacrifice," "honor," "tradition," "charity," "community involvement," "dedication," "honesty," etc. Some of them look eerily similar to a "Mission Statement" one might see from a Business.

    The student is almost always provided with or directed to materials which will detail the exact expression of the "philosophy," often as expressed by the founder of whatever branch of martial arts are being studied. The student will most likely have a handout, handbook, or be directed to the organizations web page. Look in those.

    In summary:
    "Cho Dan" = "Shodan" = "First Black Belt" = "Official Recognition of Some Minimum Level of Competence or Expertise as Relevant Only to That Specific Martial System."

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
    • Useful Useful x 1
  14. Kathy

    Kathy White Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2017
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ty so much ,so would it be correct in saying beginning level
     
  15. lklawson

    lklawson Senior Master

    • Advisor
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2005
    Messages:
    3,584
    Likes Received:
    798
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Huber Heights, OH
  16. Kathy

    Kathy White Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2017
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
  17. pgsmith

    pgsmith Master of Arts

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2005
    Messages:
    1,534
    Likes Received:
    435
    Trophy Points:
    123
    Location:
    Texas
    Hello Kathy, welcome to MT.

    Kirk has given you a very good answer to your initial question, so I am going to diverge here in a different direction and give you a few things to think about, since both you and your son are new to the martial arts.

    First, don't get his martial arts class confused with school. While they both teach, they have very different methods and aims. In school, getting a good grade is the goal, and parents usually help their children toward achieving that grade. In the martial arts, the journey is the thing and improvement is the only goal. You, as the parent, have to be careful not to help them overly much or you'll end up stealing their opportunity to improve. Their struggle leads to their improvement.

    Second, martial arts classes for youth almost always contain elements of character development. Part of that is setting them questions and problems to work out. The instructor will always provide the opportunity for the students to learn the answers to the questions posed (or direct them to where they can find the answers), but it's the student's responsibility to pay attention and derive the answers. While it's good that you are interested enough to hunt down the answers, be aware that the instructor is the only one that knows just what answer he wants, and it's part of the student's training to figure out what that answer is.

    Feel free to push him and prod him about practicing, but be careful not to do things for him so he doesn't miss out on any of his training. :)

    Finally, feel free to come on here at MT and ask any questions you may have about martial arts and what they have your son doing. The more you understand what he's doing the better, and there are quite a number of experienced martial arts instructors here that can help you with that.

    Cheers, and let us know how he does!
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
    • Like Like x 1

Share This Page