Multiple styles

Discussion in 'General Self Defense' started by DAC..florida, Mar 29, 2003.

  1. DAC..florida

    DAC..florida Purple Belt

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    Multiple styles

    How many train in more than one style or have in the past?

    If so why?



    I feel that it is hard to get everything that you need to know from one style.
     
  2. Well, it depends.

    Each style has something to offer, and that something might be what you're looking for. But it varies from instructor to instructor.

    But mainly, I wrestled in high school because I thought it would be interesting and I loved it, and did very well. I boxed in college because again, was fun. I still practice what I learned in my root arts as I like to call them, but there are times when an oppourtunity is given to you.

    I don't care what style you do, if there's a chance for you to take, do it. Wrestling all four years in high school costed me $80... I took it. And it was the top program in the state. Boxing was free, and I also competed in college.

    If a famous instructor comes to the area and opens a school, I suggest you at least check it out.
     
  3. ECYili

    ECYili Guest

    I have trainning in 2 styles Tang Soo Do and now Yi Li Chuan Kung Fu.
    But I have been around and seen many different martial arts from Okinawan karate, Aikido, Kung Fu etc and the men that have spent their lives studying their singular art. One of the many things that I have learned from them is that, no matter what style you practice, it's ALL there. If you spend enough time and train the RIGHT way you'll find it. Most people don't have the desire or will to go through long, mostly tedious journey it takes to find it. That's why alot (not all) people jump around from school to school trying to get the pieces they think a chosen martial art has or doesn't have.

    That's just my thoughts. I'm not bagging on anyone here or the people that fall into the category above. Everyone has there right to do what makes them happy and if that's going from school to school then that's just peachy :asian:

    Take care

    Dan
     
  4. KatGurl

    KatGurl Guest

    I take American Kenpo and Russian Systema. I take both because I'm in the middle of them anyways. My dad is an instructor in American Kenpo, and he has Arthur Sennot come down to his school to teach Russian Systema.
     
  5. ydma1796

    ydma1796 Guest

    I'm first and foremost a TKD practioner.... (have been for 4 years now off and on) I've also picked up Kenpo for the hand techniques. I practice escrima / kali for the more indepth weapon stylings. And lately I've been thinging of taking up Judo (It's free at my local YMCA so how can I go wrong?)

    Salute :asian:
    Kevin
     
  6. ace

    ace Master of Arts

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    I Train in in Submisson Wrestling, F.M.A. & Wrestling
    I've also done Ju Jitsu, Mauy Thai, Bando * Boxing* ,J.K.D.



    No art has all the answers.
    I prefer to keep an Mind.

    Of All the Arts i've practise Submisson Wrestling
    is My Fav.


    I look to see what is comon & how i can
    Blend The arts to Work for Me
    :D
     
  7. A.R.K.

    A.R.K. Guest

    Ace,

    Is that similar to the catch-as-catch-can submission wrestling? I cross-train with a fellow Deputy that studied under Matt Fury, who in turn trained under Karl Goch.
     
  8. theletch1

    theletch1 Grandmaster

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    I have only "officially" trained in kenpo but this weekend we had the honor of cross training with my sifu's brother and a couple of his students. He instructs ninjutsu. I was really impressed by the techniques and by the group as a whole. I was also pleasantly surprised to find that there are some things that just kinda follow from one style to another. We were able to do a technique in ninjutsu and "add-on" a technique from our kenpo training almost seamlessly and vice versa.

    I don't know that I agree that every style has everything you need. Maybe I just haven't been studying long enough. Even the stuff that was similar from one style to the next had at the very least a slightly different take. I'd have to say, especially after this weekend, that loyalty to your style is a great thing but don't let that loyalty prevent you from crosstraining. That one extra technique or maybe even that one slight difference to something you already know could make all the difference in the world.

    Respectfully,
    Theletch1:asian:
     
  9. ace

    ace Master of Arts

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    in Some Ways Yes .

    At the School We have a Group of Wrestlers
    With Back Rounds in Free Styel & Folk as well Judo & BJJ

    We Practise upper & Lower body Submissons
    as Well as throws & take downs.
    We Start Every Thing Standing & Do ad Strikes from Timt to Time

    We have competed in NHB/MMA,Kumite Ju Jitsu,Submisson grappling, Judo & BJJ Turnaments.
     
  10. Matt Stone

    Matt Stone Master of Arts

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    Yiliquan since 1985.

    Modern Arnis since 2001.

    Ryu Te Karate since 2002.

    There is nothing wrong with studying multiple styles, but I wouldn't recommend it until a person had achieved a good foundation in one main art.

    Gambarimasu.
    :asian: :tank: :asian:
     
  11. Wmarden

    Wmarden Guest

    There is a difference between a deep study of a couple of arts(or more) and school hopping.

    Right now for me I am building a foundation in Ju-Jitsu. Once I have achieved a certain rank or basic knowledge I will add other formal instruction. But this seems to be the best foundation art available in this area, at least the best for me anyway. Once I get a certain rank or get some basic comfort in my skills I will know more what to look for to make myself a more complete warrior.

    I also train mostly by myself with firearms and a handful of other weapons. And it is a similar skill progression in that it gets slowly better and one introduces more advanced concepts the better one does the basics. And as in ju-jitsu I have a long ways to go towards being competant.

    As for a second art, I would probably look to either an art like TKD for leg strikes or more likely to a filipino art for weapons work.
     
  12. DAC..florida

    DAC..florida Purple Belt

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    Great info.. keep it coming.

    I must say I'm a little surprized that there's nothing negative here yet!! I would like to hear everyones opinion.
     
  13. chufeng

    chufeng Guest

    I boxed...
    I wrestled...
    I played Judo...
    I tried TaeKwonDo...

    But when I found YiLiQuan...that is what I stuck with...

    After several years in YiLi I studied Aikido for a short time, until I saw it was already part of my art...I also trained for a short time in FutGaKun under Arthur Lee...I was able to use the perspective of that training to find new things within YiLi...things that were there all along...

    Now, I just do YiLiQuan...

    People will try out different arts...when they find the one that is right for them, they should stick with that one and explore it deeply...I think they will find that we all arrive at the same place eventually.

    :asian:
    chufeng
     
  14. I've been in Kali for 4 years now. So far it has had everything I need in it. Great Footwork, Weapons, Hand to Hand and Grappling Skills. The only thing its lacking in for me the kicking section (FMA only has practical kicks unlike the more show off types in TKD etc). Later on in life, when I get a job and leave school and have some time on my hands I would like to start Wing Chun and possibly after that BJJ. But for now Kali has everything I need....:asian:
     
  15. khadaji

    khadaji Guest

    I have done Tee Kwan Do, in the past, and currently do Fencing, and Systema. I also have done a little bit of school hopping with Akito, Sodikan, Kendo.

    However in my System training we bring in many things from many other arts. From Arnis, Wrestling, JKD, and many other things. Depends what each of us can offor.

    I like training in multible styles. I see it as a way to close gaps in your fighting. It gives you more versitility to draw uppon.
     
  16. Matt Stone

    Matt Stone Master of Arts

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    Did you mean Aikido and Shotokan in that post? If not, what are Akito and Sodikan?
     
  17. DAC..florida

    DAC..florida Purple Belt

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    Excellent info.. here lets keep it going!

    Still no negative I cant believe that almost everyone has atleast
    2 style under thier belt.:goop:
     

  18. I'll give you negative. I dont believe in cross training because I would rather be Good in one style then alright in a half a dozen styles. Why be decent at grappling AND kicking AND punching when you can just start one art like Hapkido and get it all. Whats the point of doing TKD AND BJJ AND Wing Chun. Its also a lot easier to focus in one art :cuss:


    Theres some negative for ya :D
     
  19. khadaji

    khadaji Guest

    quote: Originally posted by Yiliquan1

    Did you mean Aikido and Shotokan in that post? If not, what are Akito and Sodikan?
    ---

    Sorry, they are Aikido and Shotokan. simple mispellings. I am by no means a master of spelling, and typing on my crappy keyboard is no help either... :asian:
     
  20. Matt Stone

    Matt Stone Master of Arts

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    And therein lies the inherent flaw in many MMAists' approach to training... They learn a little here, a little there, but their total learning amounts to "a little."

    There is really nothing wrong with studying other things once you have a substantial base in one art. I studied Yiliquan for about 12 years before I took Aikido. Then, a few years later, I studied Shuri-te for a brief period, Modern Arnis, and started learning Ryu Te Karate. However, through it all, I continue to study Yiliquan.

    I enjoyed the other arts I studied, and while Ryu Te is the only one I would really consider studying for the rest of my life (in addition to Yiliquan), the other arts I studied (as well as the other arts I plan on studying in the future) have provided me alternate perspectives on my main art. All of Modern Arnis footwork is included in only one of eight methods of footwork application contained in Yiliquan. No big deal then, right? Wrong. Because Yili applies that footwork with one mentality, while Modern Arnis does so with another. That other perspective allows me to appreciate an external view into Yili, and so betters my understanding of Yili footwork in general.

    The only real problem I see with "crosstraining" is when a person lack sufficient grounding to allow them to understand the lessons they are learning. "Dojo hopping" should be a huge no-no. Training elsewhere used to be a requirement in many arts, Yiliquan among them. But not until an advanced level. And so it should be.

    Gambarimasu.
    :asian: :tank: :asian:123
     

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