More German Longsword Badassery :)

Discussion in 'Historical European Swords and Sword Arts' started by Langenschwert, Mar 1, 2011.

  1. Langenschwert

    Langenschwert Master Black Belt

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    Very nice.



    Best regards,

    -Mark
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 24, 2014
  2. Ken Morgan

    Ken Morgan Senior Master

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    Nice.

    Just curious, what are your targets? It seems that they are constantly going for the throat, and in so doing lose the advantage of such a long weapon. Are the knees, wrists, hands allowed? Or was this specifically practice for the upper targets?

    BTW I’m quite disappointed that there was no sword spinning or twirling, quite disappointed indeed…. :)
     
  3. Langenschwert

    Langenschwert Master Black Belt

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    There are quite a lot of attacks to the wrists in the krumphau section. In the German system, the primary target is the head for obvious reasons. Since it's intended for unarmoured duelling, any target is valid. Legs are hard to get though, since you can void the leg and take the head in one movement with a weapon of that length. Basically this showcases two strikes: The Krumphau (Crooked Strike) which is a strike with the forward edge from your right side to the opponent's right side while crossing your hands. It can also target (from the outside) the hands of a person standing in left Ochs (hands high, point threatening opponent's face) The other is the Schielhau, which is a descending strike with the back edge (vertical or angled), palm away from the opponent. This is used to attack someone standing in Pflug (similar to Chudan), Longpoint, or can intercept an incoming Oberhau (kesa) with the back edge and hit the head or shoulder simultaneously or nearly so.


    Heh. They don't like majorettes in the Slovak Republic, methinks. :)

    Best regards,

    -Mark


     
  4. Bruno@MT

    Bruno@MT Senior Master

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    Very nice. Even with the protection, that kind of training is probably fairly dangerous? I mean a newbie could do significant damage if he didn't have enough conrol?
     
  5. Steve

    Steve Mostly Harmless

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    That was really, really cool to watch.
     
  6. Sukerkin

    Sukerkin Have the courage to speak softly

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    ROFLKLITA! You sir, are a very bad man :D.
     
  7. Ray B

    Ray B Green Belt

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    Very nice.:)

    Best regards,

    Ray Baldonade
    AKA, LangenSchwantz
     
  8. Langenschwert

    Langenschwert Master Black Belt

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    Yes. Those training weapons actually weigh more than a sharp sword... they're pushing 4lbs, but are blunt and flexible. Control is the name of the game. Given that they are training unarmoured duelling, one must learn a certain fear of the blade, but at the same time NOT be fearful of it since in a "real" encounter one had to be bold and agressive. One really can't do the art with intent without fencing masks since many times the opponent will drive your blade into himself and that is hard to do without making firm contact.

    Newbies can be very dangerous. Ironically, the sooner they start with steel, the sooner they learn control. One master back in the day insisted all drilling be done with sharps!

    Best regards,

    -Mark
     
  9. anyaki

    anyaki White Belt

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    Wow... we still spar with nylon wasters, but I am starting to think it might be a good idea to try out those feders... :) One of the ladies in our club did a shielhau on me during high intensity sparring. I've never been able to do that (yet!)
     
  10. Brian R. VanCise

    Brian R. VanCise MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I liked it quite a bit! Thanks Langenschwert!
     

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