Is a Shark Bite Striking or Grappling?

Discussion in 'The Locker Room Bar & Grill' started by skribs, May 17, 2020.

  1. skribs

    skribs Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2013
    Messages:
    5,477
    Likes Received:
    1,303
    Trophy Points:
    263
    There was a thread on another site I thought would be fun to discuss here. A game of sorts. Trying to categorize animal fighting techniques as either striking or grappling. For example, obvious striking techniques:
    • Goat's headbutt
    • Horse's kick
    • Cats batting
    Obvious grappling techniques:
    • Scorpion holding prey in its pincers
    • Boa constrictor
    • Lion suffocating its prey with a neck bite
    • Crocodile's death roll
    However, there are some animals that were less obvious. The one that sparked the most debate? Sharks. Now, you'll notice that 3 of the 4 grappling techniques I mention above involve bites - even the boa, their constriction starts with a bite, which they use as an anchor to wind around the prey. But shark bites are quick, and they just pull a chunk out. I posit that there's not enough time that they have a grip on you to consider it a grappling technique, and it's instead a strike.

    What do you think? Agree or disagree?
     
  2. Flying Crane

    Flying Crane Sr. Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2005
    Messages:
    12,984
    Likes Received:
    2,547
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Maybe we need a new category: it’s a bite. It isn’t a grapple. It rips out a hunk of you and leaves you floating.

    There is an element of striking, as the shark typically comes in fast and hard and delivers that bite with full-body impact at high speed (based on footage I’ve seen of great whites in the Farallon Islands off the coast of San Francisco, and what I’ve read about tigers and oceanic White tips).

    So I put it at a strike, but with a new classification: a ripping bite.

    But maybe some other sharks don’t deliver the bite with that high speed impact. I’ve seen other footage other other types of sharks not using the high speed impact.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. jobo

    jobo Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2017
    Messages:
    8,496
    Likes Received:
    1,254
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    i think your bored ?

    if yu want to use animals as a learning point, its better to consider the survival strategies they employ. animal who only have teeth as a weapon are only going to bite you, animals that have teeth and claws will use both, animal that weigh a ton have a bad habit of standing on you

    as to the question, if i bite you, is it a strike or a wrestling technique, id say neither its a brawling technique which differs from a shark in that its dinner, im not aware that sharks bite for any other reason
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2020
    • Dislike Dislike x 1
  4. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2012
    Messages:
    9,365
    Likes Received:
    2,321
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Austin, Tx/Shell Beach, Ca
    The original of wrestling. This is why the wrestling art is much older than the striking art.

    Chinese wrestling: Shuai (wrestle) Chiao (horn) - wrestling with horn.

    [​IMG]
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Monkey Turned Wolf

    Monkey Turned Wolf MT Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Messages:
    7,624
    Likes Received:
    2,326
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    New York
    If they don't hold on-I would say that it's more similar to a strike. But a weapon strike. Since it's dealing damage in a way that fists or legs do not.

    I would repate it to D&D's damage classification and determine what type of damage it would be, or if it would be a hold with damage/how to break free, which would tell you the type of strike it is.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. jobo

    jobo Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2017
    Messages:
    8,496
    Likes Received:
    1,254
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    they come in fast and hard as they are ambush predictors and you cant ambush something slow and gentle, im not sure that makes the bit worse though, you loose a leg no matter what speed the shark is swimming at, ?

    ive just check and sharks seldom if ever fight each other (or anything else for that matter )only kill for food,

    so as they are by nature non combatants they shouldnt be in section on animal combat
     
  7. Buka

    Buka Sr. Grandmaster

    • MartialTalk Mentor
    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2011
    Messages:
    10,705
    Likes Received:
    7,031
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Maui
    Yeah, to me a shark would fall into the category of edged weapons.

    Big sharks.....hungry, scary bastards.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Christopher Adamchek

    Christopher Adamchek Purple Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2018
    Messages:
    313
    Likes Received:
    142
    Trophy Points:
    98
    Location:
    CT
    striking for sure
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. ShortBridge

    ShortBridge 2nd Black Belt

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2015
    Messages:
    886
    Likes Received:
    598
    Trophy Points:
    273
    Location:
    Seattle, WA, USA
    BJJ has proven ineffective against sharks because they don't have legs (so it's hard to take them down) and they don't have necks or arms to choke or bar. That's why I don't study BJJ. If you can't use it in the real world against sharks, what good is it?

    At this point in my life, though, the sharks know me and generally stay clear. They don't want any of this trouble.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Funny Funny x 1
  10. PhotonGuy

    PhotonGuy Senior Master

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2013
    Messages:
    3,599
    Likes Received:
    395
    Trophy Points:
    208
    I would consider it both a strike and a grapple.123
     

Share This Page