I need advice.

Discussion in 'Beginners Corner' started by Ivo, Nov 6, 2018.

  1. BrendanF

    BrendanF Orange Belt

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    No - there are a few different styles of Shuai Jiao. They are discrete schools - not components of other arts.

    Shuai jiao - Wikipedia

    FYI - John Wang was a disciple of Chang Tung Sheng.
     
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  2. DaveB

    DaveB Master Black Belt

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    I've said this before, but despite having no sensible counter argument, people like yourself just carry on putting feelings ahead of the facts.

    Once more, training is not the martial art.
    Training is skill and attribute development.
    Training is what determines fighting ability.
    Training varies from school to school, never mind art to art.

    In 20 years of being in and around martial arts I've encountered only one martial arts school that doesn't spar.
    I've encountered only one that could be called a McDojo.

    Now maybe things are different here in the UK to the US or wherever you may be, but I'd wager your impression of "BS in TCMA" is based more on YouTube videos and forums than anything that could be considered evidence.

    If you've never trained with a Southern crane school you have no idea about either the content of the arts nor the common cultural emphasis in their training.

    If you really want to learn only what is common to combat sports all he need do is check for schools that do Sanshou

    The guy is in a place far from home. What is the point in visiting the other side of the world to do the same stuff he could do in his own back yard.

    My Advice to the OP: take the opportunity to experience as much as you can from as wide and unusual a variety of sources as you can.
    The more you experience, the broader your perspective will be, the broader your skill set will be, the better your foundation.

    After you get back home a Taekwondo school will be the best way to learn to understand how to apply your Capoeira.
     
  3. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    Does Shuai Jiao have punching or kicking techniques?
     
  4. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    Exactly. It's no different than anything else in life. I guess some people make it too hard. There are so many people who jump from system to system without understanding this and all that they end up doing learning different system and never knowing how to actually use the techniques. They fail to understand that it's not the system, it's the training.
     
  5. Hanzou

    Hanzou Senior Master

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    And once again you and Jowga simply refuse to get it.

    For many people, how they train is largely influenced by how the art is trained within their school. If their teacher is training them a certain way, there's a high chance that that's going to be how they train the art itself, inside the school and outside the school. Not everyone is going to be spending time looking for the martial aspect of their art if it isn't taught within the school. And frankly there are arts that simply push bad principles that can't be transitioned to sound principles no matter how much extra study you do in attempting to transform the art into a fighting art.

    Again, I use Jowga's example as a perfect illustration of what I'm talking about. His instructor tossed him out of his school because he was sparring too much and trying to make his art more fighting oriented, while his "sifu" wanted the school more focused on forms and whatever. Jowga decided to continue pushing his art in a more fighting direction, but we're lying to ourselves if we don't acknowledge that most people would have simply stopped sparring and did as their "sifu" commanded.

    Now, me saying that TCMA is full of BS schools may have offended some, but that's simply the reality. There isn't much quality control within that particular group of MA, so you could find a very good school, or a very bad school, and there's no way to tell the difference until you're getting pummeled by someone. I'm also very skeptical of the effectiveness of kata/form practice in terms of developing martial skill. As I said, I would recommend the TS simply search out a school within a group of MA that has a high level of quality control, and is simply more fight-oriented by design instead of some archaic traditional system that's more than likely going to lead him right back to where he is now. If you're seeking to learn about Chinese culture and some archaic fighting principles, by all means, go learn how to fight like a bird. If you're trying to learn how to fight in the modern context, TS would be better served finding a modern system designed for actual fighting.

    And again, Sanshou/Sanda, and Shuai Jiao would fit the bill just fine.
     
  6. Hanzou

    Hanzou Senior Master

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    Actually it does. A MMA fighter well versed in striking and grappling can afford to do crazy stuff to win fights. See Anderson Silva and Jon Jones who do wacky stuff in the octagon because they dominate fights and are highly skilled in multiple MAs.

    Then why are you bringing it up?

    As I said before, for many martial artists, the only place where they can train is their school. In my case for example, I never had the space or the partner to effectively practice Bjj alone in my house, so instead I spent additional time in the training hall which had extended hours for practice. Now imagine if my school didn't offer that training time, or the school looked down on sparring or fighting? That would retard my development.

    Not really. I've heard of plenty of Kung Fu practitioners who have gotten the axe because they cross-trained in other systems, or were too focused on fighting instead of what their teacher thought their art was supposed to be like.


    My question is that if you're never able to practice the movements slow and deliberately, and at full speed/power, how would you ever be able to apply it when someone is trying to punch or kick you?
     
  7. Hanzou

    Hanzou Senior Master

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    Yeah, that's what I thought. Thanks for the clarification.
     
  8. DaveB

    DaveB Master Black Belt

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    If I'm the one who doesn't get it, how come nothing you wrote actually countered my point?

    You are writing about a fantasy that you have in your head.
    "For many people", "If their teacher trains them a certain way it's indicative of how the art trains,"

    This is all BS supposition based on an impression you have. As I said in my experience Schools that don't spar are the exception not the rule. I've never encountered anything to disprove that.

    The idea that the way one school trains indicates how the art trains is disproven by the wing chun forum. Each art brings it's own traditions, but whether they are good or bad there is a world of scope outside of those traditions. It is foolish to reduce any art to it's stereotypes.
     
  9. Hanzou

    Hanzou Senior Master

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    Yeah, you probably should have quoted the entire sentence:

    It doesn't matter how every single school in the art trains if the school close to you happens to be the school that doesn't spar, and is more concerned about looking pretty or adhering to tradition than actually learning how to fight. Even if they have sparring, it can be sparring within a bubble if the school disallows hard sparring, disallows cross-training, limits sparring to a few times a week or even once a month, spend too much time on forms, or disallows bringing in outside influences to enhance the sparring experience. Sherif Bey had plenty of sparring in his Hung Ga school, and he still got tooled by some amateur street fighter.

    Why? Because he was operating under bad principles.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2018
  10. BrendanF

    BrendanF Orange Belt

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    I believe so - but i'm no expert on SC.

    John Wang and his older brother developed Combat SC from Chang's traditional version - I think it includes striking.

    Hopefully he'll chime in.
     
  11. DaveB

    DaveB Master Black Belt

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    My point is that all this is "if, if, if".

    Put all those ifs on an Mms school and it would suck just as much.

    If your school is crud, then your school is crud, it doesn't matter if it's MMA, kung fu or whatever.

    The reverse is also true: a good school is a good school regardless of the style.
     
  12. Hanzou

    Hanzou Senior Master

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    Again, there is a higher level of quality control in Bjj, Judo, Boxing, Sanda, MMA, Muay Thai etc. because there is a competitive standard in place. There is no such standard in TCMAs, and some schools get upset when you have the audacity to want to spar, cross train, or consider adding other style's techniques to your system. That sort of environment allows all sorts of crazy myths, legends and nonsense to flourish.
     
  13. kempodisciple

    kempodisciple Senior Master

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    Shui Jiao may be it's own style, but Kung Fu isn't an art, it's an umbrella term for CMA. So styles within that umbrella of CMA that are grappling focused, could be considered the grappling part of Kung Fu.
     
  14. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    People who fall into this category are ones who really don't want to actually know how to fight using Martial arts. Most people take martial arts for exercise and not to learn how to fight and that's why they don't push to learn about the martial aspect of the system. Those who actually want to learn how to fight will always take the extra step and venture into sparring.

    Most people I know who want to know how to fight make that a goal regardless of what a teacher says. Most people who are looking for Status of being sifu or "cool martial arts guy / gal" are more likely to stop and follow the teacher's wishes to not fight.

    There will always be resistance when someone's goal doesn't line up with your own, which is why you and I are often at odds. It's not a bad thing, it's just a human thing. If I really want to learn how to use Kung Fu in a fight then that's my goal. If my teacher goal is interferes with mine then I'll quit and find another teacher. In my on case, I just got kicked out, but my dedication to Jow Ga brought 1 thing out to light. Kung Fu is bigger than any on Sifu.

    I have never had difficulty in knowing which schools actually cared about being able to fight. The only difficulty I have ever had with Martial Arts was knowing who was teaching crap. Now that I know more about martial arts techniques in general and fighting. It's much easier for me to spot schools that are serious about learning how to use their techniques.





    If I saw this I would walk away. Not because of what I see, but because of what I don't hear. COACHING, Saying SEPARATE and GET ON YOUR FEET, is not coaching. No corrections are being made for serious mistakes. Make a serious mistake in my class and I'll stop the sparring to point it out, while it's fresh on your mind.


    No need to add. I have a good idea of how he trains and he has made it clear on how he has learned, so there would be striking in what he teaches, but that may be exception and not the norm. For example, GPSeymour would be the exception and not the norm for his system. Anything that these two guys do would be to expand the system in a way that is different from what is normally taught.
     
  15. DaveB

    DaveB Master Black Belt

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    Note the world
    And again, your spreading myths and rumours about non competitive ma is my issue, especially when you can find TCMA with competitive training standards as well.

    Instead of trashing what you don't know why not just promote what you do know?
     
  16. Hanzou

    Hanzou Senior Master

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    Hence my point that it would be in TS' best interests to simply find a MA school that is based around learning how to fight, and whose martial aspect is apparent and available on the surface. For example, I read a thread in the Internal Arts forum about a guy who is digging through Taiji for fighting applications. In Bjj, we don't need to do any digging, it's directly taught to us and we drill it constantly.

    And that's my second point: I don't have to worry about getting kicked out of a Bjj gym because of desire to learn how to use my skill in a fight, or is serious about learning to use their techniques, because that's one of the main purposes of the system. What happened to you is almost exclusively a feature of TCMA.
     
  17. Hanzou

    Hanzou Senior Master

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    Where's the myths and rumors?
     
  18. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    There is no difference in these two. Both are the same process.


    Here's the process that everyone want to learn how to fight goes through, regardless of if they are in a school or learning on their own. The only real changes is going to be the degree in which they do #3 -#5

    TMA Application Process
    1. Learn the technique
    2. Drill the technique
    3. Learn to apply the technique through attempted use in quality/ effective sparring
    4. Review and analyze your efforts, failures, successes, plans and dig for better understanding. Figure out the why and how. ("digging" occurs here)
    5. Make necessary changes and continue to apply the technique through attempted use in quality/ effective sparring

    BJJ Application Process
    1. Learn the technique
    2. Drill the technique
    3. Learn to apply the technique through attempted use in quality/ effective sparring
    4. Review and analyze your efforts, failures, successes, plans and dig for better understanding. Figure out the why and how. ("digging" occurs here)
    5. Make necessary changes and continue to apply the technique through attempted use in quality/ effective sparring

    Muay Thai Application Process
    1. Learn the technique
    2. Drill the technique
    3. Learn to apply the technique through attempted use in quality/ effective sparring
    4. Review and analyze your efforts, failures, successes, plans and dig for better understanding. Figure out the why and how. ("digging" occurs here)
    5. Make necessary changes and continue to apply the technique through attempted use in quality/ effective sparring

    You can still get kicked out of BJJ gyms for other reasons. My situation was probably unique to me and not representative of TMA as a whole.
    1. How many TMA school are there in the World?
    2. How many TMA student have trained in the school or are training in the school, since it's creation
    3. How many TMA schools have kick a student out because of their interest to learn how to use the system to fight?

    You'll find more cases of people accidentally shooting themselves than you will a TMA student getting kicked out for wanting to learn how to use the system for fighting.

    Using my experience as a reason not to do TMA is a horrible reason for not training in a TMA. It's even more unreasonable to think that the exact same thing is going to happen to someone else.
     
  19. Hanzou

    Hanzou Senior Master

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    If you're learning the technique through a form/kata instead of direct application, it's extremely different. ESPECIALLY if your instructor has a negative attitude towards sparring and just wants to teach the form.

    I've heard of similar situations occurring in other TMAs. Mainly opposition to cross-training and sparring practice. What happened to you didn't surprise me one bit.

    Frankly the only way you can get kicked out of a Bjj gym is if you're a rude jerk during instruction (interrupting the teacher while his giving instruction) or you purposely hurt your training partners. You're not going to get kicked out because you went to a Judo gym the other day and wanted to practice a few Judo throws during rolling.

    Don't tens of thousands of people accidentally shoot themselves every year?

    I'm not just using your experience, I'm also using the internal flaws of TMA practice as well.
     
  20. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    It's not different. It goes through the same process. It just takes longer because you don't have the coaching there to point out the mistakes. For me I had to be my own coach. There was no one telling me where I was missing opportunities. I had to separate my sparring into 3 train of thoughts. Study, coach, and fight. Had I had a coach then I could have focus on just the fighting part. A coach would have picked up on the things I could have studied to improve and could point out my mistakes.

    This is why I showed the videos of sparring where in 2 of the videos you could hear coaching going on. In the last video, kids were just through punches and kicks and making a lot of mistakes that should have been corrected right there on the spot, starting with stances.

    If the TMA school doesn't coach during sparring then I wouldn't bother training there. While I didn't have my own coaching after I stepped into the instructor's role, I did have some before then. Not only from my school but from schools that I sparred against. I always made sure those who I trained were also coached.
    I would have been all over this as an instructor or coach.


    Sometimes you can let the little mistake go by and then address them after the round, but the big mistakes need to be addressed right away and in front of the class so that the others can learn as well. This not only helps people to learn but it also helps the students who are watching to identify vulnerabilities. In there opponent. When you don't have coaching then you need to record your sparring sessions so you can start to identify some of the things that coaches would have been correcting.
     

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