Help Needed, Unidentified Injury to foot

Discussion in 'Health Tips for the Martial Artist' started by Carson Elmore, May 15, 2020.

  1. Carson Elmore

    Carson Elmore White Belt

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    Got a call from the Dr office today. Over the phone, they told me that I have severe cartilage in the joint where the great toe and ball of the foot meet. The Dr's theory was that the original injury may have basically torn a chunk of cartilage out, therefore. the toe cannot sit in the joint correctly anymore.Which is why when i push off/pivot, it gives the sensation of dislocation. Seems like this is most likely the injury! That being said, anyone suffered anything like this?
     
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  2. Carson Elmore

    Carson Elmore White Belt

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    Also relived that it was not just in my head haha. Although that wouldn't involve a surgery to fix, I think that would be a tough shot to my pride.
     
  3. Carson Elmore

    Carson Elmore White Belt

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    *Severe cartilage damage* Sorry i missed a word there
     
  4. dvcochran

    dvcochran Senior Master

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    I have had cartilage damage/injury but not where you describe. Can it be repaired?
     
  5. Monkey Turned Wolf

    Monkey Turned Wolf MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I 'liked' this, not because I like that you're missing cartilage, but because you now finally know what is going on. Are you going to go for surgery to have it repaired/replaced?
     
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  6. Carson Elmore

    Carson Elmore White Belt

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    Thank you for the support Monkey Turned Wolf! Also Dvcochran, where was your injury/what was your treatment.

    I am going in Tuesday for the official follow-up to discuss possible short term and long term options. I am keeping all options open now. It will be a tough decision, since it does not limit my everyday activity very much, or even at all. It only prevents me from being able to participate in intense activities like sprinting, kickboxing, playing basketball. I can do these things but not at the level of intensity I enjoy and have the energy for. I am very interested in Dvcochran experience. Being 25 years old, I have a lot of years of training in front of me (if I am able), but that also means i could have a lot of years of not being able to train if I chose something that makes it worse.
     
  7. dvcochran

    dvcochran Senior Master

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    The injury closest one to your symptoms is my right ankle.
    Growing up I simply had weak ankles and twisted and rolled them them all the time. We had/have a very active farming lifestyle so I occasionally got some pretty nasty sprains that would swell and badly bruise.
    In my early 30's I was setting at a table near a manufacturing machine programming the PLC. When concentrating I often bounce my feet. Inside the plant it was loud enough that we were required to wear ear plugs. While bouncing my feet, there was a loud 'crack!' and an operator near me turned and asked "what was that?" My right foot stung and had turned inward and would not straighten out. I pulled my leg up and when I rotated my ankle it felt more like I was rolling dish towel around. It was stinging/burning but was not terribly painful as long as I stayed seated.
    I finished a couple more hours of programming and hobbled back to my office. I had noticed pressure in my shoe and when I checked my leg at the lower calf had swollen pretty bad and there was a big knot on the side. And the pain was getting worse.
    I went to a local doctor and he said I had broken my broken my fibula (small shin bone). I was skeptical and was able to get an appointment the next day with my regular Ortho. He did some scans including an MRI and figured out that because I had damaged and lost a small piece of the cartilage in my ankle joint, over time it had also damaged the tubes that the tendons on the outside of the ankle run through. What we heard was the last tendon snapping and the knot was where it has pulled back in a wad.
    Other than cleaning up the joint, he said the damage was already done to the cartilage. But he was able to graph new tubes and re-attach the tendons. The worst part was having to wear nine different thigh high casts that were replaced ever three weeks. The first had my foot set with my toes pointed all the was forward, then with each proceeding cast, the angle came up until the fool was pulled all the way up. I am still amaze how much More stable this ankle is/was after the surgery.

    I have wear and tear and trauma cartilage damage mostly in my knees and elsewhere but I think that is different from what you have.

    My suggestions:
    1.) Do you have a relationship with your doctor and feel comfortable/confident with him/her? If so listen to them. If Anything feels sideways with the diagnostics or recommendations, get a second and (if possible) third opinion. It has to be a relationship where the doctor believes you and you believe them. Hard to find sometimes.
    2.) You are young and it it sounds like you want to be active, which is a Very, very good thing. What does not 'hurt' you during your daily activity right now very likely will down the road. At you age NOTHING should limit your physical activity. Period.
    3.) I had my 31st surgery earlier this year. I am a FIRM believer that any joint surgery, whether open or arthroscopic can/will lead to arthritis setting up in the joint. Everything I have read and studied supports this idea. It does have a lot to do with genetics and lifestyle. The quality of the surgeon and type of surgery greatly matters as well. Have an honest, no BS conversation with your doctor and yourself about the long term positives and Negatives of surgery.
    4.) Don't just do it because 'that is what the doctor said'.

    Study, research and make a plan. From my limited knowledge, based on what you have posted here, it sounds like something that needs to be fixed but I have Zero real evidence to support that. Be smart and in charge or your own body and make the most informed decision you can.
     
  8. Carson Elmore

    Carson Elmore White Belt

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    Man that sounds horrific. I am lucky with the location of the injury, it only causes pain basically when I am doing something i know will test it. The doctor already confirmed there's arthritis in the joint so that is a little too late unfortunately. But i really appreciate you sharing your story and words of wisdom. It sounds like you have a similar expectation on your personal fitness as I do. It is very hard living up to your own expectations when your body fails you. I will be as smart as i can and will more than likely seek out at least a couple other opinions before making any irreversible decisions. I can't thank you enough for what you said. Very insightful, direct, and calming. Thank you again123
     

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