Help...armed robbery right next door...advice???

Discussion in 'General Self Defense' started by Makalakumu, Apr 12, 2007.

  1. BLACK LION

    BLACK LION Black Belt

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    you sound pretty fortified.... but you are not the target my friend... the weak ones are.... like your neighbors... elderly and unprepared... they broke in with a tie iron....they knew they could have thier way with just a metal pipe.... im sure there are plenty of others around that can be terrorized with normal day to day items.... they are not invading homes 5 strong with smgs or shotguns so there is allot you can do to deter the element....
    you are in a position as a "more aware" person to police your street and get others involved so that criminal element know that they are being watched and they will eventually come across someone who will put them down.... forget adding bells and whistles.... a good entry alarm/camera and a dog is fine..... protect the ones who cant protect themselves....
     
  2. kwaichang

    kwaichang Purple Belt

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    hmmm, I was a target now I'm just not as much a target and protecting my family comes first.
     
  3. stonewall1450

    stonewall1450 White Belt

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    Well... I know for a fact criminals are generally stupid and are TERRIFIED of dogs. I myself am the son of a veterinarian so fear of dogs is not really my thing. So having a dog is 1 good step. Getting an alarm is not a bad idea. My dads animal hospital has an Alarm system and it was broken into. Well the alarm sounded and they got away with a WOPPING 16 cents from the cash drawer. So they DO help if you have neighbors and you actually use it. Make sure all your doors and windows are ALWAYS locked. And make sure not to leave tools, ladders, and pretty much anything that could be used to get into your house out in the open. Chain lock stuff that has to be left outside.

    As for the gun(which is what I assume you mean when you say you are armed), if it comes down to you having to use it my advice is the same as several cop friends. Shoot to kill. Give them a chance to surrender, but no compliance means no more breathing. But be sure that you know what your shooting at. Lights are VERY important for that. I would say visible signs and such would help.
     
  4. kwaichang

    kwaichang Purple Belt

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    Agreed. A dead intruder is less likely to sue you for use of excessive force. :)
     
  5. sparky12

    sparky12 Yellow Belt

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    A security storm door can be very effective as it can't be kicked in and is hard to pry open if installed properly. Barking dog and neighborhood watch are also very good. Good luck
     
  6. Drac

    Drac Sr. Grandmaster

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    1.Get to know your neighborhood aka what belongs and what doesn't...

    2.If something looks real suspicious call the cops...Also make sure you have a regular telephone and not rely on your cell phone...In the case of an emergency you can punch in 9-1-1 and set it down..Your name and addy will show up on the dispatcher center incoming calls and a car will be sent..That only happens with an old fashion landline...

    3.Alarm systems are a good deterent, but they have tendency to go off for the slightest reasons..

    4. Light up your backyard..Criminals hate bright lights...If you know an electician ring your garage perimeter with flood lights..
     
  7. jks9199

    jks9199 Administrator Staff Member

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    You live in your community 24/7. Cops generally only work there. You're going to know the neighborhood better than the cops, unless you live life with blinders on.
    A few important points on phones. In my agency, I have to play dispatcher sometimes, so I know more about the 911 system than the average cop. We also have a few dispatchers here who know even more, and they may want to add to or modify this.

    First, know the best way to call your local PD. 911 may go to a central dispatch for a region, while your PD may have a direct number for police dispatch. It's sometimes called a non-emergency number -- but, where I work, if you call our "non-emergency number" in a police emergency, it's ringing on OUR desk, not at the fire & rescue dispatch for the county. This'll save as much as several minutes while the 911 call taker figures out what your calling about and where you're calling from.

    Second, 911 hangups and open lines. GREAT tools for self defense, because most agencies WILL send a cop to find out. If it's accidental, call back and explain right away. They may still send a cop (I generally would), but they'll be less worried when they respond.

    Third, E911 is the system that advises addresses. It doesn't always work right... but it's a good tool a lot of the time. Don't rely blindly on it. Both cell and land lines are portable today; they can move with you, and sometimes the switching makes mistakes. Also, in some cases, especially in border areas of jurisdictions, it may just go to the wrong agency.
    Alarms and lights are great -- but both must in proper working order. Don't skimp the maintenance on these. And make sure that your alarm monitoring company, if you have one, has the right jurisdictional information. I once got to respond to a fire alarm just a bit outside my jurisdiction because the alarm company couldn't get it through their head that they were calling the wrong place... Fortunately, I was close, 'cause the house was on fire.

    One last note on calling in a suspicious person/vehicle/whatever.

    Never hesitate to do so! The dispatcher's job is to prioritize and assess the calls; they won't pull a cop from "something important" to check out your suspicious person. The most you'll do is keep that cop from writing someone a traffic ticket!
     
  8. arnisador

    arnisador Sr. Grandmaster

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    Thanks for this great and well-informed advice! I always wonder...is there any way to test whether they have the right address without making a false 911 call to test it?
     
  9. jks9199

    jks9199 Administrator Staff Member

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    Not really. If you need to make a "test" call to 911 for some reason (like programming a new phone), stay on the line, and BRIEFLY explain why you called. Hang up when the call taker acknowledges you, and says to. DON'T do this repeatedly or often!

    And, don't forget some areas DO NOT have 911 of any type! And cell phones may not go to the proper 911 for where you are, especially if you're in border areas of jurisdictions. It's going to go where the tower is... so, sitting at home, if I dial 911 on my cell, I'm probably going to get the wrong jurisdiction because I'm actually on the border area of 4 different jurisdictions!
     
  10. Drac

    Drac Sr. Grandmaster

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    And some do...Please folks don't be one of them..



    Yes...

    Again 100% truth...Call back and say it was an accident...


    That has happened to me on a squad run..They skimped on the service and the call for help went ot the fire department proper and not to our agency that dispatches for them

    Reread and heed that paragraph folks...
     
  11. Isuam

    Isuam White Belt

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    Something else is also important:
    Train your dog to take food only if a command (keyword) is used, even when you feed him.
    So it does not take food from strangers, who try to poison it.
    It does not eat poison, that people put somewhere to kill rats.
    It does not "steal" food from your table or from the hands of family members.
    And it is also a funny game - you can show him food and say some words that sound similiar to the keyword, before you say the keyword and he does take the food. (My dog's keyword was "express" - and he did not take the food, when i said "exzess")
     
  12. MBatcho1

    MBatcho1 White Belt

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    Even though you are armed, have a dog and new windows and such, I would still get an alarm.

    Your probably gonna spend a little money on the initial set-up but after that its like 30-40 a month. Well, thats the price from where I'm from.

    With all that action in your neighborhood it might be a good idea to move (if thats possible).

    Thats really all I have for you but I hope things work out.
     
  13. Hudson69

    Hudson69 Brown Belt

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    90% of crime is crime of opportunity so based off of this statement I would imagine that someone either imagined that the elderly couple next door were not home or were elderly and would not put up a fight if confronted but judging by the assault I would way it the former and not the latter.

    For personal protection inside the home a gun is one option but care must be taken. For all around protection I would give some suggestions with the first being go to your local Police Department or Sheriff's Office and find someone who is versed in CPTED (Crime Prevention Through Evironmental Design, pronounced Sep-ted here). This will get someone who is LE and can tell you how to modify your yard to make it more secure without making it look like a fortress (unless you want that). The LEO will also be able to spin you up to speed on the home defense/make my day laws in your area as well as give you some, hopefully good ideas, on other things you can do (remember you might get a less than helpful LEO but the CPTED should be solid as long as he/she refers to the manual).

    Other key things you can do:
    • Neighborhood Watch, real or informal
    • Alarm system, contract or as simple as getting window and door alarms/sirens from a hardware store (its what I did)
    • Lights (motion detector lights, on all four corners/sides and any other dark place you want lit up when uninvited company might or might not arrive.
    • Security deadbolts with screws that go into the studs and not the molding.
    • Security chains so you can open the door without totally unlocking it.
    • track locks in the windows/sliding doors or a wooden rod to check movement.
    • Wide angle peephole on all exterior doors.
    • Video tape the inside and outside of your home during daylight hours.
    • Record the serial numbers of any property that has a serial number.
    • Invest in a small safe that will bolt to the walls and floors for documents and video anything mentioned above.
    • Phone tree list of emergency and non-emergency numbers, family members, neighbors, utilities and anyone else you can think of near the phone you use most or by your bed.
    • A flashlight on everylevel.
    • Have a charged cell phone next to the bed and turned on.
    • A good (gooooooood) first aid kit.
    • Trim the bushes out from your house and low enough that no one can hide behind them, especially near a garage or home entrance.
    • Trim tree branches up in the same manner so no bandits can hide under them long enough to get the drop on you.
    • Put a list together of any special needs you or anyone living in your house might have, put it with the phone list(s).
    For gun owners who keep it for home defense only:
    • Get a good gun lock for your heater or better yet a safe and work it so you can open it a 4:12 am in the dark when you are still half out of it or have an adrenaline dump and are shaking. Guns left out get forgotten until the break in and then you just armed a burglar... The safe is a better choice especially when it can be hidden somewhere inconspicuous near the bed.
    • Put home defense rounds in it, not super-magnum +P+ armor piercing rounds. Glaser makes an outstanding home defense round, police rounds will over-penetrate, sometimes even with a solid hit on a bandit and kill someone you dont want it to (Remember there is a lawyer attached to every bullet you own and he doesn't get off until the round stops in a safe location). *HOME DEFENSE ROUND*
    • Have a reload ready, the number 1 malfunction in an auto is the mag. If you have to shelter in place you might need the rounds until the police show up. Use a speed loader for revolvers since if you have to reload your adrenaline will be up and you tend to lose your manual dexterity.
    • Get night sites, not a laser sight, or have your flashlight ready to go.
    • Train, train, train and train some more and then practice your training; Take a home defense course, Practice shooting in low light conditions, practice shooting while holding a flashlight, from kneeling, from prone, from cover.
    • Find out what in your house is cover and not just concealment (expect a burglar/trespasser to be armed with the nastiest round available, ball ammo will penetrate better than LEO hollow points normally).
    • Know how to navigate your home in absolute darkness (remeber where the squeaky floor boards are and the kids toys).
    There is more and if you want shoot me a message and photo of your house and we can go over it, front and back for the CPTED or other options as well as training ideas or just for any questions. I am a freelance safety trainer/security consultant and love doing this in addition to being a veteran Police Officer
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  14. shane

    shane Yellow Belt

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    they work well sufficient as a deterrent. Update your protection on your valuables, use a district "buddy system"- with friends you understand and believe well. If you don't have numerous in there, inquire associates to hold an eye on your dwelling while you're away.
     
  15. elmerq

    elmerq White Belt

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    There's already a lot of great advice on this forum... they are right, you should keep a database of all your items and also place a value to them. Also include the serial numbers.

    A year ago someone broke into my house and stole some pretty valueable items. The cops asked for the serial numbers, model number, and general item description. The insurance company asked for the same thing as well. Saying, "Uh.. I have a black 42 inch LED Samsung television isn't enough." It won't catch the bad guy and your insurance company will need a model number and current price indicator.

    Remember that bad guys are stealing items, not for the item itself sometimes, but to get cash for the items. They steal the item, turn it into a pawn shop, and get the cash. Cops work with the surrounding pawn shops in your neighborhood and warns the pawn shop owners about the item.

    Also, consider joining the local neighborhood watch programs or start one. A neighborhood watch is a government endorsed program. You work with local law enforcement and become their eyes and ears for your neighborhood. You could volunteer to be the regional coordinator and be a voice of information within your community.
     
  16. Balrog

    Balrog Master of Arts

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    Ditto. Contact your local PD for help on organizing one. The "Nosy Neighbor" is one of the best crime deterrents there is.
     
  17. elwin

    elwin Yellow Belt

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    I couldn't have said it any better myself! It really sounds like everything is pretty much covered. However, one critical factor must also be addressed within your self defense training at all times, and that is the "Real Life Factor" for when the worse case actually happens.

    Are you capable of controlling the extreme fear that may totally overwhelm you during the critical moments of the attack? Will you be able to control the inevitable adrenaline rush that may put your body in a sudden state of shock, making you unable to react effectively?(If you don't FREEZE UP!) ARE YOU MENTALLY READY TO PULL THE TRIGGER?

    Your concern (The meth heads attacking you and your family) are all to much a reality. Fully prepare yourself to go ALL the way when it's you or them. You did't look for any trouble, you are the good guy. Hurt him first when he enters your home, for he won't hesitate to hurt you or one of your family members, as demonstrated by the attack on your elderly neighbours.

    NB! If the authorities don't get a full grip on things soon in your area, things could get worse as criminals tend grow bolder and more aggressive the longer they are in action, and getting away with it. You may have to pull the trigger at some point.
     
  18. stonewall1350

    stonewall1350 Blue Belt

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    Without reading I have standard advise that I have heard from many law enforcement officers (I attend conferences on school security and people always ask and there is almost always 3 answers).

    1) Lights
    2) Security System
    3) Dog

    If you are breaking into a home those are 3 things you don't want to deal with. You don't need to be super secure, but you do not want to look like an easy target. People target the path of least resistance. That is what you want to be. You want to look like you are aware...and that you won't be an easy victim.

    Additionally keep an eye on the area and ask the police for more patrols. Make friends with the police. That is what I always do. I try to make friends with patrol cops and the higher ups too. It can't hurt to at least know them :)

    Edit:

    Oh oh oh if you have the option...plant thorny bushes underneath windows that they can access. And make sure all your tools are picked up. Nothing they can use to break in. Meth heads are not known for being prepared...even those 2 mopes happened to be.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  19. JohnnyEnglish

    JohnnyEnglish Green Belt

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    Meth heads around the house ?

    Good Lord! I would advise you to move to an other city as soon as possible, sounds like you are living in some sort of ghetto, this can only end up bad.

    I don't think it is the right area to live in, if you have to prepare to shot someone, sounds actually like hell.
     
  20. Tez3

    Tez3 Sr. Grandmaster

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    He moved to Hawaii if I remember rightly.
     

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