Feels awkward evading punches when practicing trapping drills

Discussion in 'JKD / Jeet Kune Do' started by UnelaborateYetComplex, Feb 13, 2018.

  1. UnelaborateYetComplex

    UnelaborateYetComplex White Belt

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    I'm enrolled in a JKD school that heavily teaches Professor Gary Dill's (1st Gen student) Jeet Kune Do combatives system. In this school, when executing trapping and punching drills with a partner, it's primarily encouraged that we move about 45 degrees off of the center for an oncoming punch and execute our trapping and punching technique (Our partners are encouraged to throw a punch to the nose directly as if they aim to punch the other partner in the face). The problem I have is parrying and moving off the center to avoid the hit. For me, it feels awkward, as if I'm not exactly as fluid as I feel I should be.
    Any tips from a more experienced JKD student/practitioner? I've currently been enrolled in this school for almost a year now.
     
  2. Headhunter

    Headhunter Senior Master

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    Practice
     
  3. Martial D

    Martial D Master Black Belt

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    Also, practice more.
     
  4. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    move off line when you punch. Not when you parry. Which would be awkward as you would be pushing one way and walking the other way.
     
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  5. Martial D

    Martial D Master Black Belt

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    It varies. Even some boxers move off line to Parry(Lomenchenco for instance)

    In many styles shifting your line(moving off center) and parrying/blocking/trapping is pretty standard(WC as an example)
     
  6. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    Yeah sorta. If you are just throwing some sort of cover arm out yeah. If you actually wanted to exert some kind of force while moving away it is going to feel really hinky.

    Actually if you did the lomenchenco style skip all the way around you could probably pull that off.
     
  7. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    You may try the following footwork. If your and your opponent are in

    1. uniform stance - same side forward, always move your back foot,
    2. mirror stance - different side forward, always move your leading foot,

    to line up with his both feet. It's not the leading hand punch (jab) that you need to worry about. It's the back hand punch (cross) that you try to stay away.
     
  8. Touch Of Death

    Touch Of Death Sr. Grandmaster

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    It's your stance.
     
  9. kempodisciple

    kempodisciple Senior Master

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    In general, I find it you move off line while parrying, it's not a real parry. It's really just evading, and the parry is just a sort of insurance
     
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  10. UnelaborateYetComplex

    UnelaborateYetComplex White Belt

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    Yeah, this is something my master and senior ranks stress a ton. We're taught that the parry should aid in pushing off the center, as to move your feet at the same time while weaving your head out of the way.
    Perhaps practice is the only way. I just need some basis off of which I can practice with footwork at home alone.
    At almost purple belt in Hapkido I'm just now getting the hang of proper footwork and deep stance, but I learned very quickly that JKD has its own set of footwork nuances.
     
  11. kempodisciple

    kempodisciple Senior Master

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    Personally, for that particular footwork, I do it closer to 60 degree, but it can be very tough/awkward to do it at 45 until you get used to it. The two pieces of advice I can give you is: don't step too far off-line (side-stepping rather than in), if you do it's very tough to get out of that habit, and try sometimes to do it without the hands at all, to let you focus on the feet more and make sure you don't need the hands involved.

    The key is practice practice practice, if you need to find someone who lives with you (brother, father, roommate, whatever) to just feed you punches to drill it.
     
  12. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    Yeah. But I think he is trying for some sort of parry trap. Which would either require some sort of tricky footwork. Angle out and jump straight back in or a full step with the rear leg and then pivot and change stance or just being awkward.
     
  13. Buka

    Buka Grandmaster

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    Welcome to Martialtalk, UnelaborateYetComplex. :)
     
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  14. TMA17

    TMA17 Purple Belt

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    That's what I was taught at both WC schools I went to. Is your center facing his shoulder or his center at that point?

    I think moving around and being evasive is good. That comes with good practice of footwork whether it be boxing or WC/JKD.
     
  15. Anarax

    Anarax 2nd Black Belt

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    There are multiple styles that parry and move off at a 45 degree angle. Practicing it will help make it feel more natural.
     
  16. NYFIGHTSOURCE

    NYFIGHTSOURCE Yellow Belt

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    Couple tips that I can suggest with out seeing what your movements look like.

    1. Think of the movement as being in...Or corkscrewing your body inward. As the punch comes toward you.... if your are throwing a punch... you should think of your hand moving first. As it starts to progress forward use your footwork and corkscrew slightly off the line and in. Harder than it sounds. What helps?....

    2. Balance and footwork. Be in a good stance... Balance. This will allow you to respond quicker. Pay attention to your own body when you see his punch coming. Are you making any little extra movements that might slow you down. And extra shift in weight to push off on etc... These are important to eliminate to respond in time.

    3. Practice... Go slow. Refine your movement so that it's simple and balanced. Speed up with time... and balance.

    3. Awareness. No if you are not fast... Think about seeing the attack earlier. Obviously if the attack comes from a huge fighting measure you will have more time to respond. But we want to keep a perfect fighting measure. And someone will not throw from far away anyway. So as I teach.... I teach people to watch body movement all the time...Even prior to someone stepping forward or back or sideways etc.... there is shifts in weight. Esp. people who never train non- telegraphic movement. So if you can spot this movement.... then you can have extra time... So now you don't have to be super fast.

    4. As everyone else said..... "Practice"... It comes...
     
  17. yak sao

    yak sao Master of Arts

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    Try this.
    This may not be your exact footwork, I'll just use it to illustrate my point.
    If you are standing with left leg forward:

    Stage 1. Footwork only. Keep hands up as you step offline with left foot to 45 degree angle

    Stage 2 step off 45 degrees with left foot but only parry with front hand...ie pak sao

    Stage 3 step off 45 degrees as above but only punch with rear hand... no parry with front hand

    Stage 4. Put it all together...hands begin at same time, just a split second before the step, so you're not leading with your face. your pak, punch and step all end at the same time.

    If you need to break it down even more, isolate the parry only without a step, punch only without a step, then the simultaneous parry and punch without a step.

    Work on being smooth with your movements instead of fast. If you train for smoothness then speed comes naturally as your movements become second nature.
    If you try to go too fast too soon, you will stiffen up and your movement will be jerky.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2018
  18. UnelaborateYetComplex

    UnelaborateYetComplex White Belt

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    Thank you for the warm welcome, Buka *salute*
     
  19. UnelaborateYetComplex

    UnelaborateYetComplex White Belt

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    Thanks to everyone for the tips. I'll be sure to keep these in mind and practice accordingly. *salute*
     
  20. skribs

    skribs Master Black Belt

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    That's how I've done it since my white belt in TKD and I've never felt awkward doing that motion.
     

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