Developing Explosive Entry Footwork

Discussion in 'General Martial Arts Talk' started by wingchun100, Mar 12, 2019.

  1. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    That was why I said, "I like ..." instead of "You should ..."
     
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  2. jobo

    jobo Grandmaster

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    eer maybe, if you want to improve your sprinting, you lift weights and practise moving fast (sprinting,) if yourwant to be good at sqaut jumps you lift weights and practise moving fast( jumping) I'm not sure there much cross over of sprinters practising jumping to help them run faster, or sqaut jumper running to help there jump height. the common element is weight lifting with is close to a prerequisite for gaining power. it's not clear if he wants power or speed and there not quite the same thing,, one being measured in kw and the other 8n time÷ by distance
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2019
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  3. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    Sometime it's hard to tell whether the OP wants to have general discussion or just "style only" discussion. In another TKD thread, the OP just wants "TKD only" discussion.
     
  4. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    I would say find the moves you think will provide the most benefit from speed and practice them often, trying to be faster each time than you were the last time.
     
  5. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    You can always train:

    - 1 step 3 punches.
    - 1 step 2 punches.
    - 1 step 1 punch.
    - 2 steps 1 punch.
    - 3 steps 1 punch.
     
  6. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    That might be his background, but since he posted in the general MA section, maybe he's looking for answers that are broader than the WC framework.
     
  7. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    Power contributes to speed of entry, but I think he's expressing the desire for the speed, specifically.

    And you're right about the difference in exercises. That's what I was getting at.
     
  8. Hans Larrave

    Hans Larrave Yellow Belt

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    I found this on instagram earlier this week, thats specific to what you are asking about speed training
    https://instagram.com/p/BvH1Q9tFSFj/
     
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  9. Buka

    Buka MT Moderator Staff Member

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    Just a going from Point A to Point B kind of thing by activating the feet quickly.

     
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  10. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    Why do you want to step back before you step in?

    The fastest foot work is the jumping kick.

    Instead of

    - jumping up, you jump forward.
    - kick, you cover the distance.
     
  11. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I've been pondering this. My theory is that it starts with removing the front support, so the weight can fall forward. The more the weight is forward, the harder you can push forward without running out from under your own weight. Stepping the front foot to the back - without shifting weight - then picking up the other foot, leaves you with lots of pressure on the (newly) back foot, and much weight set forward. So you can give maximum push to move forward. I've played with a few different footwork combos to examine this, and I have a hard time finding anything that works as well as this set of movements, as counter-intuitive as it is.
     
  12. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    You have just make a forward step into 2 moves. My jumping kick is still 1 move. 1 is always better than 1,2. Instead of making a kick, you can always use it to cover distance.

     
  13. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    A front leg that is too far forwards will push you backwards.

    It is a double leg mistake people do as well.
     
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  14. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    From most stances, if you just step forward, you don't get the benefit of the weight shifting/falling forward to push against. In the stances where you can get that benefit without needing to step back, the stance is wide enough that the back leg can't push very far forward. It seems to be a basic trigonometry problem. The extra step sets up a structure that allows a more explosive move forward, so is probably more efficient in most cases.

    I've been playing with this pretty carefully, because of my back (threw it out by standing around on Tuesday :rolleyes:), so I haven't been able to try some of the stances I'd like to with the kind of explosive movement I'm talking about.

    EDIT: I meant to add thoughts based on that clip. First, that kick (what we'd call a "jumping front kick" is not a big move forward - the body doesn't move much forward, just enough to get the weight moving, as you're only replacing the front leg with the back. And that shift isn't meant to move in explosively, just to close a little of the space. It's made by shifting the weight over the front leg, and that's as far as the weight moves. If you use that movement (without the kick) and compare it to the step movement from the baseball videos, you can cover a larger distance faster with the latter.

    A key point is that the switching of the feet doesn't delay the movement. Rather, it's what you do to get maximum use of the weight shift that's happening as soon as you pick up that front foot. The other alternative is simply to push with the existing back foot, which (picking up my earlier point) isn't optimally placed to take advantage of the weight shift.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2019
  15. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    And a back leg that's too far back can't push long and hard enough to get maximum entry.
     
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  16. Flying Crane

    Flying Crane Sr. Grandmaster

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    Interesting. You may be on to something there. I will need to play with it a bit, there may be a place for it within the context of some things we do.
     
  17. Buka

    Buka MT Moderator Staff Member

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    It's just a small piece of a puzzle. And it's probably more of a benefit to those that possess a certain amount of natural speed. Obviously, it's results would be different according to whatever stance a practitioner fancies. Not useful for things like a cat stance, full on side stance ect.

    Here's something cool to watch. Nice side view, watch how much motion before either foot ever leaves the blocks. I was a successful sprinter a long time ago. I love starting blocks, BUT if I were to race without starting blocks, I wouldn't do it from a crouch, I'd do it from standing using a blitz step to initiate my movement.



    And, again, in striking or in training the arts, a good part of it is just closing distance. Small distances at that. Unless you are running away. And if I was running away you can bet that first step of mine would be the quickest step I got. Because I am out of here!
     
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  18. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    In the following clip, he steps back before stepping in. Do you agree with his footwork?

     
  19. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    In that context, yes. He's setting the proper distance for the entry. It's not a dynamic situation, so he has to step to the position he wants to start from. It also looks like a demonstration habit of his, given the swinging leg at the beginning of the video. In a dynamic situation, he'd use motion and distance control to set that gap, so he could step into it. That would be less likely to involve a step back, unless he's using that step to pull (to get some counter-pull from his opponent).

    EDIT: Note, I don't think this step back is related to the "blitz step" approach. This one is just setting distance.
     

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