Cutlass opinions

Discussion in 'Sword Arts Talk' started by Grenadier, Aug 24, 2013.

  1. Grenadier

    Grenadier Administrator Staff Member

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    I'm looking to add a cutlass to my collection, and was wondering what would be a good one at a reasonable price?

    I was thinking about this Cold Steel model (since Cold Steel does make decent functional swords, from my experience):

    http://www.amazon.com/Cold-Steel-Cu...LW/ref=sr_1_43?ie=UTF8&qid=1377393324&sr=8-43

    Is there something better to be had at the same price range?
     
  2. Dirty Dog

    Dirty Dog MT Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Cold Steel does make solid products, but the blade on that one looks awfully narrow for a cutlass. Looks more like a cavalry sabre.
     
  3. Blindside

    Blindside Senior Master

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    It is a close replica of the US Navy 1917 cutlass which was an almost identical copy of the Dutch "klewang" cutlass first issued in 1998 (I think). Both stayed in service through WWII.
     
  4. Daniel Sullivan

    Daniel Sullivan Grandmaster

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    Better for what? If it's going into a collection and it isn't an original piece, then all it need do is look pretty. If you're planning to use it for cutting, if Cold Steel's page is any indication, it appears to be more than up to the task. http://www.coldsteel.com/Product/88CS/1917_CUTLASS.aspx
     
  5. pgsmith

    pgsmith Master Black Belt

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    Cold steel makes decent knives, but the Japanese style swords that they make felt more like sharpened crow bars to me. Granted that a sharpened crow bar is well nigh indestructible, but I prefer my swords to actually balance in a somewhat sword-like manner. :) All of that being said, it looks decent and you'll not find too many choices out there for a cutlass.
     
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  6. Xue Sheng

    Xue Sheng Sr. Grandmaster

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    I prefer the Cutlass 442 myself :D

    [​IMG]

    Sorry, couldn't resist...I shall go away now
     
  7. lklawson

    lklawson Senior Master

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    Cold Steel makes decent blades. I wouldn't buy most of their swords because they're pigs but a cutlass (or tomahawk) would be OK. I like their Bowies. :)

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  8. lklawson

    lklawson Senior Master

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    Cutlasses were never known to be finely balanced fencing weapons.

    Historically, they were often very tip heavy and a little bit unwieldy (depending on the design). This one is fine.

    To be honest, it's probably way above standard for cutlasses, historically speaking. Blades were often painted, or even tarred to protect from corrosion. They were almost always made on an assembly line for military contract. These weren't usually some sort of officers sword. More like a meat cleaver with a basket hilt.

    There have been some references to some ships carrying and issuing machete in the place of cutlasses.

    Still, if you knew what you were doing with one, a cutlass could be a rock'n weapon, particularly in the environment for which it was intended.

    I have three cutlasses that I use for live steel drills (rebated edge, blunted point). Two custom made by Popinjay (out of biz now, I think) and one a reproduction of a Revolutionary War era "Hunting Saber" (it's the right size and has a knuckle bow).

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     

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