Asking Questions

Discussion in 'Hapkido' started by Wey, Nov 7, 2009.

  1. Wey

    Wey Green Belt

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    I've heard that the Asian arts are about strictly listening, that is, not asking questions when you train.

    Can anyone explain what kind of punishment you get for asking questions, or if you have asked a question without your teacher caring. I think this will be the biggest obstacle for me when training in Korea. Any insight will be appreciated.
     
  2. Omar B

    Omar B Senior Master

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    Keep your head in the game and do what the instructor says. Ask questions after class not during. There's nothing more disruptive than a teacher explaining a concept or a move and someone interrupting. The class is not all about you, you may not get the concept or reason but others around you might and interrupting to ask a question is just slowing everyone else's growth.

    There is not a coach in the world who would not give you a few moments after class, but during is a no go.
     
  3. MBuzzy

    MBuzzy Grandmaster

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    That is a huge misconception. There are a few very old Koreans hanging around who MIGHT be like that, but it is by no means a standard. Most instructors are open to questions and want open minds in their classes. There is no ancient Asian rule against questions, except in the movies.

    Of course, this is completely based on the instructor. As to whether you can ask questions during class or not, usually no. But like Omar said, after class should be fine. Just be aware that it is about the instructor, not the culture. I would stay after class for almost an hour every day while I lived in Korea, talking, asking questions, discussing the art, etc.
     
  4. FierySquidFace

    FierySquidFace Green Belt

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    There is a guy I know who is allways questioning techniques and forms in class. I think he really wants to understand the techniques, but sometimes it just seems like he wants to be arguementative. And it does get annoying having to break momentum while Sensai goes back and forth with him, when the rest of us are ready to move on. It's a matter of being respectfull of everyone's time and training. Just something to keep in mind perhaps...
     
  5. Wey

    Wey Green Belt

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    I see. I did not really think of it in the light that you guys are putting it in. The dojo where I used to train did not have very many people, maybe 5 training at a time, so questions were encouraged - especially because we were all beginners.

    Thank you all for your input.
     
  6. NPTKD

    NPTKD Brown Belt

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    The answer!
     
  7. dancingalone

    dancingalone Grandmaster

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    I learned Goju-Ryu karate from an Okinawan. We did not ask him questions during class. He was less formal during private lessons or during informal workouts. I used to train in his backyard and this was where most of the transmission of knowledge took place.

    Now that I teach myself, I only permit questions during a specific time in class set aside for them. I have nothing against being more open and free with my students, but there must be structure or else the class time becomes less effective for everyone present.
     
  8. dortiz

    dortiz Black Belt

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    I have been in both. Now looking back I learned twice as much if not more in the workshop style class.
    I had one teacher who spoke/answered questions for 1/3 of our time but in the end I really grasped how everything worked and starting excelling in my training much faster.
    To be honest my Korean teacher tried to explain as best as possible but a lot of the time it was too hard for them in English. I noticed tons of explanation in Korean with the Korean students.

    Dave O.
     
  9. Wey

    Wey Green Belt

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    Good thing I'm learning Korean. :D

    Thanks for your input, guys!123
     

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