A small question about physique...

Discussion in 'Health Tips for the Martial Artist' started by ThomasAld, Jul 7, 2018.

  1. ThomasAld

    ThomasAld White Belt

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    I have question I am hoping you could anwer...

    For the past three months I have been doing an ancient greek martial art named Pankration. However because of the extreme heat here in Greece my Martial Arts school will be closed for the summer. Is there something I could do by myself (in home or outside) to keep my physique or even improve it during this time? I love running and that's what i've been doing for the past week. I am also doing some of the other exercises I was doing in training (sit ups, push ups, squats, punches, kicks etc.) but i do not know if that would be enough. What else could i do?
     
  2. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    Do you train partner drills in your style? You can train solo drills (partner drills without partner) to "polish" your skill. You can also add in equipment (weight) training to "enhance" your skill.
     
  3. CB Jones

    CB Jones Senior Master

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    I had a trainer once tell me if he could only do one exercise it would be Burpees.
     
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  4. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    Hit the weights on your off season if you want because then you get the opportunity to rest.

    Otherwise do something you enjoy.
     
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  5. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    The two previous posts are good.

    You haven’t shared what, specifically, you are working to maintain. Some folks have to work to maintain strength, some to keep weight down, etc. And the answer may vary a bit (though the two previous answers would fit most situations).
     
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  6. Danny T

    Danny T Senior Master

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    I agree with drop bear. Strength training along with running, stretching, footwork drills, body movement drills, head movement drills. With your running; distance and sprints should be done.
     
  7. dvcochran

    dvcochran Master Black Belt

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    Can you make a list of what you consider your weaknesses? Break it down into manageable pieces and then prioritize the list. Work from hardest to easiest but work them all.
     
  8. JR 137

    JR 137 Senior Master

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    I’ve heard that many times. I think the Turkish getup is better though. But burpees give more of a cardio aspect to it, and Turkish getups require some weight.
     
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  9. Deafdude#5

    Deafdude#5 Green Belt

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    Work on your weaknesses.
    Lack of stamina = more cardio
    Lack of strength = weightlifting & bodyweight drills
    Too slow = pylometrics & sprints
    Etc...
     
  10. dvcochran

    dvcochran Master Black Belt

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    Just watched a video of a Turkish getup. That is gymnast strong all the way through the body.
     
  11. JR 137

    JR 137 Senior Master

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    There’s a bit of a learning curve with it at first, but it’s pretty simple. Once you get the movement down, it’s not too difficult without weight. Start adding some, and it’s a different story. You feel that one EVERYWHERE. It’s quite versatile too - use it as a warmup, a cool down, or as an exercise all on its own. There’s nothing that exercise doesn’t strengthen.

    Edit: I taught that one to my wrestling team a while back. They simultaneously loved it and hated it, which is the norm :) We used it as a warmup and cool down, and sometimes we used it as a no-weight cardio exercise. It’s a perfect wrestling exercise IMO.
     
  12. dvcochran

    dvcochran Master Black Belt

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    I can believe it. In the video I watched I watched it looked like he had a 15-20lb. kettle held vertically. Sure didn't look too easy to these old knees.
     
  13. JR 137

    JR 137 Senior Master

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    Most kettlebells are in kg, not lbs. Wothout seeing the video, I’d bet it was kg.

    At my peak with them, I was using a 20kg kettlebell. It was pretty tough for me, but I don’t think it was an extraordinary feat. I also wasn’t trying to talk and explain what I was doing while using that weight like you see in some videos though :) Holding it still while not moving isn’t too difficult if you’re doing it correctly. If you’re doing it right, you should feel the load from the kettlebell in your armpit area, as stupid as it sounds.

    After initially learning to balance and carry the weight, the hardest part is the initial sitting up and going from your elbow to your hand (first and second counts). Standing up is difficult, but not overwhelmingly difficult.

    Going back down is pretty tough too because it takes coordination and resisting letting that weight crash.

    The people I know with knee problems didn’t seem unusually bothered by them. If a lunge is ok, these are fine, but are a bit more difficult because you’re starting from a dead stop on one knee. If you’ve got knee pain, try it out without any weight a few times if you’re genuinely interested in the exercise. It might surprise you.

    Everyone’s knee pain and tolerance to specific movements is different though.
     
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