Wrestling and Karate is still the best!

Last Fearner

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I think it may be a really good idea for you to arrange to have a veiwing at an MMA gym to have a look at whats going on.
I don't know if you didn't read my previous post, or if you just didn't believe me. I've been studying the Martial Art for 42 years. I make it a point to observe others, and know what is going on in their gyms. That does not mean I am going to take a class from them. I'm not challenging what is being done in MMA gyms, and I don't know why you think there is something that I need to see "going on" that I haven't already seen in my career.

It would be a lot better for you to grasp then me trying to explain it.
Give it a go!
Again, you seem to imply that I am not "grasping" something. As I stated in my last post, it is not a matter, for me personally, of not understand, grasping, or knowing what MMA is about, and what they do. All I have said thus far is a personal opinion about the term "MIXED!" I just don't like that WORD as it applies to any Martial Art training. I believe there might be a better term to describe what is taking place.

Either way, please try to understand that there is nothing about MMA that I do not grasp, thus your difficulty in "explaining it" is a moot point. I already understand it, and am fully aware of what goes on in MMA gyms. :)

If you have any specifics you would like to add or discuss, feel free. I am open to dialogue on this or any other topic.

CM D.J. Eisenhart
 

SKB

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Any thing which puts rules on what you are able to do is not self defense. If I had to put a combination together for people with limited options, I would tell them to put boxing and wrestling together. Any training is better then no training! The idea of a baseball player swinging a bat better then some guy on the street is true. If your training for sport some of it transfers over to self defense and the reverse is also true.

I'm in law enforcement and the big thing right now is for officers to learn juijitsu. Problem is they are learning how to win in a sport setting. I watch them get people into realy cool locks and such, then I walk up and ask them what they are gpoing to do when the 'bad guy' has brought buddies with him???? They are so tangled up with just one person they have no way to defend against another person.
 

bluemtn

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I think it's good to not limit yourself, no matter what art you're doing. It doesn't have to be MMA or anything else, but it's up to you as a practitioner for what you get out of your learning. Sure- it's ok (in my opinion) to get a solid foundation in an art, and expand a bit further if you want- not that it's necessary, but it does help you get a feel for what's out there... Just some thoughts.
 

Skip Cooper

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On TUF reality show, a couple of episodes ago, I witnessed what could go wrong when you mix MMA with real life fighting. One fighter attempted to pull guard at one point, his opponent simply slammed his back into a row of landscape pavers. A short time later, the fight continued to the pavement, again the submission grappler tried for either an arm bar or a triangle choke. In response, his opponent slammed him into the pavement, thus splitting the back of his head open.

Now, after saying that, let me just say that I enjoy both wrestling and MMA. I wrestled from elementary through high school and also competed in some submission grappling tournaments, but these techniques are not what I prefer for a self defense situation that does not include referees, out of bounds circles and coaches in your corner screaming commands.
 

SKB

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On TUF reality show, a couple of episodes ago, I witnessed what could go wrong when you mix MMA with real life fighting. One fighter attempted to pull guard at one point, his opponent simply slammed his back into a row of landscape pavers. A short time later, the fight continued to the pavement, again the submission grappler tried for either an arm bar or a triangle choke. In response, his opponent slammed him into the pavement, thus splitting the back of his head open.

Now, after saying that, let me just say that I enjoy both wrestling and MMA. I wrestled from elementary through high school and also competed in some submission grappling tournaments, but these techniques are not what I prefer for a self defense situation that does not include referees, out of bounds circles and coaches in your corner screaming commands.


I watched the same episode. Did you see how the guy who hit the ground suddenly thought trying something else might be a good idea? I do not want to take anything away from these guys they are really good at what they do! Self defense on the street, in the home or during combat is diffrent then fighting in the ring. People should just be aware of this when they want to dicuss martial arts and their application outside of a sporting event.
 

Hand Sword

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Yep! Everything mentioned has it's place, even in a real street fight. The techniques have to be applied smartly though. I've known a few BJJ people that have had rude awakenings in some scuffles, similar to the one posted above, from the TUF show (and worse).
 

Em MacIntosh

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My dad was a wrestler so I had instruction at a young age. I also took karate at a young age. The two didn't go together well at first, but then my uncle instructed me in JKD to break down the barriers. They're just names with techniques and philosophies associated with them. When we put up imaginary walls we limit our ability to grow and expend extra effort crossing a barrier that doesn't exist. The trick is to be you and to use what you know the way you lerned and trained it.
 
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