Which Silat Style?

Wes Tasker

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There are actually more than one expression of Bapak de Thouars' art(s). He, and several of his students, do teach it as a Kuntao Silat system, that is a blend of both arts. Some others, such as myself, have learned the arts in their entirety and separately. When I teach his arts I teach two Kuntao systems and four Pentjak Silat systems. Not to say one approach is any better or worse than the other. I just feel it's important for people to know that Bapak Willem de Thouars does teach complete systems of Pentjak Silat and Kuntao.

-wes tasker
 

Wes Tasker

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One of the main differences between regular Silat so far is the way we practice forms. Tradionally Djurus are very short hand sets in Silat, and initially they are stationary. (footwork is added later)

If I may, this is not entirely true. Some styles of Pentjak Silat have regular forms with footwork etc. called djurus. Your explanation is more in line with thinking that all Silat systems are like Serak and Tjimande. The words Djuru and Langkah can have many varied meanings depending on which of the hundreds of Silat systems one is refering to.

-wes tasker
 

jeff5

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Wes, thanks for the correction! Admittedly I haven't been exposed to that many systems of Silat.

I think that the goal of the AKTS curriculum and progression is to give you a basic knowledge in both arts. A good foundation that you can then expand on. Then your free to pursue either on its own, or continue to study them together. (to varying degrees)
 

Trent

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Wes, thanks for the correction! Admittedly I haven't been exposed to that many systems of Silat.

I think that the goal of the AKTS curriculum and progression is to give you a basic knowledge in both arts. A good foundation that you can then expand on. Then your free to pursue either on its own, or continue to study them together. (to varying degrees)

Yes, exactly, the fundamentals are taught from each then the entire respective art(s) are taught. Sigung Gartin studied with Uncle/Grampa Bill for over 30 years. I still study with both of them.
 

tellner

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Trent, are you currently in touch with Steve Gartin? I'd heard he was a little hard to find lately.
 

doc D

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Was curious if anyone knew the names of the Silat Maphilindo instructors cited by mknight earlier in this thread. Might know a couple people who are looking to train with them.

Did he ever choose a system?????
 

Mider1985

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Inosanto i think said that the FMA systems were all once part of the greater Majuphat Empire and thus there wasnt much of a diffrence im sure there is a few variantions though. He made the Inosanto Blend which is a blend of many styles under diffrent masters
 

hzulkar

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The Majapahit empire based in Java does not extend to the Philipines. However, based on the interactions/trade/wars between all the empires in the region, which is known or named as the Malay archipelago by some historians, consisting of Malaysia, Indonesia, Brunei, Southern Philipines and Southern Thailand and maybe the Champa's have influenced each others fighting style. The Sumatrans, the Bugis also travelled and settled in the Philipines during the reign of the Sulu Sultanate and vice versa. Hence the similarities in the different styles.
 
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