Not too busy for the next 3 years?

This is scary. Welcome to the Karate Cult. If you are considering this, look at the the highlights-
1. $10 application fee, but the cost of reproducing the packet is so high that a $20 donation is appreciated but although this won't effect your acceptance, it will be remembered. (oh, by the way at Kinko's rate for copies $.08 that's 250 copies for $20, that's a huge application packet.)
2. No contact with anyone for a year but of course you can write letters but you must keep a journal for the program.
3. Since the Budo House is a non profit corp., you must work part-time at a job provided by the program director with all $$ going to the program to support it.
4. Body preparation to get to the level of full contact fighting. Fights go until he/she knocks out his opponent, injures him out of competition, or otherwise breaks his will to continue through physical blows.
5. About your 'free time"
He can expect to be just about as busy, just about as tired and just about as restricted from doing whatever he wants to do as he is now for at least his first six months or a year. After that, once he's proved his ability to handle the single-minded existence responsibly, and once he has juniors in the dormitory to take care of many of the tedious responsibilities he has now (cooking, washing dishes, mowing the lawn, etc.), his freedoms will increase. He'll never be allowed to leave the program without permission until the day he graduates or decides the program is not for him. He will, however, be given permission to leave the dormitory for entire days at a time once he's proved himself over time.
If you're considering applying to enter the BKH program, make sure you understand that you'll be coming here to do karate and karate only. You'll still have plenty of time in your life to party and hang out with your girlfriends, go to college, or whatever . . . but you won't find any of that kind of time here. If you want to learn karate better than all the rest, this is the place for you. But you must understand that for most of us "being better than all the rest" means a great deal of personal sacrifice and hardship.

I might send in the $10 just to see what the application looks like.

If you are really interested in total immersion, look into one of the "Teach English" programs in your country of choice. You get to keep your $$ and you can find the instructor you like. :asian:
 
I'm too old...;)

Hey, I don't mind the concept of hard training, but.....do I really need to go to Japan to do this? Can't I just train a couple of hours at my regular school?

Hm. Yeah. Free. Right. Something about that whole setup just ain't right, in my book.

Ah, well. Not for me.

Peace--
 
That sounds shockingly similar to the speech my instructor gave me when I started training for the Jr. Worlds. :rofl: No drinking, no women, no fun of any kind. Your life will suck, you will train 100% intensity everyday. Oh and did I mention your life is gonna suck? :D
 
sorry... this is not why i got into martial arts. sounds like big "beat em up" program. i hope the students have health insurance!
 
I would just join the military ( marines, seals, or army infantry, airborne, or artillery ) get the same training, get paid, keep the money, join a school on base ( depending on the duty station which could even be japan, etc,) and train in that art also, enroll in college and let the government pay for most of the costs. So, in 3 years, i would at least have an associate's degree, a martial arts backgound in at least 2 different arts, a hefty savings and college completion savings, new car and money for a house!
Sincerely, In Humility;
Chiduce!
 
Originally posted by Chiduce

I would just join the military ( marines, seals, or army infantry, airborne, or artillery ) get the same training, get paid, keep the money, join a school on base ( depending on the duty station which could even be japan, etc,) and train in that art also, enroll in college and let the government pay for most of the costs. So, in 3 years, i would at least have an associate's degree, a martial arts backgound in at least 2 different arts, a hefty savings and college completion savings, new car and money for a house!
Sincerely, In Humility;
Chiduce!

Good advice to someone of that age.
 
I attended the Budo Karate House in the beginning of 2001. I am one of the drop outs.

The Instructor and I used to joke about people calling the program a 'Karate Cult.' It is not that at all. The program is designed to teach people Kyokushin Karate as it is taught by Mas Oyama. It is a program designed to show American's the difference between a McDojo and a real Karate school. I've attended many martial art schools and I know for a fact that 90% of schools in the US are watered down and don't adequetly teach a person how to defend themselves.

The Instructor (Or Director) works as a Security Guard. He doesn't make much money. There is no way that he could afford to pay rent on his apartment and on the apartment the BKH students live in. So helps the students get jobs as Security Guards or elsewhere to help pay for rent, food and everything else. It is not as if he is using the money for his own personal gain. He wore shoes with holes in the toes and drove a clunker and didn't have much furniture in his house. It takes money to live and if he was a millionaire I'm sure he'd provide the program for free.

I'm an Air Force Vet and I can attest that the life-style is much easier than the military. Yes, you live according to Japanese custom and the food is absolutely terrible and I hated speaking Japanese because I'm a non-traditional martial artist. Nothing about the program is hard, except staying for three years. You train at an intense level, you are expected to do your best. That is all. You are expected to realize your potential. Many people fail and leave because they realize they just aren't willing to make the sacrifice that it takes to become one of the best at something.

The military and the martial art schools on the base will provide you with a comfortable life. They'll let you live comfortable with who you are. Who wants comfort? I am not happy to settle. I'm not satisfied with being who I am. I want to be faster, stronger and more technically adept today than I was yesterday. Can you get this at the average Dojo? I say no. I say that it takes extreme effort to become one of the best. If you want to be one of the best than the BKH program is perfect for you.

It is not a cult because you are not forced to believe anything. All you are expected to do is learn and contribute. At first you'll work, then as you've been there a while you will contribute by teaching the new students instead of working the job.
 

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